Meds Link to Violence


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DeMilled
December 18, 2012, 03:58 PM
I thought I would share this site with you guys as a resource to use when writing to our officials and discussing ways to counter the argument that guns lead to violence.

http://www.ssristories.com/index.html#FromIndex

It's includes the news articles and journals from medical professionals and should give you the who/what/when of the events. Good stuff for putting facts into your arguments.


I think this is the answer to the question "This used to never be a problem, kids used to have the same access, even more in fact, to guns but didn't commit these acts."


Please add links to any recent medical studies you know of that address this topic.

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chineseboxer
December 18, 2012, 04:05 PM
It's more than this. These are the most widely prescribed drug on the planet. The percentages of these helping people is incredible. You can lump in general anxiety patients with nut jobs on the same meds.

rem44m
December 18, 2012, 04:19 PM
I've always felt physicians over prescribe and under diagnose.

It's sad, but mental health takes a backseat/non-existent seat to all sorts of "issues" in the political agenda and media, including the facade that gun control will stop things like sandy hook.

chineseboxer
December 18, 2012, 09:24 PM
I actuaqlly meant to say you "can't" lump them together

DeMilled
December 19, 2012, 12:07 PM
Here is a confirmation the shooter was on dangerous meds.

We really need to make this more widely known and get people talking about the cause of the kids behavior in the many shootings over the past several years.

http://www.businessinsider.com/adam-lanza-taking-antipsychotic-fanapt-2012-12

A few facts about the drug.
http://doublecheckmd.com/EffectsDetail.do?dname=Fanapt&sid=164543&eid=2127

tuj
December 19, 2012, 02:54 PM
Whoa whoa whoa!!!!!

SSRI's and SNRI's are not the same class of drugs as anti-psychotics!!!!!! That's like saying a real full-auto M-16 and a Ruger 10/22 are both assault weapons. Iloperidone is an atypical anti-psychotic, not an SSRI or SNRI.

Secondly, schizophrenia is not the same as depression, which is not the same as bipolar.

saltydog452
December 19, 2012, 03:18 PM
All meds have side effects. If you read available literature, it'd be likely that you look at Asprin or Ice Cream with a skeptical eye.

Wellbutrin, an anti-depressent, helped me to, finally, to get off the nicotine drug addiction.

Just a wild guess, but wouldn't you think that depressents lead to more anti-social (violent) behavior than anti-depressents?

Too easy to blame genetic wiring or circumstance to justify anti-social actions.

We deserve the blame, or applause, for our culture. Don't blame it on the meds.

Jerry

bikerdoc
December 19, 2012, 03:35 PM
Just like we cant fix stupid without education, we cant fix crazy without meds.

It is when we as society fail to address these problems that we get negative results. When families and schools ignore the warning signs we get negative results. When doctors are reluctant to give kid a psychiatric diagnosis we get negative results.
We spend more on animal control than mental health.

Ya'all do realize the last 4 major incidents were committed by young men who had a diagnosis and the system moved too slow.
Just saying.

WardenWolf
December 19, 2012, 03:45 PM
As someone who is highly familiar with the effects of SSRIs, I will testify that it is absolutely critical to observe and listen to the person being treated, regardless of their age. Some of them can result in psychotic behavior in certain individuals. It's not a common effect, but the one I hear that keeps coming up is Zoloft. If a person doesn't feel right or their personality changes, even if they are no longer depressed and it's past the first week or two, it's the wrong med.

A person who needs antidepressants is not inherently a risk to themselves or others, as long as their depression is properly treated and controlled. This is why the current mental health system evaluates on a case-by-case basis. However, there needs to be careful observation with their initial use until it's known they've found the "right" med. You can't just prescribe a med and turn them loose with no followup visits for 6 months, regardless of whether it is a child or an adult.

DeMilled
December 19, 2012, 04:15 PM
I'm going to refine and clarify my position here.




There are many medications that are given to young people which carry the risk of specific side effects. The side effects are well documented and they are bad.

In many of the recent cases where young people have killed a lot of other young people the assailant was on medications known to have side effects which explain their behavior.

There are thousands of patients that these medications have helped.

There are many patients that have been harmed by the medications.

Many children have been killed by the patients that the medications harmed.

Drug companies spend a lot of money to keep this from being common knowledge.

Politicians turn a blind eye to this problem.

I want to make this information, both that drug companies work to hide this info and the politicians lack of action in investigating this problem, widely known and discussed.

You want to know what's truly terrible? This is not new information...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26e5PqrCePk

In hind sight, I see I was too specific with naming anti-depressants in the thread title. I should have said "Many School Shooters On Dangerous Meds.", or something like that.

Focus everyone's anger at these events where it belongs and our gun rights are no longer the focus of the outrage and grief that currently threatens them; that's my line of thought with sharing this information.

I am not educated enough to debate the nature of these medications.
I will stick to reading doctors reports and peer reviewed medical journals .

Thank you for reading this and I hope you understand my intent with this thread.

kingvillien
December 19, 2012, 04:19 PM
Guess that means we need to have a ban on all "high capacity" norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitors... or may be one on "assault/battle" pill bottles. I'm just following their line of reasoning.

tuj
December 19, 2012, 04:29 PM
Guess that means we need to have a ban on all "high capacity" norepinephrine re-uptake inhibitors

LOL, we already do; a very 'high capacity' SNRI is Lysergic Acid Diethylamide.

saltydog452
December 19, 2012, 05:22 PM
Next time that I feel kinda gimpy, I'll just go out, gimpy or not, and find a Willow Tree and gnaw on the bark for a coupla hours.

Penicillin is Evil. As is Flouride in the Public water system, Mosquito abatement spraying, Merry Widows, and the beat goes on...

salty

DeMilled
December 19, 2012, 05:25 PM
Alrighty, let's get to the planning part here.

How do you think this info could be packaged into a pamphlet/news letter that I can mail to someone?

I don't want to send an e-mail and like the old fashioned piece of paper (with web article addresses in it) that someone can read and it'll stay with them in the literal sense.

I'm not exactly experienced with formatting this sort of thing and there is more info on those sites than I can see a way to distill.

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