Why no safety on the Sig 226?


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bushmaster1313
December 9, 2012, 10:42 PM
As the 226 can be carried with one in the chamber and fired with a strong double action pull, why is there no safety?

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Bovice
December 9, 2012, 10:45 PM
You just explained why it doesn't need one. You don't accidentally pull a 10 pound double action trigger.

mgmorden
December 9, 2012, 10:45 PM
Because the strong double action pull negates a need for one. Its got a decocker, which is all that is needed.

HDCamel
December 9, 2012, 10:47 PM
The same reason there's no safety on almost all double-action revolvers.

bushmaster1313
December 9, 2012, 10:49 PM
Funny, I never would have thought to ask about a safety on a full size revolver, but somehow a safety on a semi-auto pistol seems to make more sense.

Kymasabe
December 9, 2012, 10:50 PM
Well, it seems everyone has already answered this question. I never needed a safety on my 226. Just decock it and your safety is that first long hard trigger pull.

56hawk
December 9, 2012, 11:00 PM
It's an interesting question to consider since I think the SIG 220 might have been the first DA/SA pistol to not have a safety. Walther, Beretta, HK, S&W and quite a few others have and still do make DA/SA guns with safeties.

bushmaster1313
December 9, 2012, 11:04 PM
Just went and tried to operate the decocker with my left index finger because I shoot left hand.
No problem, at least with an empty chamber and magazine and no distractions.

In fact as I had to take my finger away from the trigger area to operate the decocker, it might even be safer for a lefty than a righty.

The Lone Haranguer
December 9, 2012, 11:08 PM
Once the first shot has been fired, the hammer and trigger go to the single-action (cocked) position. After each string of fire, remember to decock using the decocking lever, then it goes back to double action. Repeat as necessary. :)

Bovice
December 10, 2012, 12:19 AM
+1 on that. DON'T EVER REHOLSTER UNLESS YOU DECOCK FIRST! But if you have range time with your SIG prior to using it from a holster, you should already have that concept down.

1KPerDay
December 10, 2012, 03:14 PM
Here you go...

http://www.sigsauer.com/upFiles/catalog/product/P226-X-Five_Tactical-detail-L.jpg

otasan56
December 10, 2012, 03:33 PM
Perhaps to compete functionally with the Glock pistol, which also have no safeties (other than the trigger safety).

rcmodel
December 10, 2012, 03:42 PM
Or maybe the other way around.

The first Sauer with a decocker was the Model 38H introduced in 1938.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauer_38H

I beleive the Glock came along a little later.

rc

2wheels
December 10, 2012, 03:44 PM
Perhaps to compete functionally with the Glock pistol, which also have no safeties (other than the trigger safety).
?

Glock wasn't even making handguns when Sig was making guns like this.

2wheels
December 10, 2012, 03:51 PM
The fact that the P226 has no safety is actually why I consider it superior to most other DA/SA service 9mms, good classic examples including the Beretta 92/M9 and the HK USP.

Because as far as I'm concerned on any DA/SA handgun the "safety" is the long+heavy trigger pull, a manual safety simply isn't needed and may potentially be in my way *cough* Beretta *cough*... The Sig is a simpler, cleaner design that keeps the decocker out of the way unless you need it.

But to be fair, my father started me out with his Sigs before I fell in love with 1911s. So I've always considered them to be among the best DA/SA autos out there.

Skribs
December 10, 2012, 03:52 PM
That's one thing about DA/SA pistols. SAO pistols pretty much universally have safeties. DAO largely do not. SFA pistols...well most don't have safeties, some have it (some M&P models, all Shield Models, all Taurus, Ruger, and FN models available for civilian purchase). DA/SA have either a decocker, a safety, a decocker/safety lever, and a few have a lever that does decock and safe at the same time. I think there's more variability in MOA for DA/SA pistols than there is in all the others combined, personally.

Joe_556
December 10, 2012, 04:14 PM
4 years and 3k posts and ask a silly question like that?

Joe_556
December 10, 2012, 04:19 PM
Any slide mounted safety has the potential to become engaged during a FTF, clearing or magazine change.

But, some people need them.

mgmorden
December 10, 2012, 04:27 PM
Any slide mounted safety has the potential to become engaged during a FTF, clearing or magazine change.

But, some people need them.

While I'll agree, I've also seen people bump on a frame mounted safety while firing a 1911. Its a result of a poor grip, but I've still seen it happen.

I'm personally a fan of leaving the safety off entirely, but when I do have one I do kinda like the slide-mounted safeties. My first gun was a Ruger P95 though, which had the slide-mounted safety, so I'm sure to a large degree its what you are used to. People who started on the 1911 seem to think that if the safety should have been on the slide then God would have told JMB to put it there :D.

BigJimP
December 10, 2012, 07:52 PM
If you want a safety on the 226 -- check out the 226 X-Five series.

http://sigsauer.com/CatalogProductList/pistols-p226-x-five.aspx

There are 4 models in the 226 X Five line / the top end one with the wood grips (L-1 model ) has an adjustable trigger in it - where you can set it from 2.0 - 4.0 lbs...and its a nice feature. Two of the other three are also SAO ....but no adjustable trigger ....and one is DA/SA..../ they range in price from about $ 1,350 - $2,500.

I have an L-1 model in .40S&W ....its a heavy gun / not meant for carry ...its more of a "race gun" or nice range gun ...mine is 55 oz with a full mag ( 14 + 1 rounds of .40S&W in it )...all stainless, nice wood grips, ambi safety, SAO.../ the 9mm version of the same gun is 19 + 1 rds...( same gun / just available in either caliber ).

Its a good gun ...and if you like something a little different ...it'll suit your needs.

EBK
December 11, 2012, 06:17 PM
You just explained why it doesn't need one. You don't accidentally pull a 10 pound double action trigger.
I dissagree. While that works for someone with healthy hands. Some people have injured their hands and can not pull a 10# trigger or a host of other double action triggers (my self included, its not due to streangth its due to loss of motion. It would be nice if some of the modern pistol offered with a decocker only were offered with a thumbsaftey so it could be carried cocked witht eh safety on.

This fact is why I do not and will not ever own a sig. I know one lost firearm sale will not hurt the company however there are many pistols such as a Beretta 92, ruger p345 and other P series pistols ETC. I have pased on due to double action triggers.

Which leaves me with a very limited selection of firearms to choose from in the single action manual safety category.

1KPerDay
December 11, 2012, 07:28 PM
EBK... see above posts in this thread. SIG makes several variants of the 226 in Single action. But whatever.

SwampWolf
December 11, 2012, 07:41 PM
4 years and 3k posts and ask a silly question like that?

That sounds kind of harsh but, to be honest, I was wondering much the same thing. I don't necessarily think the op's question was "silly", per se, but certainly not well thought out, at least in my mind.

Hit_Factor
December 11, 2012, 07:51 PM
Perhaps to compete functionally with the Glock pistol, which also have no safeties (other than the trigger safety).

Glocks have 3 safeties including the drop safety on the Trigger.

EBK
December 11, 2012, 07:55 PM
EBK... see above posts in this thread. SIG makes several variants of the 226 in Single action. But whatever.
I am sorry my injury and need for a lighter than 10# DA trigger/ single action trigger offends you in some way. I was just making a comment on what is currently available on the market.

I did not know that sigs were available with a thumb safety in single action. I have never seen such a beast when shopping for a handgun.

bushmaster1313
December 11, 2012, 07:55 PM
Quote:
4 years and 3k posts and ask a silly question like that?
That sounds kind of harsh but, to be honest, I was wondering much the same thing. I don't necessarily think the op's question was "silly", per se, but certainly not well thought out, at least in my mind.

I can take it

GreyCoupe
December 11, 2012, 08:52 PM
With a ten pound first pull and a decocker, who needs a safety?

EBK
December 11, 2012, 08:56 PM
With a ten pound first pull and a decocker, who needs a safety?
People with unique situations, or who just would perfer every trigger pull be consistant or any other reasons someone may come up with.

1858
December 11, 2012, 10:17 PM
People with unique situations, or who just would perfer every trigger pull be consistant or any other reasons someone may come up with.

Well, those individuals are free to buy something else but it'll be a cold day in hell before I ever buy a P series SIG with a safety. I prefer the DA/SA modes of the P series SIGs for self defense/CC since the chance of an ND in a high stress situation is virtually non-existent.

It would be nice if some of the modern pistol offered with a decocker only were offered with a thumbsaftey so it could be carried cocked witht eh safety on.

This fact is why I do not and will not ever own a sig. .

What would be the point of a decocker on such a pistol? If you want to carry a pistol cocked with the safety on then buy a 1911. SIG makes those too you know.

mgmorden
December 11, 2012, 11:22 PM
People with unique situations, or who just would perfer every trigger pull be consistant or any other reasons someone may come up with.

While not ALL DA/SA guns are like this, most that do implement a manual safety also have the safety decock the gun. As such the most commonly accepted form of "DA/SA w/ Safety" isn't going to help your situation. It sounds like given your situation a DA/SA gun just isn't for you. I'd either opt for a single action or striker fired.

TestPilot
December 12, 2012, 07:06 AM
It's for a pretty simple reason: There is a demand for such a pistol without manual firing inhibiting devices.

otasan56
December 12, 2012, 08:38 AM
?

Glock wasn't even making handguns when Sig was making guns like this.
Thanx - I didn't know this.

ku4hx
December 12, 2012, 08:43 AM
The way I see it, all guns have the ultimate safety; it's generally found between the shooter's ears.

mavracer
December 12, 2012, 09:36 AM
People with unique situations, or who just would perfer every trigger pull be consistant or any other reasons someone may come up with.
You do understand the difference between want and need. Having a preference is a want.

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 11:45 AM
The Sig 226 X-Five versions ...with the exception of the one with wood grips ...won't really stand out ....unless you look at the models in the gun sales cases carefully.

I'm not saying the 226 X-Five models are commonly found ...but some of the gun stores in my area...try to keep the X-Five Tactical in stock ...and while it lists for $ 1,696 it sells new in my area for under $ 1,400.

Personally, I favor a single action trigger as well...so I understand the OP's objections to a long DA trigger pull ...but then, that's why there are so many guns out there...and so many models...

SwampWolf
December 12, 2012, 12:32 PM
so I understand the OP's objections to a long DA trigger pull

I don't think he was "objecting" to a DA pull so much as wondering why there is no safety on some pistols that have long DA trigger pulls.

Cosmoline
December 12, 2012, 12:38 PM
There are no stupid questions, only snarky answers ;-)

But in this case there may be more to the issue than some think. Outside the US, with our 1911 heritage, it has not always been standard practice to carry one in the pipe. Even for law enforcement. And when the decocker/ DA/SA system was created in the 30's (IIRC) and popularized afterwards, the lack of a round in the chamber may in fact have been an additional safety feature.

It would be interesting to look at the original military and police manuals on these early da/sa pistols and see whether what we call Israeli presentation was the expected norm, with the long initial pull and the decocker as mere backups.

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 12:55 PM
You're right swampwolf.../ I did mistate his issue probably ....

and not to muddy the waters here....but there are techniques...where you can cock the hammer with your off hand as the gun comes up and out of the holster as well.....

I cocked all of my S&W revolvers - especially the N frames, when I was a kid, shooting my grandpa or my dads guns...

I'm in my early 60's today, but I'll still do it today once in a while:
a. on some of my S&W revolvers - especially in .44 mag...
b. on some of my Sig 226's ( where I have the standard DA/SA triggers - /or any Sig model with the DA/SA or DAK triggers if they have a hammer )
c. and of course I do it as well on my Freedom Arms - single action revolvers ( because its the only way you can shoot them ).

9mmepiphany
December 12, 2012, 02:54 PM
Thanx - I didn't know this.
Sig Sauer produced the SIG 220 in 1975, Glock produced the G17 in 1985

bushmaster1313
December 12, 2012, 08:46 PM
I don't think he was "objecting" to a DA pull so much as wondering why there is no safety on some pistols that have long DA trigger pulls.

Correct

IIRC, my HK USP had a decocker/safety lever.

My Sig 226 does not, and I was wondering what motivated Sig to not have a mechanical safety.

EBK
December 12, 2012, 09:00 PM
Well, those individuals are free to buy something else but it'll be a cold day in hell before I ever buy a P series SIG with a safety. I prefer the DA/SA modes of the P series SIGs for self defense/CC since the chance of an ND in a high stress situation is virtually non-existent.



What would be the point of a decocker on such a pistol? If you want to carry a pistol cocked with the safety on then buy a 1911. SIG makes those too you know.
Because options are good and I already own a 1911.

EBK
December 12, 2012, 09:22 PM
You do understand the difference between want and need. Having a preference is a want.
Yes I do. For me it is a need due to loss of motion, for other it may be preference.

Everyone asked why one would be asked for I gave expamples and my personal reasons why I would want one.

Nothing more nothing less.

EBK
December 12, 2012, 09:25 PM
While not ALL DA/SA guns are like this, most that do implement a manual safety also have the safety decock the gun. As such the most commonly accepted form of "DA/SA w/ Safety" isn't going to help your situation. It sounds like given your situation a DA/SA gun just isn't for you. I'd either opt for a single action or striker fired.
I also understand this and my point was more firearms need the option of either cocked and locked or decock and double action.

I would currently own a P345 and a Beretta 92 if it wasnt for the fact the thumb safety also decocks the gun.

FIVETWOSEVEN
December 12, 2012, 09:40 PM
I would currently own a P345 and a Beretta 92 if it wasnt for the fact the thumb safety also decocks the gun.

You can modify the Beretta to be able to be C/L.

EBK
December 12, 2012, 10:07 PM
You can modify the Beretta to be able to be C/L.
I did not know that. Off to google to see how!

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