What movies/tv shows portray civilian gun ownership as totally normal?


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jlbraun
December 10, 2012, 09:34 PM
What I'm talking about is a movie/tv show where having and using firearms is just a normal part of life, not related to the main story at all.

That is, the characters are shown as owning firearms for recreation and defense, but the guns are never used for a story-related purpose (shooting the badguy, shooting a stalker, etc.)

Let's exclude hunting as well, as that is the only "legitimate" reason for owning guns in a lot of minds.

Just like in real life, 99.9% of firearms are never fired or displayed in anger, but they're an integral part of a lot of peoples' lives - what media shows this?

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Yoda
December 10, 2012, 09:44 PM
Check Robert Heinlien's "Red Planet" and "Tunnel in the Sky." Both have teenagers using guns as absolutely normal.

- - - Yoda

Sam1911
December 10, 2012, 09:54 PM
So specifically shows or movies which show firearms and characters owning and using them, but not as central to the plot or being used in a dramatic function? So the guns are just background or wall-hangers or whatever?

That's pretty difficult to come up with. So not used defensively, not used offensively, not used for hunting, and I'd have to assume not for competition either? I mean...if someone made a movie of my day-to-day life (or even some extraordinary part of it) and the things I do with guns weren't depicted in that film, then there really wouldn't be any guns in the film, would there? I mean, I don't leave them lying around the house or hanging on the wall ... so the "camera" isn't likely to "see" them unless I'm doing something "gunny" with them.

I mean, the audience probably wouldn't see my lawn mower either, unless I was mowing my lawn with it.

Unistat
December 10, 2012, 10:10 PM
I'd say that Last Man Standing with Tim Allen might count for a TV show. If you're not familiar, Tim Allen's character is an executive at a big Bass Pro/Cabela's type sporting goods store. He's a manly-man but has three girls and a wife at home, no boys except his oldest girl's son.

Naturally there is lots of talk about hunting and fishing and what not. Guns are talked about in a hunting (and boyfriend intimidating) sense.

Unistat
December 10, 2012, 10:11 PM
Oh, Duck Dynasty! How could I forget about that!

Come to think about it, a lot of the "reality" shows generally show guns being used primarily as tools. Especially the ones set in Alaska.

TennJed
December 10, 2012, 10:14 PM
Andy Griffith or does the one bullet disqualify it ;)

I guess cop comedy sitcoms where the job is just a backdrop. Like the current Mike and Molly

edit***** I missed the cillivan part, sorry

It seems like a difficult question. A gun is a tool. Why put a tool into an entertainment storyline but not use it?

Teachu2
December 10, 2012, 10:15 PM
Many, many shows have backgrounds with characters carrying concealed - properly. So it never shows....

Midwest
December 10, 2012, 10:20 PM
Beverly Hillbillies , Jed Clampett always seemed to have his rifle with him.

fireman 9731
December 10, 2012, 10:33 PM
I saw an episode of Deadliest Catch where the crew of the boat was firing their AR's out in the ocean in memory of their dad. I have seen them carrying them on to the boat before they leave port. Then that's about it. Same for Gold Rush, they show a few shots of revolvers, ARs, and shotguns around camp in Alaska.

HDCamel
December 10, 2012, 11:48 PM
Let's see...


There's a brief moment in the film Three Kings where Spike Jonze's character, Conrad, is shooting stuff in his back yard (though that arguably reinforces a negative stereotype). True, he's in the Army, but that scene takes place in his off-duty time.

For most of the film, Burt's wall of guns in Tremors was pretty innocuous, but they were used to shoot one of the Graboids later. So maybe more a case of Chekov's Gunrack.

One episode of the series 30 Days had an anti-gunner live with a gun-toting father and son for a month.

The episode of Penn & Teller: Bull****! about gun control made arguments for self-defense as a valid and normal reason for wanting a firearm, but focused more on debunking anti-gun arguments.

Perhaps relating in a more tangential, abstract way... there is something recent that is very probably outside the realm of interest of the vast, VAST majority of this forum, but there is an ongoing comic from Japan (ironic, no?) that also got a TV adaptation called "Upotte!!" which depicts the normal daily lives of anthropomorphized assault rifles.

pikid89
December 11, 2012, 12:56 AM
Id have to say Duck Dynasty comes to mind...I seem to recall a few scenes where while standing around Miss Kay's kitchen there was a shotgun or two on the table or something, not part of the discussion at hand

twofifty
December 11, 2012, 01:05 AM
The Waltons?

Lucky Derby
December 11, 2012, 04:31 AM
Northern Exposure

Reloadron
December 11, 2012, 05:26 AM
Bonanza.

Ron

Sav .250
December 11, 2012, 08:12 AM
Any Western ever produced..................

mljdeckard
December 11, 2012, 08:20 AM
I sent ABC an email in support of Last Man Standing. Not only do they indulge in conservatism, they actually show handguns and evil rifles as part of the background scenery.

Pilot
December 11, 2012, 08:21 AM
Anything mainstream in recent years? No.

JustinJ
December 11, 2012, 09:50 AM
If guns are not an instrumental part of the story why would they be portrayed? Movies have limited time to tell a story, while trying to keep the audiences attention, so they tend to not just shove regular day to day activities in their just for kicks.

Atbat82
December 11, 2012, 09:56 AM
I think Checkov would object. Especially in non-reality TV or a Movie, there is no reason to write in a gun unless it furthers the plot in some way.




Sent from my iPhone

psyfly
December 11, 2012, 10:13 AM
In "Texasville", 1990 movie, a main character (Duane, played by Jeff Bridges, I think) in the opening scene is sitting in his hot tub taking target practice at his two-story dog house. I don't remember what he's using...

Of course, the book it's based on was written by a Texan...

Iron Sight
December 11, 2012, 10:21 AM
"Gunsmoke" all 635 TV episodes!

There were 432 radio episodes also. (great to listen to on a long road trip)


"Mr Dillon, Mr Dillon?"

brboyer
December 11, 2012, 10:47 AM
Boston Legal - Denny Crane :D

But I hardly think we could classify that character as 'Normal'. ;)

Dain Bramage
December 11, 2012, 10:54 AM
While not entirely in tune with the premise of this post, since guns are used in the main plot, I thought "The Adventures of Tintin" had a wholly grounded viewpoint. The title character is essentially a European teenager, yet he is comfortable around firearms and versed in their use. He even has what appears to be a Walther PP when answering his apartment door late at night. Later, he shoots down an airplane with a Browning Hi-Power.

Corpral_Agarn
December 11, 2012, 11:08 AM
While not entirely in tune with the premise of this post, since guns are used in the main plot, I thought "The Adventures of Tintin" had a wholly grounded viewpoint. The title character is essentially a European teenager, yet he is comfortable around firearms and versed in their use. He even has what appears to be a Walther PP when answering his apartment door late at night. Later, he shoots down an airplane with a Browning Hi-Power.

I Loved that movie and all of the guns in it it! there is a scene on the ship where he is running and shooting at badguys. I thoroughly enjoyed that film. One of my top 5, really.

Skribs
December 11, 2012, 11:42 AM
If it's not central to the plot, chances are they won't be there. While some movies are overtly anti-civilian-gun-use (listen to the commentaries for some action movies where a civilian and a secret agent team up, and there will be some mention of how they had to portray the agent as knowledgeable but the civilian as a dunderhead, because "there's no reason he should know how to use an assault rifle if he's not a spy").

Some TV shows involve a trip to the gun range at some point. In one episode of The Mentalist, he visits a potential suspect while the suspect is at the shooting range. At the end of that episode he is given a pistol as a gift from that person.

In the Big Bang Theory, Penny and Leonard go on a date to a gun range in one episode. Due to unsafe handling by Leonard he shoots himself in the foot.

In the show Suits, the annoying lawyer Louis goes to the gun range to calm himself down.

I guess it's part of the plot, but Harry on Harry's Law carries a .44 magnum.

There should be a TV show coming out in the near future where the main character is a gun nut. It's about a guy who hunts monsters for a living. Somehow it's connected to this forum ;)

One thing I guess would say is to change the question a bit to get more answers: what TV shows or movies show civilians with no military or police training as being responsible and competent with guns when needed? As I mentioned before, when I was watching the commentary for triple X, the director explained why Xander Cage needs to pull the trigger on an assault rifle only to hear "click" because the safety is on...because it is "realistic" that a civilian has no idea how to use an assault rifle. (Quick rant: it's been in enough movies, just turn the safety off).

None really come to mind. Most of the movies with civilians doing this kind of thing, they either learn as they go or they are former military.

youngda9
December 11, 2012, 11:44 AM
Tremors...Reba !!

itchy1
December 11, 2012, 12:04 PM
The character Robin from "How I Met Your Mother" comes to mind. There's one scene where she's at a shooting range with what appeared to be a DE in .50.

Tommygunn
December 11, 2012, 12:04 PM
Ooooooooops.

Sam1911
December 11, 2012, 12:05 PM
While not entirely in tune with the premise of this post, since guns are used in the main plot, I thought "The Adventures of Tintin" had a wholly grounded viewpoint. The title character is essentially a European teenager, yet he is comfortable around firearms and versed in their use. He even has what appears to be a Walther PP when answering his apartment door late at night. Later, he shoots down an airplane with a Browning Hi-Power.

Indeed, I felt that the portrayal of firearms used frequently and proficiently -- by a young person no less -- in righteous defense was extremely unexpected and refreshing.

However, this and many other examples given seem to violate the constraints of the OP's question as the use of those arms was pertinent to the plot.

In other words, we know young Mr. Tintin carries a pocket pistol and is well-trained in using various firearms -- but we only know that because he's required to use them in the story. If not for that, if he simply went about his business as most of us do every day, firearms would not be a visible presence in the story, except as placed in a scene specifically for some reason.

Skribs
December 11, 2012, 12:12 PM
In other words, we know young Mr. Tintin carries a pocket pistol and is well-trained in using various firearms -- but we only know that because he's required to use them in the story. If not for that, if he simply went about his business as most of us do every day, firearms would not be a visible presence in the story, except as placed in a scene specifically for some reason.

I guess you were right in your earlier post then. Movies won't show the guns being used unless it's pertanent to the plot, because there's just not enough time. Unless you count scenes where the gun is used just as sort of a background for the scene (like when the Senator and the Colonel are talking in Shooter while the Senator is shooting clays) or as just a gag.

Scenes from Second-Hand Lions come to mind all of a sudden, when they're fishing with shotguns (that scene was downright hillarious) and when they use corn for sporting clays.

Kleanbore
December 11, 2012, 12:13 PM
To Kill a Mockingbird

Cosmoline
December 11, 2012, 12:59 PM
there is no reason to write in a gun unless it furthers the plot in some way.

That absolutely is the standard practice for screenwriters and has been for a long time. The firearms are used to further the plot and drive the action. So if a character has a firearm, it WILL be used. To a ridiculous extent in many cases. It's gotten to be just lazy writing. If you're stuck in a script, you throw in a firearm for the characters to wrestle over. I've seen that exact scene at least one thousand times in movies and TV. Brandishing, wrestling, reverse brandishing, some pithy words from the hero and then on to the commercial.

It's hard to think of any film or TV show that really normalizes firearms without using them as a plot device. One film that springs to mind is "The Ranger, The Cook and the Hole in the Sky" which is a very nice Sam Elliot TV movie about forest service workers around 1919. The young ranger carries a heavy framed .38 for snakes. Though even then I think it was drawn and ineffectually fired at a snake. Can't remember for sure.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0114235/

Skribs
December 11, 2012, 01:19 PM
Take firearms out of the question, and when is ANYTHING in a movie that isn't important to the plot? Even if the movie has no plot.

Cosmoline
December 11, 2012, 01:30 PM
There are many things that help flesh out a character but don't play a role in the plot. From clothing to cars. They're just part of the scenery. They help to tell you a little about a person and also give you a sense of the time and place. But firearms are really just plot devices. They get things moving forward from one scene to the other. In many respects they stopped being firearms a very long time ago. The screenwriters use them as a sort of totem/symbol for action and movement.

Ever notice the absurd number of firearms stuck or cut-n-pasted onto DVD covers and movie posters? Often in films that feature few shootouts. They're a symbol of action.

I just thought of a film that uses at least one firearm for building character without a shootout: David Fincher's Zodiac. Dave Toschi's famous upside-down rig is featured, but he never draws his firearm. The weapon is featured solely to establish Toschi's off-beat personality. Like the animal crackers he eats. I don't think that's a conscious choice by the director. It's simply the result of his obsessive fixation on PRECISE details, right down to the typewriters used by the Chronicle or the type of sandwiches people ate in the early 70's. Toschi never draws iron because he never did in real life. He never caught the guy.

psyfly
December 11, 2012, 01:43 PM
Just thought of another one, Chicago-set lawyer show, "The Good Wife" had a fairly well-balanced episode where a gun-savvy employee gets her anti-gun employer a (quite illegal, BTW, per Chicago law) handgun and the only "shoot-out" in the episode is the employee with another (not her boss) lawyer at an indoor range.

Interesting quirk about the range scene is that each of them holds his/her handgun in the right hand and leans over to close the right eye and aim with the left. Kinda bizarre (although I tried it just for grins and it works okay).

W

Sam1911
December 11, 2012, 02:13 PM
Interesting quirk about the range scene is that each of them holds his/her handgun in the right hand and leans over to close the right eye and aim with the left. Kinda bizarre (although I tried it just for grins and it works okay).
That's actually the standard way for folks who are cross-dominant to shoot handguns. Usually it's just a slight turn of the head, not "leaning over," but that's the general idea -- right hand operation, left eye aiming.

With rifles or shotguns a "weak-side" dominant-eyed person is usually best-served to shoot from the "weak" shoulder so their dominant eye can give them a better sight picture and they don't have to close or squint one eye to shoot.

vito
December 11, 2012, 02:37 PM
To Kleanbore: The gun used in "To Kill a Mockingbird" is central to the plot. When used by the main character, to shoot a rabid dog, it is showing that he is not just some cerebral, high minded attorney but a practical man who is a crack shot as well. Especially in the setting of the movie, the deep south, proficiency with a rifle would be seen as a sign of manhood.

As others have stated, the sight of a gun without relevance to the plot would be a distraction and possibly cause confusion since viewers would keep waiting to see when the gun will come into play. Even a detail about a gun is only shown when it is needed to advance the plot. If you have ever seen the Coen brothers film "Blood Simple", at one point a character takes her husband's revolver, opens the cylinder, and you see several rounds (but not all chambers with a round). Late in the film the gun comes into play, and the specific number and placement of the rounds becomes key to the outcome of the action.

What might be most interesting would be a film or TV show where a key character, in the course of, lets say, taking off his coat after being at work all day, also removes a concealed handgun, placing it on a counter, or in a drawer, etc. without any further reference to it. This would show an ordinary citizen who just happens to carry a gun. If the individual were a character who is seen in a generally positive perspective, all the better.

cyclopsshooter
December 11, 2012, 02:58 PM
Adam 12- citizens right to own.. even hand them back without running numbers

Keith_Alva
December 11, 2012, 04:01 PM
The TV series "Smallville". Although the guns were very often a part of the plots or subplots, concealed or open carry of firearms never appeared to be a big deal to any of the other characters.

The TV series "Justified". Although, once again, often part of the plot, it is built in to the series that every one in those hollers has a gun.

Devonai
December 11, 2012, 04:08 PM
Despite being an archetypical hero, Indiana Jones is, at his base, a private citizen. I don't think he'd be so well protected on his expeditions today, though.

I think Chekhov would object.

"If you say in the first chapter that there is a rifle hanging on the wall, in the second or third chapter it absolutely must go off. If it's not going to be fired, it shouldn't be hanging there." Anton Chekhov, 1860-1904

Dain Bramage
December 11, 2012, 05:21 PM
Indeed, I felt that the portrayal of firearms used frequently and proficiently -- by a young person no less -- in righteous defense was extremely unexpected and refreshing.

Even more surprising; it's from Steven "Beat Your Guns into Walkie-Talkies" Spielberg. I suppose he could say he was being true to the source material, or "it portrays a different time".

Supposedly, they're working on a sequel. It will be interesting to see if it keeps the same vibe. Might be a while, though. Motion capture can take a long time, and the first one was in production for over three years.

Skribs
December 11, 2012, 05:26 PM
Dain, what does that phrase even mean? "Beat your guns into walkie talkies"?

JellyJar
December 11, 2012, 05:46 PM
I have mentioned this before in an old post but in the 1930s

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Only_Angels_Have_Wings

in the movie "Only Angles have Wings" IIRC every male character is shown carrying a revolver in an open holster in every scene and yet there is never any mention made of the guns "at all" and the guns fired for any reason.

I can't remember about the chief female character, she may have been carrying as well.

In that movie carrying a revolver was just as normal as wearing pants!

Edit: I just found some clips from the movie on youtube:

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=only+angles+have+wings&mid=86A1A3F7FCE7B34BF01586A1A3F7FCE7B34BF015&view=detail&FORM=VIRE5

Yoda
December 11, 2012, 06:00 PM
Does Charles Bronson's revolver in "Death Wish" count?

- - - Yoda

mljdeckard
December 11, 2012, 06:02 PM
Come to think of it, last season, "Modern Family" had an episode where a female character went to the range to relieve stress. It was followed up later with a mysterious coupon being mailed to her house, which she pretended to not understand. :)

Dain Bramage
December 11, 2012, 09:19 PM
Dain, what does that phrase even mean? "Beat your guns into walkie talkies"?


In the later releases of "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial", Spielberg wiped the guns out of the hands of the FBI men chasing the kids, and replaced them with CGI walkie-talkies. It was taken as a PC anti-gun gesture, although Spielberg has no problem arming archeology professors, Nazis, and brutal Japanese soldiers. That's why Tintin was a pleasant surprise.

SEE IT LIKE A NATIVE
December 11, 2012, 09:34 PM
In "Macon county line " one of the charactors tried to trade a 22 rifle for some car repairs !

Liberty1776
December 11, 2012, 10:06 PM
Red Dawn? - Either one. Also, The Wind and The Lion...

Jorg Nysgerrig
December 11, 2012, 10:08 PM
Somewhere on a croquet forum there is a similar thread with people lamenting the lack of croquet players in mainstream media.

Warp
December 11, 2012, 10:13 PM
Movie: Couples retreat

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1078940/

Vince Vaughn's character (main character, kinda) retrieves a handgun from his bedside safe when he thinks somebody is breaking into the house. He goes downstairs to check it out (I think he even followed rule #3) and when he realizes it's a friend trying to break into the house, they quickly talk about the issues at hand (relationship stuff) and firearms are never brought up again

gtd
December 11, 2012, 10:19 PM
The Walking Dead on AMC.

Yeah they take guns from abandoned shops and so forth, but guns are also staples in several households from before the apocalyptic event and just happen to be available.

Gillster
December 12, 2012, 02:40 PM
How about Wall Street with Michael Douoglas when he shows off his gun collection, including the .45 Luger P08 to his business rival. Huge collection mounted on the wall, he shows them off but they are not used or mentioned again.

HorseSoldier
December 12, 2012, 03:59 PM
I'd say that Last Man Standing with Tim Allen might count for a TV show. If you're not familiar, Tim Allen's character is an executive at a big Bass Pro/Cabela's type sporting goods store. He's a manly-man but has three girls and a wife at home, no boys except his oldest girl's son.

Naturally there is lots of talk about hunting and fishing and what not. Guns are talked about in a hunting (and boyfriend intimidating) sense.

+1. Allen's boss on the show (played by Hector Elizando, forget the character name) has a gun collection on the wall behind his desk which includes a very visible AK. I think, but am not sure, that the show has depicted the guns with and without trigger locks on them in different episodes.

tacxted
December 12, 2012, 04:16 PM
one scene in the new movie SAFE where character Mei saves Luke Wright(jason statham) from a fight that would have been "bad buisness" for him

this isnt a great example so nvm.

Corpral_Agarn
December 12, 2012, 04:34 PM
+1. Allen's boss on the show (played by Hector Elizando, forget the character name) has a gun collection on the wall behind his desk which includes a very visible AK. I think, but am not sure, that the show has depicted the guns with and without trigger locks on them in different episodes.
I am almost positive that at least some of those guns are real. IIRC, there was some extra hoops to jump through to get those up there.

Skribs
December 12, 2012, 04:39 PM
Yeah Tacxted, that scene cracked me up. I was disappointed though, I was looking forward to an epic fight scene.

On 24, there are examples of good guys (usually related to Jack) using guns, although they are usually getting them from the bad guys.

Skyfall has James Bond team up with an old civilian, using local weaponry. Jason Bourne used a double-barrel rifle in the first movie. While these are special agents, they are using weapons obtained from local families.

Stop or My Mom Will Shoot (terrible movie; but I love it) has the little old lady shooting a giant revolver at the bad guy.

Men In Black has the farmer and the tow truck driver both armed, although that seemed kind of futile.

In the movie Shooter, the extended scenes, they explain that they're buying rifles so that Mark Wallberg can take Michael Pena and "lern him sum huntin." So they're pretending to be normal gun owners.

In the last Rambo, the missionaries pick up guns at the end of the fight, which is very symbolic because at the beginning of the movie they were telling him "it is NEVER right to take a life."

Multiple FPS video games (such as Half Life and Prey) have you playing the part of a civilian that picks up guns as you go about fighting off aliens.

Fishbed77
December 12, 2012, 05:39 PM
Modern Family.

There is an episode in which it is revealed that Claire (without the knowledge of the rest of her family) is shown to frequent a local indoor range as an escape from her hectic family life. Her younger step-mother Gloria follows her there and proves to be a crack shot.

There is another episode in which Phil and his father-in-law Jay are shown shooting clays at a "dude ranch" type place. Phil manages to nail a few trick shots. Nothing is made of the guns other than the fact that ultra-manly Jay is a little miffed that Phil can out-shoot him.

Skribs
December 12, 2012, 06:21 PM
Oh, thought of another one from Big Bang Theory. Sheldon's Mom, a born-again Christain from Texas, was going on a cruise with her church, and one of the events was "gunning for God," where you write your sins on a clay pidgeon, launch it, and blast it away with a 12-gauge shotgun.

I've been trying to have my Mom start this program at her church for years.

DAP90
December 14, 2012, 09:56 PM
I was watching Rudolf the Red Nosed Reindeer with my son tonight and Yukon Jack has a revolver in his belt through the whole show and never uses or mentions it.

CraigC
December 14, 2012, 10:20 PM
I remember a recent movie with Vince Vaughn where he had a pistol in a quick access safe and there was nothing weird about it. If I remember right, it was a very positive impression and definitely not central to the main story.


Take firearms out of the question, and when is ANYTHING in a movie that isn't important to the plot? Even if the movie has no plot.
I have to disagree with this. There are almost ALWAYS important things going on in the background or tangent to the main plot that aren't central in telling the story. Very little happens by accident.

mljdeckard
December 14, 2012, 10:23 PM
Great episode of "Last Man standing" tonight, Elizondo tells a funny story while holding a camo turkey gun. :)

Tom Fury
December 15, 2012, 04:54 AM
Firefly; is it just me or can no one imagine a future without guns? In a lot of recent science fiction, it seems everybodys' packin'.

Burn notice: LOL at Maddie Westens' line about: "What kind of a sissy WOULDN'T sleep with a gun under his pillow?"

Sherlock: Though its' a BBC2 series, not a whimper about the facr that Holmes and Watson both keep Sigs and some of their clients have access as well. Lestrade is summoned to assist in the Hound of Baskerville ep and is strongly encouraged to: "Bring a gun..."

TrakHack
December 15, 2012, 09:39 AM
The Blind Side

Leigh Anne Touhy: You threaten my son, you threaten me. If you so much as set foot downtown, you will be sorry. I'm in a prayer group with the D.A., I'm a member of the NRA and I'm always packing.

Alton: Whatchu packin? .22? A little Saturday night special?

Leigh Anne Touhy: Yep. And it shoots just fine every other day of the week too.

mac tm
December 15, 2012, 01:31 PM
DAP90- I watched Rudolph last night with my son too and was about to post about Yukon's revolver. You beat me to it!

Unistat
December 19, 2012, 06:32 PM
Holy Crap! How could I forget Parks and Rec!

Nick Offerrman's character Ron ,deleted. Swanson is a gun owner. Heck he is shown with a (tacky) gold plated revolver in the credits! There has been numerous time when guns have been depicted in the show and I can only think of once when it was relevant to the plot.

http://s3.vidimg02.popscreen.com/original/35/Z1hOREpud3B2aWcx_o_parks-and-recreation-season-3-opening-credits.jpg

answerguy
December 19, 2012, 06:43 PM
The reality show Top Shot portrays guns being used in a normal, proper and safe manner.

jmr40
December 19, 2012, 08:43 PM
This is pretty good.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1314228/


Sam Ellliott as a rural Wyoming sheriff hiding two city slickers from NYC so the mob won't find them before they can testify. His wife, played by Mary Steenburgen is the family gun nut. Nothing over the top, but Elliott and his wife make owning a gun look as normal as owning a toaster.

Grassman
December 19, 2012, 09:31 PM
Myth Busters?

mg.mikael
December 19, 2012, 09:52 PM
+1 for the person mentioning the FX show Justified

Which reminds me, I have yet to finish watching the second season....

answerguy
December 19, 2012, 09:55 PM
The TV series Lost had lots of gun useage, I'm not sure it showed responsible gun use but it showed lot's of it.

chibajoe
December 19, 2012, 10:41 PM
I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Firefly.

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 19, 2012, 10:47 PM
Well, the OP is talking about shows where guns are present, but not used, spotlighted, talked about, etc. Just shows or movies where a gun in a safe or holster gets as much attention as a hockey stick in a garage or a tennis racket in a locker. It's there. It's visible. But that's it. Just another normal prop that normal people use.

So shows like Firefly, Top Shot, Mythbusters, etc all don't really apply as they are specifically about guns in some way or guns make up a major part of the action. Not really what the OP is looking for, if I read the post right.

Warp
December 20, 2012, 10:24 PM
Well, the OP is talking about shows where guns are present, but not used, spotlighted, talked about, etc. Just shows or movies where a gun in a safe or holster gets as much attention as a hockey stick in a garage or a tennis racket in a locker. It's there. It's visible. But that's it. Just another normal prop that normal people use.

I think that maybe 2 people who replied have actually been able to understand that.

I stand by my input of Couples Retreat. It perfectly meets the OP requirement

Warp
December 27, 2012, 08:44 PM
Movie: Couples Retreat

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jloa-JHjxgE

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 28, 2012, 05:23 AM
Other than the terrible trigger discipline, that's a great scene.

Sam1911
December 28, 2012, 07:59 AM
Holy Crap! How could I forget Parks and Rec!

Nick Offerrman's character Ron ,deleted. Swanson is a gun owner. Heck he is shown with a (tacky) gold plated revolver in the credits! There has been numerous time when guns have been depicted in the show and I can only think of once when it was relevant to the plot.
Unfortunately, Nick and his wife Meagan Mullally, Amy Pohler, Rashida Jones, Aziz Ansari, and a lot of others just did a big anti-gun TV spot, so no more Parks & Rec for me.

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