Rainbow Vacuum Cleaners for cleaing up reloading residue


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Gaucho Gringo
December 19, 2012, 10:58 PM
I realize this is a rather odd topic but I am going to ask anyway. First of all I realize if you try to vacuum powder residue and especially black powder you are just inviting trouble. But I have two Rainbow/Rexair vacuums that are totally different than other vacuums. For those who are not familiar with them they use a water tank as a filter as opposed to a bag. If I vacuumed up powder residue it would hit the water before even being exposed to a chance of an electrical spark. I just wondered if any other members have used one to clean up reloading residue. Thank you.

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splattergun
December 19, 2012, 11:06 PM
I've seen other posts suggest just that.
I used to sell rainbow vacs, actually ( a long long time ago). I don't see any mechanical reason why it would not be safe. The residue would be trapped in the water.

Float Pilot
December 20, 2012, 12:24 AM
I used to have a Rainbow Vacum that I actually lost in a divorce settlement (daughter of Satan) many years ago. I used it all the time to clean up powder messes. They sure work...

Lost Sheep
December 20, 2012, 02:14 AM
How many people spread a dropcloth under their work area before loading, then take it out to the lawn or garden to shake out any spills?

How many work in an area with a sweepable floor surface?

Lost Sheep

rcmodel
December 20, 2012, 12:33 PM
I just use a shop vac with a sheet rock dust bag.

And I try not to spill enough powder in the first place to worry about it blowing up my shop vac.

rc

oneounceload
December 20, 2012, 12:34 PM
Shop vac works fine for everything (except black powder, which is an explosive, compared to regular powder)

Certaindeaf
December 20, 2012, 12:52 PM
I used to have a nice water filter vac a long time ago. Refinished porcelain etc.
Don't Shop Vac's suck up water no problem? I know it's different but at least it'd wind up in water.. I think.

USSR
December 20, 2012, 01:05 PM
You guys clean?:D

Don

JohnM
December 20, 2012, 01:06 PM
I think the problem with the wet/dry shop vacs is stuff goes by the motor before getting to any water and if the brushes are arcing there's where the problem is.
I still use one in my reloading room, but I'm careful about spilling much.
Too damn expensive to throw away any good powder. :)

medalguy
December 20, 2012, 01:38 PM
I'm with USSR. Once a year, need it or not. :D

rcmodel
December 20, 2012, 01:47 PM
I think the problem with the wet/dry shop vacs is stuff goes by the motor before getting to any water It actually doesn't.

The motor & brushes are in a separate compartment, and sealed from the impeller that creates the vacuum.
And hardly any of the dust go's through the impeller either.

Otherwise, if dust, steel lathe shavings & grinder dust, (or water when sucking up water) got to the motor & brushes all the time, it would have a life expectancy of about 5 minutes, at most.

If wood chips and such went through the impeller, it wouldn't last much longer either.

The danger I see with any type of vacuum is static electricity build-up in the hose.

When sucking large quantities of saw dust out of my table saw for instance.
Static electricity in the hose will knock your socks off about once every 30 seconds.

It's like a mini-lightening storm going on from the static charge.

rc

JohnM
December 20, 2012, 02:15 PM
Yeah, maybe that's it. I just looked in mine again and if the big pleated filter is locked in place nothing can get to the motor, maybe vapors.

SSN Vet
December 20, 2012, 03:16 PM
I have this revelutionary new device that works like a charm and is energy efficient to boot.

It's called a dust pan and a broom.

But I'll crawl around on my hands and knees for 15 min. to find a dropped primer.... because darn it all... that's almost 3 cents.

JohnM
December 20, 2012, 03:20 PM
But I'll crawl around on my hands and knees for 15 min. to find a dropped primer.... because darn it all... that's almost 3 cents

:D I thought I was the only one who did that.

erikk8829
December 20, 2012, 04:03 PM
+2 on both:)

Magnum Shooter
December 20, 2012, 04:04 PM
I have this revelutionary new device that works like a charm and is energy efficient to boot.
It's called a dust pan and a broom.

Thatís my choice, cost less to buy and use, faster, and safer. Looks like a win win win.

morcey2
December 20, 2012, 04:06 PM
I used to have a Rainbow Vacum that I actually lost in a divorce settlement (daughter of Satan) many years ago. I used it all the time to clean up powder messes. They sure work...
Well, that sucks. :)

I use a lint roller to pick up powder around my reloading bench. A rolled-up sheet covered with smokeless powder looks really cool when lit. :)

SSN Vet
December 20, 2012, 04:31 PM
I forgot to mention that this thread is giving me a deja-vu moment...

I rented a single wide trailer home back in my navy days, and the land lord had a Rainbow vac. in the closet....

I had never heard of, nor seen them b4.

Man was that water disgusting when you were all done vacuming.

Either the rugs were filthy, the Rainbow extremely good at catching everything, or both.

Walkalong
December 20, 2012, 04:54 PM
I just use the vacuum cleaner in the hall closet.

Sheldon
December 20, 2012, 11:04 PM
I picked up a nice used Rainbow years ago specifically to capture the tumbler dust off my Dillon media sifter. I made a hood for the sifter out of a big cardboard box and put a hole for the hose to fit into and turn the Rainbow on while rotating the media sifter....works great. I got my Rainbow for $75.

RE-15
December 20, 2012, 11:25 PM
Some of you worry way to much. What's the worse that can happen? Use a dust pan for big spills.

velojym
December 20, 2012, 11:50 PM
I'll agree on the Rainbow (used to sell 'em too, before I had any marketable skills). Its big selling point is that the inbound air (with all the junk in it) is filtered into the water immediately as it enters the tank, the motor being in a different section of the machine.

The biggest issue I had was with the water sometimes getting really---- really... nasty.
We were trained to make it look easier and cleaner than it really was, but it really did work well.

mbopp
December 20, 2012, 11:55 PM
I use my shop vac but I put a HEPA filter in it for the primer residue.

ChefJeff1
December 21, 2012, 01:02 AM
I'm sure my dogs lick it up, they eat everything else they can find.

Twiki357
December 21, 2012, 04:20 AM
I just use a 50+ year old tank type vacuum. Between the paper filter bag inside of a cloth bag, it's not likely that anything is going to get near the motor.

Baryngyl
December 21, 2012, 04:50 AM
:D I thought I was the only one who did that.Me too, but not because its 3 cents but because I can not stand to have 99 loaded rounds in a box.


Michael Grace

Blue68f100
December 21, 2012, 09:56 AM
I just use my shop vac with a HEPA filter on it. They sell a water trap that you can hook up between your shop vac that's used to trap joint compound dust during sanding. All it is is a 5gal bucket with 2 ports on top. One is submerged in the water (about 1/2 way) the other is not. All you do is fill the bucket with water and hook your shop vac and your good to go. I use this when I need to do drywall sanding. It's a cheaper way to go than using the HEPA filter/bags.

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