Why choose 1911 over a revolver?


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el Godfather
December 12, 2012, 12:22 AM
Dear THR:
I have been thinking about the capacity and power issues in juxtaposition to .45 1911 and a .357 Mag revolver, and I wonder whats the trade off that folks make in favor of a 1911. I like 1911 in general for its profile and design, but it is a huge compromise on capacity when comparing to modern polymer guns especially in 9mm. However, the liking to big and powerful 45 sometimes and conceal-ability when compared to double stack polymer guns is what appeals in a 1911. Nevertheless, if we do compromise on capacity in favor of more power, why not a 357 magnum revolver?

Thank you

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mgmorden
December 12, 2012, 12:27 AM
#1 reason is an infinitely better trigger. 1911's are regarded as a flat out joy to shoot. Aside from a small niche segment of the market most people don't like revolver triggers.

Besides that, reloads are faster and take up less space on the belt (a 1911 magazine is thinner than a speedloader.

ColtPythonElite
December 12, 2012, 12:29 AM
I wouldn't....

blakec3686
December 12, 2012, 12:35 AM
well i don't know about anyone else but here is my .02....first off im only 5'5 and about 150 on a good day...think hobbit and that's me lol... The 1911 with its slim profile is easier for my to ccw even full size. even a small glock is just too thick ...so any revolver (so far as i've tried) is way to thick and stick out like crazy but that"s not my biggest reason (i live in a very gun friendly shire lol) ..second and more important for me is the simple fact that the 1911 feels great in my hand, it points naturally and i love shooting it....so it gets the nod everyday for my edc.

Blake

tarosean
December 12, 2012, 01:01 AM
Aside from a small niche segment of the market most people don't like revolver triggers.

I would have to disagree.... If you want to talk about horrid triggers, every single poly gun has them. But that doesn't stop their popularity.

3twelves
December 12, 2012, 01:12 AM
Why choose a 1911 or a revolver over a poly pistol?

BYJO4
December 12, 2012, 01:14 AM
I like both 1911s and S&W revolvers. Both are fun to shoot and accurate. Everyone has their own idea about whats comfortable to carry in regards to size and weight. I do agree that a 1911 is faster to reload and a spare mag takes up little space on your belt. I just can't get into the poor triggers found in polymer guns even though they offer higher mag capacity.

HDCamel
December 12, 2012, 01:22 AM
Because my #1 concern with ANY defensive weapon is proficiency and it just so happens that I'm most proficient with 1911s.

Zekest Crowe
December 12, 2012, 01:24 AM
Why choose a 1911 or a revolver over a poly pistol?

It depends on your goal. If your goal is to shove it down your pants and lug it around all day every day, a poly pistol makes a lot of sense. If your goal is to punch holes in a sheet of paper 25 yards away, a 1911 made out of plastic or steel makes a lot of sense, as does a revolver. If you have an overwhelming fear of being caught in a firefight against a biker gang, a semi auto, poly or steel, with six mags bolted to your belt would win over a revolver with the same number of speed loaders. Maybe you just like the look and feel of a steel gun over a molded hunk of plastic. :)

JERRY
December 12, 2012, 01:28 AM
Why? Personal preference is all i can come up with.

Sergei Mosin
December 12, 2012, 01:33 AM
Assuming a full-size revolver such as the GP100, the 1911 has the advantage in concealability, capacity, and time to reload. The GP100 has the advantage in reliability - no gun is more foolproof than the DA/SA revolver. Both fire powerful cartridges that are plenty adequate for self-defense. So to me, it's 6-5 and pick 'em - they're both fine choices and I don't feel undergunned when carrying either one.

CABob
December 12, 2012, 01:43 AM
I own both, but a 1911 is easier to carry for me. More compact, if that makes sense. But I also just love my 1911 more than any of my other handguns. It's easier to shoot, feels great in my hand, and all around is a gorgeous gun. Another .02: metal over plastic all day.

TestPilot
December 12, 2012, 08:08 AM
1. Slimmer proflie makes it easier to carry.
2. It ergonomically suits better for some people, making it easire to shoot.
3. Faster reload.
4. Extra magazines are even easier to carry than speed loaders or moon clips.
5. Good SAO trigger.

ActionJax
December 12, 2012, 08:27 AM
1911 -- Light crisp Single-action trigger. Should/must be carried "cocked and locked". Is this good or bad? You be the judge.

.357 Mag -- Long revolver trigger. Should be carried hammer down even if DA/SA. Again, good/bad?...

I prefer a long, strong trigger AND and external safety, so things like a S&W Bodyguard or a Kahr PM9 - 9193 work best for me. I carry the Bodyguard and have no trouble with the safety or the long trigger -- plenty accurate enough for SD situations.

snooperman
December 12, 2012, 08:27 AM
I have both 1911 Colt 1970 series and the Colt Magnum carry revolver. I prefer the 6 shot 357 magnum weighing 21 oz any day over the heavier 1911 as a daily carry gun. The action of the Magnum carry is very smooth in DA and much faster to put into action. I also think the revolver has an edge in reliability and 6 shots is enough to get the job done.

Redlg155
December 12, 2012, 08:29 AM
It's hard to argue against a 230 grain bullet at 850-900 fps, whether FMJ or JHP.
I would not trust my life to 9mm 124gr FMJ. Unfortunately many of our soldiers are forced to do so.

LNK
December 12, 2012, 08:33 AM
I don't see the problem. Obviously they both have their good and bad points. I carry both (not at the same time). The 1911 is way more comfortable yet heavy, and reloads are more convenient to carry. Unless you carry speed strips, then that is a wash except for speed. My GP100 and 1911 have both proven reliable. Capacity is basically the same. Sometimes I like carrying one over the other. Pick whichever one you want, odds are it wont matter....

LNK

Ragnar Danneskjold
December 12, 2012, 09:00 AM
Well given that statistically speaking, you will completely miss with more than half of the rounds your fire; those additional rounds would be pretty nice to have if you ever actually had to shoot.

Cocked & Locked
December 12, 2012, 09:04 AM
http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/9381895/398719871.jpg

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6486421/398335687.jpg

LNK
December 12, 2012, 09:21 AM
Well given that statistically speaking, you will completely miss with more than half of the rounds your fire; those additional rounds would be pretty nice to have if you ever actually had to shoot.

If we extend that further, if a hoard of (pick your favorite mob) came after you, you would be hosed too. I think comfort and proficiency trumps capacity. YMMV.

LNK
..
P.S. See you back at the Gulch ;)

ku4hx
December 12, 2012, 09:36 AM
Depends on your specific wants and needs; buy both and enjoy them all.

mljdeckard
December 12, 2012, 09:42 AM
The trigger. I used to carry a Glock 22, and I don't miss the trigger nor regret the switch for one second. I no longer feel like I have to have a high-capacity lead Pez dispenser to be adequately armed.

We do not live in Melgibsonland, where you fire 16 straight shots with no chance to reload. If I am in a pickle which cannot be resolved with my 8+1, it is highly unlikely that higher capacity will solve it either.

dgroff85
December 12, 2012, 09:42 AM
I agree with ku4hx, buy both...

http://i1109.photobucket.com/albums/h427/dgroff85/Colts/437.jpg

Fishbed77
December 12, 2012, 10:14 AM
If you want to talk about horrid triggers, every single poly gun has them. But that doesn't stop their popularity.

Someone has never fired a Walther P99AS or PPQ.

PabloJ
December 12, 2012, 10:35 AM
#1 reason is an infinitely better trigger. 1911's are regarded as a flat out joy to shoot. Aside from a small niche segment of the market most people don't like revolver triggers.

Besides that, reloads are faster and take up less space on the belt (a 1911 magazine is thinner than a speedloader.
LGS had S&W 19 4". The gun had yellow front blade insert, trigger shoe polished to mirror finish and superbly adjusted DA trigger pull. This was fighting revolver as it had "hair trigger" SA pull which could not be released w/o slight pull on trigger shoe (very professional job). Very fine weapon indeed which I would have gladly brought home if I haven't own Glock pistol already.

TarDevil
December 12, 2012, 10:40 AM
Someone has never fired a Walther P99AS or PPQ.
There are plenty to add to that list. My polymer striker gun has a delicious trigger.

Cocked & Locked
December 12, 2012, 10:43 AM
LGS had S&W 19 4". The gun had yellow front blade insert, trigger shoe polished to mirror finish and superbly adjusted DA trigger pull. This was fighting revolver as it had "hair trigger" SA pull which could not be released w/o slight pull on trigger shoe (very professional job). Very fine weapon indeed which I would have gladly brought home if I haven't own Glock pistol already.

Sorry, not a valid excuse! :scrutiny:

mgmorden
December 12, 2012, 10:45 AM
LGS had S&W 19 4". The gun had yellow front blade insert, trigger shoe polished to mirror finish and superbly adjusted DA trigger pull. This was fighting revolver as it had "hair trigger" SA pull which could not be released w/o slight pull on trigger shoe (very professional job). Very fine weapon indeed which I would have gladly brought home if I haven't own Glock pistol already.

All well and good, but for defensive purposes you have to measure the DA trigger pull, which on revolvers is typically long and heavy (at least compared to a single action semi-auto).

I'm not anti-revolver. I own 4 of them including a S&W 64-3 with a very, very nice trigger for a revolver, but I'll admit that I prefer the trigger on just about any semi-auto I own (including polymer guns), with about the sole exception being my LCP. It has a trigger just as long and heavy as a revolver but it's a much thinner and concealable gun so I live with it.

snakeman
December 12, 2012, 10:47 AM
I'd just get both, if I had more money!

2wheels
December 12, 2012, 11:20 AM
Most of the important points have been covered, for CCW the 1911 is slimmer, many prefer the SAO trigger, and the slight capacity advantage+speed and ease of reloading.

Here's an interesting take on the subject from WW1, though the revolvers in question weren't .357 Mags. I think it's a fun read that somewhat relates to the discussion.

http://vuurwapenblog.com/2011/04/10/pistols-vs-revolvers-world-war-one/

One of the big advantages he mentions is the ease of reloading the automatic vs. the revolver, not sure if they had speedloaders back then though. Also, the fact that the automatic can be easily reloaded before it is empty.

As a side note, I found it amusing how he mentions that the 1911 not "pointing" correctly was a common complaint among longtime revolver users... Funny how we now regard the 1911 as having the best grip angle out there!

snooperman
December 12, 2012, 11:37 AM
Someone, I believe Masad Ayoob, did a study with police shootings to find out if the semi auto made a difference with their higher capacity and quick reloads than the old revolvers carried for decades. He found that the officers who carried the revolvers got as many shots on the bad guy, ending the fight, as the new officers with their new high capacity semi auto guns. Also, we know that soldiers today expend far more ammo in combat to take out one enemy soldier than they did with the old M1 Garand. I think there is some merit in "keeping it simple".

snooperman
December 12, 2012, 11:46 AM
That said, if I were in combat I would feel better armed with higher capacity semi autos than a revolver. But, for a CCW a revolver will do the job just fine.

Mat, not doormat
December 12, 2012, 11:55 AM
1911 has the best trigger in the business, holds two rounds more than the .357, doesn't have a giant bulbous cylinder in the middle, is easier to reload, and easier to clear malfunctions, and less noise, flash, and recoil.

What does the revolver offer in exchange? It's a little less likely to jam. That's it.

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

cuba
December 12, 2012, 01:46 PM
While most of the pros and cons have been discussed I believe that the most important one is the recovery time between the two, giving that a defensive round like the 125 gr 357 magnum is use, you will be able to get off five accurate shots of 45 acp to two of the 357 magnum (key word being accurate) beside being blinded by the magnum's flash if fired in a low light environment.

shoot safe, shoot straight, and have fun

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 02:29 PM
Combat or being a Law Enforcement officer ....(and probably needing high capacity is one thing ) ...but civilian defense is an entirely different thing...

I have a relatively large collection of S&W revolvers - especially in .357 mag...and carrying a K frame S&W ( model 19 or 66 - especially in a 4" ) with 6 shots is plenty of defensively capability....

...same thing on a 1911 ...whether its in a 9mm ( with 10 + 1 ) or .45 acp with 8+ 1 rounds...its plenty of firepower.
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I train every week with some of my handguns ( 6 - 10 boxes a week or so ) primarily as a hobby ...because I like to shoot ( draw from a holster, double tap a target, reloads, etc...) ...some weeks I'll just shoot one of my 1911's - because that is what I carry ....or some weeks "its a revolver week" ... / my training standard is to draw from holster and double tap a target in under 3 sec...and it makes no difference if its a 1911, a S&W K or N frame in .357 mag...or a double stack Sig 226 ....( now 3 sec isn't lightning quick - by competition standards...it should be closer to 1.25 sec / but its my standard - and at 62 yrs old ...its good enough / if I'm 90+% on target out to 30 Feet/ some days I'm 100% , some days, not so much....) - but in my opinion, its a competent standard.
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In general, I think everyone should carry the gun they shoot the best...and while budgets certainly enter into selecting a gun ...for those of us, older guys, that can basically afford to buy and shoot whatever we want...there are a number of us that turn to 1911's...despite their low round capacity. Its about the Fit, the excellent triggers(how they break and reset), slim profile, etc...

my primary carry gun, is and will continue to be a Wilson CQB model, 1911 obviously - 5", in .45 acp....but yesterday, out shopping... I dropped a S&W model 19 4" Nickel . 357 mag into an IWB holster.....and it was just fine as well..

There is no right or wrong answer to this ....but I'll never carry a poly frame gun of any kind...(not even a Wilson Spec ops - poly frame )...but I'm old school.../ and the thickness of a big double stack gun is not very appealing to me either...while I have big all stainless models of Sig 226's in 9mm and .40 S&W, I never carry them ..even though I have good horsehide holsters for them...I do train with them some weeks...but I just don't like to carry them....

For me, I have nothing against a 9mm....I'll carry a 1911 in 9mm once in a while....but a 1911 in .45 acp or a S&W K frame in .357 mag ...just make me feel warm and fuzzy....

Just One Shot
December 12, 2012, 02:33 PM
I own both, 1911 & revolver. If I had to choose between them my personal preference would be the 1911 due to the higher capacity of ammo, faster reloading, better sights and IMO a better and easier to manipulate trigger.

As I said, this is just my personal preference, your opinion may vary. ;)

CommanderCrusty
December 12, 2012, 02:42 PM
Why choose either when you can have BOTH?

tarosean
December 12, 2012, 03:17 PM
^^ winner...

I have both in a variety of sizes.

I feel comfortable carrying down to a Jframe, and do so quite a bit. Im not LEO or in the Military so I have a better shot at winning the lotto then being in a shootout, and I dont play the lotto.

Bikewer
December 12, 2012, 03:47 PM
I carried a S&W M19 for the first 15 years or so of my police career... Nice weapon on the duty belt.... Wouldn't have wanted to stick it under a shirt.

Likewise the M1911.. Had one, carried it briefly off-duty... Too much to lug around IMO.

We transitioned to the Glock M23 and that's been my duty gun ever since... A superb combat weapon. I wouldn't pick it for a general-purpose weapon or a target gun... but for it's purpose unsurpassed.

My off-duty gun for years is a little J-frame .38. I'm not overly happy with it, but I seldom carry it. (I'm not exactly on the "mean streets" anymore)
I am considering a small autopistol. The current small-frame 9mms look pretty good... A few more rounds and quicker reloads than the J-frame... And likely superior performance.
Still, I do like the .40 and something like the baby Glock or the S&W Shield are appealing.

Skribs
December 12, 2012, 04:46 PM
I honestly lean VERY strongly towards double-stack pistols. Given the choice between a 1911 and a revolver, though, I'd take the revolver in a heartbeat.

1) I don't like manual safeties.
2) In the .357, I can load .38s for normal use and .357s for going into the woods. The .45 won't have the same penetration against large predators.
3) You are right, the revolver can have the power in a smaller package than the 1911, unless you're talking a compact frame.
4) I can get a Ruger that works fantastic for less than a "cheap" (in price) and cheap (in quality) 1911.

The advantages of the 1911 are faster reload and the trigger, but I'd personally rather have a revolver.

But, like I said, compact double-stack 9 >>>>>>> revolver > 1911 for most carry use, IMHO.

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 05:18 PM
and I think part of the point is ....we all look at this issue differently ...

....whether we've been considering these options for only a year ....or in my case, for over 40 yrs....

bikerdoc
December 12, 2012, 05:34 PM
i have been shooting revolvers and 1911's since 64. I am proficient and comfortable with either in my role as a civilian, retired old man.
I practice, train, and use situational awareness so I don't have to use it.

KC&97TA
December 12, 2012, 05:54 PM
To each his own... Revolver vs Single Stack Auto vs Double Stack Auto debate / threads never grow old. A good Revolver just has a nice feel, as does a 1911... The plastic gunz with high capacity double stacks are nice to 'grab' as well. Reliability for the revolver can not be debated; although the plastic-fantastic crowd has the capacity won hands down... a nice sloppy 1911 series 70 is iconic over any modern multi manufactured trend 1911. With all that said, it's great to have options... so go on down to the LGS and drop a MasterCard, buy several of them, self defense is priceless and the world ends in 9 days.

Just like anything with options and opinions...

Stub or 4" revolver for everyday carry, I'd like to get a 3" lately

1911 5" or 4" for BBQ's, Wal-Mart, general shopping adventures and open carry

Glock 19 + 5 full magazines for vacations / traveling unknown places

Skribs
December 12, 2012, 05:58 PM
KC, I would argue that revolvers don't have the legendary reliability that most revolver advocates would suggest. I've seen a revolver fail to function to the point where the cylinder won't even turn.

Plastic-Fantastics aren't the only high-cap autos.

45_auto
December 12, 2012, 06:12 PM
You'll find that the vast majority of semi-auto problems are caused by moving the ammo/brass around. Revolvers don't have failures to feed, failures to extract, stovepipes, or double feeds while trying to fire. You've eliminated a whole class of possible failures.

You still have the possibility of mechanical failures or bad ammo (squibs) on either platform, but the chances of those are about equal (very low).

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 06:18 PM
KC, I will take issue with your characterization ....that the older model 70 series 1911's are somehow iconic ...over today's 1911's....

While the 1911 was still the sidearm for the US Military when I was in the service....the old loose and rattle on a 1911 in those days, did not add to its reliability or accuracy in my opinion....

the modern day 1911's ...whether they be series 70's or 80's ( companies like Wilson Combat still make series 70's today )...and well made and well tuned 1911's today - especially from companies like Wilson Combat, Ed Brown and Nighhawk...are some of the best and most accurate and most reliable guns made today.

I take care of my guns ...but my 1911 ( a 5" Wilson combat gun in 9mm) ...in a 3 day tactical defense class I took in the early Fall ...where we fired about 6,000 rds in 3 days...was one of the few guns that did not have a failure during the class. There were a number of poly frame semi-autos...that broke sights off, broke triggers, broke springs or had mag issues...over the 3 day period / out of about 15 shooters in the class - and there were 2 of us shooting 1911's - the other guy had a Springfield that also ran 100%.

orionengnr
December 12, 2012, 08:00 PM
Why choose 1911 over a revolver?
Because I shoot a 1911 better than anything else...bar none.
Why choose either when you can have BOTH?
You can have both...(and I do) but very few carry both (at the same time).
So in the end, you still have to choose.

Ken70
December 12, 2012, 08:12 PM
The 1911, when you run out of ammo, it's a lot better club upside the head than a revolver...You can really brain them with a 1911.

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 08:16 PM
Why would I ever run out of ammo with a 1911....I have 8+1 rds in a 5" gun in .45 acp....in one mag....

I have 9 rds ...so it means there would be at least 5 or 6 of the bad guys dead or severly injured and down ...( and I might still have a round or two left )....:confused:

627PCFan
December 12, 2012, 08:18 PM
Tell that to the guy with the 44oz nframe

StrawHat
December 12, 2012, 08:35 PM
Because my #1 concern with ANY defensive weapon is proficiency and it just so happens that I'm most proficient with 1911s.
Great answer, the only difference I make is that revolvers work better for me so I carry a 4" N frame chambered in 45 ACP. I tried to like the1911 but never got the same warm fuzzy feeling that the N frame gives me so I sold the 1911.

TheReiver
December 12, 2012, 08:47 PM
Given my horrific experiences with 1911s, I would be much more comfortable with a wheel gun if none of my own sidearms were available. This logic of "if x number of rounds won't do it then I'm screwed anyway" is worrisome to me. Considering the plethora of advantages to having extra mags/loaders, it makes less sense not to carry one IMO.

The chance that you'll be encountered by a gang of thugs rather than a lone one is increasing daily. I'll put up with being labeled "paranoid" or "mall ninja" for the sake of my own peace of mind :)

BigJimP
December 12, 2012, 09:01 PM
If capacity is really a worry ....all you have to do is put a 2 mag carrier on the other side of your belt....for any 1911...

most all of us practice with mag carriers every week ....I just don't feel like I need to carry one ...but if you do, that's ok too..../ again they're slim, so they're easy to slip onto a belt...

I prefer Kramer horsehide leather holsters...and their mag carriers...they're real secure - but hold their shape.
-------------
But I also get the point that some folks have had really bad reliability issues with 1911's....and all I'm saying is not all 1911's are that way ...if you keep them clean and well lubed ...and they are well made and well tuned. My primary carry gun is a Wilson CQB that has run 100% right out of the box, when it was new over 10 yrs ago now...and I still have no issues with it (other than changing springs) and it has well over 25,000 rds thru it now easily....so they can be very good guns !

But everybody should carry what they like ...not what I like....

Tcruse
December 12, 2012, 09:55 PM
I think that you need to fit the gun to the task. For SD, a high round count in a simple package (no safety or external hammer) has some real advantages. Should you need to justify a SD shooting, a trigger under about 5# would be a talking point against you. Same goes for caliber, something that matches the FBI published guide line is easiest to justify. Using SD ammo, 9, .40, .45ACP, .357SIG, .45GAP all match the FBI specs. For putting holes in paper at the range, pick what ever you like best. There is no doubt that some find a revolver or 1911 as a more hansom gun than say a Glock. There are a few 1911 guns that I hold in high regard, but still not something for carry. In an emergency I want simple, point, pull trigger, hit target operation.
As far as DAO revolvers, just never found one that I want to own or shoot.

Kayaker 1960
December 12, 2012, 11:18 PM
My carry gun for many years was a Ruger SP101 with 2-1/4" barrel. .357, 5 shots. With a descent holster it's so comfortable I sometimes forgot I had it on. I have a Colt Commander 1911, .45 It's a beautiful gun but it's a bit heavy to carry, I would never forget it was there. Two years ago I picked up a S&W M&P 40c, With 11 rounds of .40 it weighs the same as the SP101 with 5 rounds of .357 and just as comfortable to carry.
I'll keep the Ruger because my wife if comfortable with it, Lots of times I've left her in camp by a river while I've gone whitewater kayaking with friends. I always leave her with the Ruger. If I can get a fair price for the Colt, it's for sale.

orionengnr
December 12, 2012, 11:21 PM
As BigJim said, whichever handgun you shoot well and have confidence in...is a good choice to carry.

Round count < hit count.

Rexster
December 13, 2012, 02:48 AM
Why one over the other? I like both, and often carry one of each at the same time.

RinkRat
December 13, 2012, 03:49 AM
Personally I prefer simplicity. The fewer safeties to deal with the better. I could deal with a manual flip-switch safety but I don't care for the beaver-tang < is that what it's called > grip safety. So I don't care for 1911's for that one and only reason. If by chance under a stressful situation I don't get a firm grip and engage it then it wouldn't go boom?

So if I had to only choose between a wheely or 1911, I'd go with the wheely.

YMWV

Sergei Mosin
December 13, 2012, 05:45 AM
RinkRat, if your grip on a 1911 doesn't disengage the grip safety, you haven't gripped it firmly enough to keep the thing from flying out of your hand if it did discharge. The grip safety is the last thing I'd worry about - draw the gun, the grip safety is off. It doesn't require any conscious thought or additional action on your part.

Now I don't like the big beavertails or ducktails myself - I prefer the short GI version - but that's a fit thing. The grip safety itself isn't a problem.

TimboKhan
December 13, 2012, 05:11 PM
I like shooting autos, and I love the .45. But, if I had to choose one over the other, it would be a revolver. The simple reason for that is caliber. I love the .45, but I really love the .357. I don't have to choose, so I own and shoot both autos and wheelguns reasonably well.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

tuj
December 13, 2012, 05:17 PM
#1 reason is an infinitely better trigger.

+1. DA triggers, especially on revolvers, tend to suck.

RinkRat, if your grip on a 1911 doesn't disengage the grip safety, you haven't gripped it firmly enough to keep the thing from flying out of your hand if it did discharge.

+1. The grip safety, when properly setup, is nice and springy but doesn't require much pressure at all to deactivate.

BlindJustice
December 13, 2012, 05:41 PM
I have a S&W Model 60 .357 Mag 3" bbl.. adj. rear sight
I may or may not shoot a cylinder full of .357, usually just
38 Special at the range. Carry load is Double Tap
38Special +P 125 gr Gold Dots

I did have a S&W 686P 4" bbl. - lots of muzzleflash
I had the Milt Sparks #AW200 holster which compared
to the Milt Sparks #Axiom for my 1911, they both rode
about the same w/FBI Cant and the 686 had Guy Hogue
Medium profile/size checkerred // finger grooved Rosewood
Grips so it was marginally less apt to print with a vest or
untucked shirt Ended up selling it to a good friend because
he isn'tgetting any younger and wasn'tenjoying shooting his
S&W 29/44 magnum

I carry the 1911, .45 ACP - easier to shoot twice or more the
number of rounds compared to 357 mag loads. slimmer in profile
it's the with of the cylinder that'ssider than S&W L & N frames.


I also enjoy shooting a S&W 625 5" Bbl. .45 ACP w/moon cllips
but also have some heavy .45 Auto Rim and speedloaders for it.
Joy to shoot at the range, pre-load the moon clips at home
but it is 45 oz. empty ( compared to 38 oz for my full size
Stainless SW1911 Carrying concealed would be problematic
perhaps a vertical shoulder rig. with spare moon/speedloaders
under arm opposite the holster.

R-

bowserb
December 13, 2012, 06:43 PM
I apologize for not remembering the source of this info. The guy who collected it was on Tom Gresham's radio show back in April. His findings were based on a couple thousand shootings by LEOs and civilians, good guys and bad guys. He reported on some of his stats. [BTW, if anyone remembers who this was, I'd sure like to look him up. I was in the car when I heard it and couldn't write down--or remember--the guy's name or website.] Here's what he reported:

1. Statistics say you're going to miss more times than you hit. They also say that on average 2-3 hits are necessary to stop a bad guy with a handgun, regardless of caliber. That says to me, I may have to shoot six or seven rounds in order to stop one attacker.

2. Larger calibers have a slight edge in that more--but still very, very few--cases of one shot stops were found in the study with big bullets--.45 and larger.

3. Smaller calibers had a disadvantage in that more cases of the party who was shot never being stopped were found with small rounds.

Given those statistics, my inclination is to avoid really small rounds and low capacities. For quite a while, I carried a full size Colt XSE with 8+1 rounds of .45acp, for the same reason some others here have expressed--I can shoot it better than other handguns. However, I have recently gone back to my Springfield Armory XDm-45 4.5" with 13+1 rounds of .45acp. Yes, it has a typical striker gun trigger. Yes, it has a large grip, even with the smallest backstrap. And yes, it's hard to find a good IWB holster for that gun.

But...that XDm deals pretty well with accomplishing what I think I need in a self defense handgun, statistically speaking: good capacity without reload and not too small a bullet. It also weighs 5 oz. less with 14 rds than the Colt with 9.

el Godfather
December 14, 2012, 12:01 AM
Grip safety is like butter. May be RinkR would like to explain further why is he not able to disengage it.

mitchz
December 14, 2012, 11:34 PM
I must say "Good job" to everyone that replied to this thread, allot of good imformation, experiance and opinions. The one thing I can add is if you are really into .357 you must have a Coonan 1911. After breakin and a spring change to tune it to my reloads it fires flawlessly. But my headboard still has my revolver in it.

RinkRat
January 8, 2013, 05:26 PM
Sergei Mosin

I know what you are talking about what I meant was in a stressful situation if you do not have a good-grip on the handle or end up grappling for control then the safety might not engage. If that is the case then it will flop out of my hand anyways. Just one less thing to worry about.

g_one
January 8, 2013, 06:35 PM
I have never cared at all for a DA revolver trigger - personally I find them incredibly annoying and so I only shoot SA at the range, which is precisely why I wouldn't trust myself with a revolver in a SD situation. But that says nothing about the revolver, only that I personally don't care for it. With enough practice dry firing and at the range, anyone can become proficient enough with even the worst triggers to the point that they don't notice anymore. It's just not for me.

At the gun range shooting SA, my Dan Wesson .357 is my favorite. In my home, in my truck, my 1911 is my favorite. In my pocket, out in the city, my Glock 26 is my favorite. It's all about personal preference and whatever you get yourself used to.

g_one
January 8, 2013, 06:38 PM
The one thing I can add is if you are really into .357 you must have a Coonan 1911. After breakin and a spring change to tune it to my reloads it fires flawlessly.

Sorry for the double post but +1 for this. I don't own one but if I had the money I'd own two. One to shoot and one to tuck away.

StrawHat
January 9, 2013, 08:47 AM
Interesting that a couple of posters have complaints about DA triggers on revolvers. I, and most other revolver competitors, shoot DA for score. It gives more control and a better sight picture.

I wonder what revolvers they are complaining about and waht practice they have done with them?

Also, some posters don't feel comfortable with the SA trigger on a revolver but can use a 1911. Just shows there is a handgun for everyone, just not the same one for everyone.

1911 guy
January 9, 2013, 09:51 AM
My reason for choosing a 1911 over anything else, including a revolver, is two-fold. First, it fits my hands like JMB measured me when he designed it. Feels comfortable in my hand and points intuitively. Secondly, between my personal preference and often having an option between an M9 and a 1911, I've got several decades of use under my belt and this just more firmly reinforces the first point.

jp0319
January 9, 2013, 10:03 AM
1911 is much thinner, has a better trigger, higher capacity, can be fired faster, and has better ergos than a revolver. A .357 revolver with a 7-8 round cylinder is FAT like 2 inches or slightly more. A .357 arguably is maybe a more powerful cartridge but I can conceal a 1911 or any of my current polymer 45s much easier. For me ease of carry between the two is the big issue.

huntershooter
January 9, 2013, 12:02 PM
There is no handgun easier to shoot RAPIDLY and ACCURATELY than a 1911.
No revolver comes close.
There are gifted individuals that can shoot a revolver better than MOST can shoot a 1911-but you don't see them winning HOA in IPSC/IDPA and I don't see any revolvers carried by the "special teams" in the service.

460Kodiak
January 9, 2013, 12:26 PM
+1. DA triggers, especially on revolvers, tend to suck.


I just don't understand posts like this. What kinds of revolvers have you shot?

Every Smith, or even broken in Ruger trigger I've ever squeezed has been super smooth. I haven't had the pleasure of shooting a Colt yet.

Are these Taurus, Rossi, or Charter Arms triggers that suck so bad? Not bashing, just asking.

EBK
January 9, 2013, 06:45 PM
In the CCW role I would choose a 1911 over a .357 revolver for 2 reasons.

1) The width of a revolver is more than the width of a 1911

2) Should it be needed a reload can be performed quicker with a magazine than with speed strips or speed loaders (this is from my experiance, of course with training this can be just as quick.)

Vern Humphrey
January 9, 2013, 07:35 PM
The M1911 because thousands and thousands of Phillipinos, Hatians, Mexicans, Nicaraguans, Germans, Russians, Japanese, North Koreans and Viet Cong can't be wrong.

C0untZer0
January 9, 2013, 07:39 PM
^ :D

meanmrmustard
January 10, 2013, 08:04 AM
Someone has never fired a Walther P99AS or PPQ.
Or a newer Ruger SR9.

orionengnr
January 10, 2013, 07:46 PM
Because I shoot a 1911 better than anything else...good enough? ;)

wow6599
January 10, 2013, 08:47 PM
Because I'm a bottom feeder....

xXxplosive
January 10, 2013, 08:55 PM
Not to cause a fire storm here but.....even though I love all my Colt Pre 80 1911's......I would never trade my S&W Model 36.....it saved my arse twice.

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