m&p 9 or sig 226


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tonytor58
December 14, 2012, 02:55 PM
Just as the title states I have found good prices on both pistols and want a full size gun for competition. The sig is like $150 more than the m&p, but I have this urge to buy the sig cause its on the bucket list. Will the m&p be more practical for idpa? I have shot idpa with my fnp9 and had some trouble with transition fro da to sa. I am open to suggestions outside these two but really have a like for these two.

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1KPerDay
December 14, 2012, 04:01 PM
If you have trouble with the transition go with the one with the consistent trigger.

The SIG P226 is a fantastic pistol, however. My personal favorite. I compete (informally/recreationally) with mine and don't take first place but I generally do okay.

IMO I'd look for a lightly used West German P226... as long as we're bucket-listing.

The Lone Haranguer
December 14, 2012, 04:10 PM
Whichever fits, handles and shoots better for you. Personally, I find that particular SIG much too large for my hands as well as having a very long stroke DA trigger, while the M&P is practically an extension of my arm and hand. I'd try to rent and shoot representative examples of both before committing to $$$.

1KPerDay
December 14, 2012, 04:17 PM
Whichever fits, handles and shoots better for you. (snip) I'd try to rent and shoot representative examples of both before committing to $$$.
Always a good idea. :cool:

9mmepiphany
December 14, 2012, 04:34 PM
I've competed in IDPA with both, but my experience might not mirror yours as both of mine were highly tuned.

I have a lot more years with the SIG, having used it as a duty gun, and have found that the DA/SA transition is highly overblown as an impediment to accurate or fast shooting. I've actually found that my first DA shot, when drawing out of the holster was often more accurate than my followup SA shots.

I'm currently shooting a M&P9 with the Apex Tactical FSS and don't have a problem keeping up with folks shooting their 9mm 1911s in ESP.

The biggest difference that I have found between the two is the speed of transition between targets. The lighter M&P will start and stop faster between targets. The trade off is that a lighter gun will usually jump more as the muzzle flips.

Shot side by side, the 226 will hold a slightly tighter group for me at 20 yards (IDPA Classifier)

If you are shooting untuned models of each in SSP, I think the SIG 226 has a slight edge to begin with as it is a bit easier to shoot accurately and to make follow up shots...plus it is on your bucket list

Corpral_Agarn
December 14, 2012, 04:36 PM
EDIT: ^^+1 and besides, bucket list should always win...
I think you pretty much got what you need for advise. Try both and then go with it!
I am a sig guy, I guess, so I would go with the 226. And a standard one is not that heavy or big for CCW too, if you ever need to. I have small hands and find the 226 pretty shootable and much prefer the DA/SA with no safety.
M&P's have pretty good reps too, so I don't think you can really go wrong here...
Is capacity a concern? i am not sure what the capacity on the M&P is.

9mmepiphany
December 14, 2012, 04:51 PM
i am not sure what the capacity on the M&P is.
In most states, it is 17 + 1; although for IDPA, you'd be limited to 10

tonytor58
December 14, 2012, 05:58 PM
Thanks for the advise I will try to shoot both at a local range first. I am leaning towards tje sig is there anything that can improve the da/ sa trigger on the 226 like the apex on the m&p?

Corpral_Agarn
December 14, 2012, 06:12 PM
Thanks for the advise I will try to shoot both at a local range first. I am leaning towards tje sig is there anything that can improve the da/ sa trigger on the 226 like the apex on the m&p?
I have a "Short Reach" trigger on mine. All it does is give my small hands a better reach on the trigger so I can use the pad of my finger a little easier.
They also make the "Short Reset" trigger for the SA shots. That usually comes standard with the "Upper" versions of the 226 but you can buy the kit from places like Midway USA.
The best thing to do would be to send it off to Gray Guns for a working over, but that's expensive.
Some people say you can put a lighter spring in it to reduce the pull weight of the DA, but i wouldn't recommend it. As long as the DA is smooth the 10lbs shouldn't be too much trouble. I find mine quite controllable and accurate.

tonytor58
December 14, 2012, 06:23 PM
Thanks corp, I think the next step is to shoot them. I dont know if ill ne able to pass up the good deal on an m&p, but I am gonna look into finding someone with an m&p and 226 to shoot.

Robbins290
December 14, 2012, 06:29 PM
i would go with the sig. you wont regret it

tonytor58
December 15, 2012, 04:30 PM
Robbins, what about the sig makes you say that? Im just curious because i dont have one.

Jim Watson
December 15, 2012, 04:44 PM
I have a Burwell Plastic M&P and a Gray P226.
Of the two, I do better with the M&P.
It is not just the crunch-tick, I do not mind a CZ-75 DA-SA. Or a revolver for that matter.

I sure wish Bruce would find a way to put a thumb safety on my Sig.

allaroundhunter
December 15, 2012, 04:53 PM
I shoot an M&P, but if I had the chance to get a Sig P226 for only $150 more than I paid for my M&P....well, I would have a Sig in the holster for competition from then on.

jimbo555
December 15, 2012, 06:01 PM
I bought a m&p9 fs for about half of what a p226 costs in my neck of the woods.Another plus for me is the weight difference,about 10ounces lighter for the m&p.

Shuler13
December 15, 2012, 07:27 PM
Your talking already about an M&P and the APEX kit ($100). Why not just take the one that doesn't require the Kit for what amounts to $50 more?

Fremmer
December 16, 2012, 01:00 AM
Because he doesn't like a transition from da to sa.
I tried a stock m&p a couple of weeks ago and I was impressed.

Robbins290
December 16, 2012, 08:56 AM
I shot both. The ergo's are way better on the p226. The 226 has less noticeable recoil. It's a little more money. But I think it's worth it. Everyone I know that has a m&p and used it for major target practice, that had to being it back to smith and Wesson for things breaking. Like frame lugs, cracked slides, sights falling off. Thet fixed it for free but they couldn't use the pistol for a month till they got it back. My brother had his sig for 5 years now and beat the snot out of his. Puts over 10k rounds a year and twice that in dry fires. Never had a issue with the P226. I sold my m9 and s&w for the p226. Never. Looked back and regretted it.

powder
December 16, 2012, 10:04 PM
I tried a 9 Pro and could not get over the trigger hinge, as I use gloves quite a bit, and got a little pissed that it would need APEX kits to bring it online.

Picked up a used 226 last winter before going to a SIG Armorer school. (Summit gun broker.) Tore it down, dropped in a fresh parts kit and an SRT. Amazing pistol. I was going to got all out on a TAC OPS 226 but could not swallow the price, even with LE Discount. Glad I went used and refurbed it myself. She's a keeper, scuffed a bit and I don't mind. Go 226.

BigJimP
December 17, 2012, 08:18 PM
Of your 2 choices, I favor the 226 as well....because it fits my hands better, and I like the trigger better ...and the controls better on it than the M&P ....

but to the point, there is no "mechanical reason" to pick one over the other ...they're both solid guns..

What matters - is what fits your hands the best, what controls you like, which trigger you like....rent or shoot as many of the guns you think you like as you can -- and figure out which one you like the best.

pat701
December 18, 2012, 10:56 PM
If you can afford it get the SIG. Better get it yesterday because an AWB is coming. Act fast what ever you do.

Rinspeed
December 18, 2012, 11:53 PM
If it were me I'd buy an older 226 just because there are so many good deals out there on used pistols, that and prices have climbed so high in the last five or six years.

Old Dog
December 19, 2012, 08:09 PM
My duty pistol is the M&P. I'm also a firearms instructor. I carry a SIG.

Sheepdog1968
December 19, 2012, 08:19 PM
Whichever fits, handles and shoots better for you. Personally, I find that particular SIG much too large for my hands as well as having a very long stroke DA trigger, while the M&P is practically an extension of my arm and hand. I'd try to rent and shoot representative examples of both before committing to $$$.
This.

BILLG
December 20, 2012, 01:08 AM
Everyone I know that has a m&p and used it for major target practice, that had to being it back to smith and Wesson for things breaking. Like frame lugs, cracked slides, sights falling off. Thet fixed it for free but they couldn't use the pistol for a month till they got it back. My brother had his sig for 5 years now and beat the snot out of his. Puts over 10k rounds a year and twice that in dry
I would like to see some documentation on the above stated M&P problems.:)

Oldnoob
December 20, 2012, 02:24 AM
Sig

Infidel4life11
December 20, 2012, 12:03 PM
M&P hands down I love that pistol

mach1.3
December 20, 2012, 03:12 PM
I have both pistols. I've got a Sig P226DP in 9mm. It came with a short trigger and E2 grips new. I've got a P226 in .40S&W with the regular trigger.
I love both guns but prefer the 9mm for range use--it fits my hand slightly better. I also have (2) MPs, one a MP9c and the other the regular size MP in .45acp with a thumb safety. I like all my pistols--haven't had any problems with either brand. The trigger on the MPs doesn't bug me at all I kinda like the way it hinges and breaks. I CC the MP9c often. The MP45 full size is my glovebox gun. I have numerous Sigs: 238,239,229,220s,226s, 228 and have a used P210 and a new M11 on the way. My compact 220 fits into it's holster like a glove but isn't stuck in there---I love .45s so it get some CC with the 220c also at times and I do like the SA mode with safety. I'm used to the DA/SA Sig but the DA trigger requires more effort to squeeze and therefore is less target solid for the initial shot.

Whichever, gun you decide on---practice with it extensively and train yourself in it's mechanics until it's second nature. Being highly trained, familiar with the controls and at ease with handling your gun is the most safety related thing you can do. Whether you like old school safety levers, DAO/DAK, DA/SA or SAO triggers makes no difference the accuracy will come but safety is FIRST IN IMPORTANCE!

My mantra is buy one--if you wonder about the other--buy it--have it all. You only go around once.


"Everybody has a plan, until they get hit." M. Tyson

SwampWolf
December 20, 2012, 09:21 PM
and have found that the DA/SA transition is highly overblown as an impediment to accurate or fast shooting.

This observation is so true in my experience. The so-called difficulty in transitioning from da to sa was the biggest objection pistol guru Jeff Cooper had to "traditional" da pistols but a minimal training regimen will obviate any such drawback, imagined or otherwise.

9mmepiphany
December 20, 2012, 11:10 PM
This observation is so true in my experience. The so-called difficulty in transitioning from da to sa was the biggest objection pistol guru Jeff Cooper had to "traditional" da pistols but a minimal training regimen will obviate any such drawback, imagined or otherwise.
That was the turning point in my handgun shooting journey where I started to question things I had always accepted as being true. I greatly expanded my ability to learn and opened my mind to techniques that made me a better shooter

f4t9r
December 20, 2012, 11:19 PM
For that price difference Sig all the way, plus it's on the bucket list

U-235
December 22, 2012, 07:26 PM
Since it's on your bucket list go with the SIG. I don't have any experience with an M&P but I have a P-226. I bought it in the early 90's, I wanted a high cap semiauto before the 1994 AWB went into effect. It is a great gun. Straight shooter and absolutely reliable.

hey.moe
December 24, 2012, 07:11 PM
I love my P226 and shoot it regularly in IDPA. That said, the most popular guns at my local club matches are M&Ps and Glocks.

-Stan-

Walt Sherrill
December 25, 2012, 01:36 PM
... The so-called difficulty in transitioning from da to sa was the biggest objection pistol guru Jeff Cooper had to "traditional" da pistols but a minimal training regimen will obviate any such drawback, imagined or otherwise.

As an IDPA safety officer (who also helped score targets) at MANY IDPA matches over a period of years, I will affirm that training (or practice) will minimize the DASA transition problem, but there is almost always a difference in the points of impact between the first and subsequent shots.

The differences are greater with the less experienced shooters, and much less noticeable with folks who have worked on the transaction. Are the differences great ENOUGH to matter? Probably not -- as we're talking about inches, not feet. If the first shot is on target, the other shots are going to be hitting something that's vital, too.

I've got a Gray Guns-tuned P228 that is superb, and a Speed Specialties-tuned M&P Pro. I shoot the M&P Pro S&W better in competition than the P228; others might have different results. I think I'd probably feel better with the P228 as a carry gun, but I've not carried either -- believe it or not, I carry a Kel-Tec P9 when I carry...

jawman
December 25, 2012, 01:52 PM
The #1 thing you should look for when getting a pistol is how it feels in your hand. My first pistol was a Sig 226 and while it is an excellent gun, the grip is too big for me and it does not fit as comfortably in my hand as the M&Ps do. I shoot the M&Ps much better, therefore I am getting an M&P as my next handgun. If the gun feels comfortable and solid in the hands and you can get a great grip on it and you like the way it feels better than all the other guns you have tested, get that gun. You'll know which one just "feels right" when you pick it up. To me, that is the #1 thing I look for. As long as I get that part right, everything else will come in training. Check out Sigs, M&P, Glock, Springfield XDM, Walther, etc. Whichever one feels best, get it.

wally
December 25, 2012, 05:51 PM
I've helped a few new shooters choose their first 9mm pistol by taking them to the range with the ones I have that they are considering.

SIG226 vs. M&P is a common dilemma, all have preferred the SIG until I had them shoot it DA/SA, then they go with a Glock or M&P.

Unless you are coming from a revolver, its going to take a fair amount of practice to make that first DA shot be as effective as the first shot from an M&P or Glock.

The #1 thing you should look for when getting a pistol is how it feels in your hand.

The #1 thing is how well you shoot it!

I find "hand feel" to be misleading as often as its helpful. If at all possible try to find a range rental if you've got no buddies with examples to try.

jbm0207
December 26, 2012, 10:59 PM
I probably like the M&P better for competition. The consistency of the trigger will be easier for you to master for follow up shots as there is no transition between trigger pulls.

BILLG
December 27, 2012, 12:26 AM
I have both and while I like the M&P I prefer the 226.People make way to big of deal about the transition between da/sa trigger pull.Dry fire practice in the evenings will work wonders.And although I like the M&P I just don't like striker fired pistols all that much.This coming from a guy who has 5 M&Ps.I also just like the solid feel of an all metal pistol.

jawman
December 28, 2012, 12:23 AM
The #1 thing is how well you shoot it!

Yes, and in my experience, if a gun feels very comfortable and you can get a good, solid grip on it, you can run it well. Every gun that I've ever shot that didn't feel the nicest in my hand, I didn't shoot as well as the ones that I picked up and felt great when I gripped it. YMMV.

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