Corrosive ammo


PDA






ephraimf
December 12, 2012, 12:42 AM
How can you tell whether ammo is corrosive or not?:confused: Do you have to worry about modern handgun ammo being corrosive?

TIA
--Ephraim

If you enjoyed reading about "Corrosive ammo" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Jorg Nysgerrig
December 12, 2012, 12:57 AM
You aren't likely to run into corrosive modern handgun ammo. It's mainly surplus stuff you need to worry about.

Ky Larry
December 12, 2012, 07:35 AM
It doesn't matter if it's corrosive or not. Just remember:" Never let the sun set on a dirty weapon" and your guns will be fine.

Sav .250
December 12, 2012, 07:45 AM
Do some more home-work on the subject. Check out the web.

brnmw
December 12, 2012, 08:32 AM
You aren't likely to run into corrosive modern handgun ammo. It's mainly surplus stuff you need to worry about.

True. Surplus for sure, and many companies that sell the ammo will usually have something that says "corrosive" or "Lightly corrosive", not always but I do see it more now than I used to. Commercial brands.... no, I have yet to come across one that is.

It doesn't matter if it's corrosive or not. Just remember:" Never let the sun set on a dirty weapon" and your guns will be fine.

Agreed look at some past posts in a search to see different methods suggested in cleaning the corrosive ammo residue from your gun and don't take a chance if you even suspect it to be corrosive.

JustinJ
December 12, 2012, 08:52 AM
It doesn't matter if it's corrosive or not. Just remember:" Never let the sun set on a dirty weapon" and your guns will be fine.

Modern firearms should experience no corrosion by not immediately cleaning after shooting non-corrosive ammo.

Second, if the ammo is corrosive cleaning after shooting will not prevent corrosion unless proper cleaning methods are performed. Primarily a water based solvent must be used.

leadchucker
December 12, 2012, 12:03 PM
How can you tell whether ammo is corrosive or not?
You really can't tell by just looking at it unless you can identify where and when it was made. As has been said, if it's surplus, or old, suspect that it's corrosive. Otherwise, don't worry about it.

Do you have to worry about modern handgun ammo being corrosive?
No.

Trent
December 12, 2012, 12:08 PM
If you shoot corrosive ammunition your "standard" cleaning regimen won't work. (CLP generally doesn't remove what needs to get removed).

Water & Soap. Ballistol. Windex. Etc.. many options for cleaning a firearm after shooting corrosive ammunition.

Just be glad you're not shooting corrosive ammo through a belt fed. It takes me several evenings to get them cleaned right. Carbon gets baked on to some parts, with the corrosive crap embedded in it, and it usually takes me several passes to "get it all". Not to mention traces of it get EVERYWHERE inside the firearm, and getting every nook and cranny is tough; so I have to check daily for spotting before calling it "good" to store. Forcing cones and other parts of German MG-xx guns are particularly troublesome, very time consuming and difficult to get 100% clean. Inside the PKM gas port is another trouble spot, thing is a royal pain in the butt to get the baked crud out of there. :(

SuperXOne
December 12, 2012, 12:22 PM
There's been no corrosive primered ammo made for civilian use in the United States since World War Two. But if you start shooting imported surplus ammo, or even by chance find some very old US surplus military ammo it's very likely to have corrosive priming, and as Trent states,,,you can't just wipe your gun down with your favorite gun CLP and call it good. It takes several passes with a cleaner that has soap and water, and ammonia doesn't hurt either,,over several days,,,to get corrosive primer residue out of any firearm. GI bore cleaner is good for cleaning out corrosive priming, but it requires elbow grease and persistence.

Mildly corrosive is corrosive. Stay away from shooting corrosive ammo of any kind in your firearm unless you are willing to clean the firearm properly.

The primers in corrosive ammo deposit a salt in the bore and everywhere else in the gun, and that salt will draw moisture and your gun will rust if you don't completely clean out the residue with the proper cleaner.

JustinJ
December 12, 2012, 12:25 PM
Carbon gets baked on to some parts, with the corrosive crap embedded in it, and it usually takes me several passes to "get it all".

I've wondered about this and tend to think scrubbing out all the carbon is not necessary. It's pretty much impossible to remove it all from the gas tube of an AK and simply rinsing with a water based cleaner has so far worked for me.

Trent
December 12, 2012, 01:13 PM
Justin;

I ran across this on one of my AK-74's this year. Last time it was shot with corrosive 7N6 about 5 years ago. It was shot, cleaned thoroughly with water, oiled put away. Checked yearly (on my annual Thanksgiving week cleaning frenzy). Four years running, showed nothing, re-oiled each year.

THIS year I got it out and found a fair amount of rust inside the gas tube, gas block. Also some rust on the inside of the flash hider, which had previously been spotless. There was no rust anywhere else on the rifle (barrel, inside or out, receiver, inside or out).

The difference is earlier this year I moved the location it was stored - out of a humidity controlled environment and in to a place that was NOT climate controlled. The rust would have happened a long time ago if it hadn't been stored in a dry environment. Just needed moisture to start up again. Rust ONLY appeared where there was still carbon deposits.

On my MG42, I ran a belt of 250 rounds of corrosive ammo through a few months ago. I soaked the forcing cone in soapy water. Scrubbed it good. Dried it. Oiled it. Two days later surface rust was forming in spots where the CLP had evaporated.

So I scrubbed it with water again. Hit it with a brass brush. Dried it. CLP. More brass brush. Two days later, more surface spots formed. Repeat. Same thing again.

Now it's been a week, and I can't get the rifle to stop showing rust. During the week spots of light surface rust also appeared on the inside of the receiver. On the charging handle. On the barrel. 0000 steel wool to clean the rust, water and soap to scrub it thoroughly, compressed air to dry, re-oil each time. After three sessions on the inside and outside of the receiver and barrel, rust quit forming and I applied a thick coat of collectors oil.

(Also of note, I had to remove and completely disassemble the sight assemblies to get under / inside them, because those also showed rust forming; that "corrosive" crap gets EVERYWHERE.)

The problem with the forcing cone and booster was there was baked on crap - both pieces had heavy tool marks, and were very slightly pitted in places when I got it. I had to scrape all of that carbon off, under magnification, one divot at a time. It was a royal pain in the neck, but after I did this, that cone and booster quit rusting.

Same thing happened to the inside of my PKM gas block - I have to check that daily for a week or two after cleaning to make sure it don't start back up again. (It'll start surface rusting even under the oil).

My conclusion from these incidents is that ALL baked on carbon must be removed (scraped, brushed, and spotless), because the corrosive chemicals are embedded with the carbon.

Trent
December 12, 2012, 01:16 PM
Oh, and for what it's worth, I'm not ever shooting corrosive ammo out of that MG again. I'll load / reload my own.

The PKM I don't have much choice on .. 7.62R was so cheap I bought a mountain of it. But it's not nearly as difficult as that MG42 was.

Ky Larry
December 12, 2012, 03:35 PM
JustinJ, please feel free to clean or not clean your weapons. Personally, I clean mine before I put them away. I see no reason to put a weapon back in the safe dirty.
Yes, corrosive salts must be washed off with water or a waterbased cleaner such as Windex. There are several threads on this forum about cleaning methods.

JustinJ
December 12, 2012, 04:58 PM
JustinJ, please feel free to clean or not clean your weapons. Personally, I clean mine before I put them away. I see no reason to put a weapon back in the safe dirty.

Available time is often a good reason not to. Also my range trips can sometimes be less than a week apart and there is no harm in leaving a gun dirty between. There is nothing wrong with cleaning immediately after each shooting session but my point is that it isn't necessary for the vast majority of modern guns. How long one should obviously depends on a number of things such as finish and humidity but generally just applying a coat of oil is sufficient protection for a good while.

wv109323
December 12, 2012, 07:36 PM
The last corrosive ammo produced for the U.S. Military was in 1954. The period from 1952 to 1954 was the change over period. Some ammo produced from 1952 to 1954 is NON-corrosive. It depends on the caliber, date and where it was manufactured. A book on reloading by George Nonte has a chart of what is corrosive and what is not.

medalguy
December 12, 2012, 07:42 PM
I generally consider all Commblock ammo to be corrosive unless I discover otherwise. This is infrequent.

US milsurp after 1960 is always noncorrosive, and there's a chart everywhere on the net with initial production lots of noncorrosive ammo by arsenal and lot number. Actualy there were some lots of match ammo in '06 that are corrosive from 1956 I think. I had the lots identified but have lost the numbers over the years.

Foreign allies vary after WW II-- French is usually corrosive, British WW II is corrosive, lots of post-war Brit is corrosive, most German is corrosive.

I always clean properly if there's even a chance of the ammo being corrosive.

The Lone Haranguer
December 13, 2012, 09:49 AM
The "corrosive" part of corrosive ammo is not in the powder or bullet, but the priming compound (containing potassium chloride, IIRC, which is a salt). No modern ammo is so primed. Old military surplus ammo might be, and even then it would have to be pretty old. If you do shoot such ammo, clean the bore, chamber and (if gas-operated) gas passages or pistons by flooding them with plain old hot water, then dry.

If you enjoyed reading about "Corrosive ammo" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!