Venison roast recipe for crock pot?


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JeffDilla
December 26, 2012, 12:12 PM
So here's the deal. I'm a teacher and on vacation. Looks like we're in for over a foot of snow tomorrow, so it'll be a good day to hang around the house and get some stuff done. I'd like to use one of the roasts I have to make a crock pot meal. I've checked the recipe sticky but didn't see anything that jumped out at me.

What slow cooker recipes have you used for deer roasts? Anything to help with the gaminess? I don't mind it but my girlfriend isn't fond of it.

Thanks folks.

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WardenWolf
December 26, 2012, 12:27 PM
Well, the recipe I've heard for gamey meat is, you wrap it in horse crap. Then you cook it, you stew it, you brew it for about 48 hours. Then you throw it out and eat the horse crap. :neener:

1911 guy
December 26, 2012, 02:04 PM
Start by slicing (not chopping or dicing) a large onion. Sweet Vidalia is best, but any onion will do. Place it in the bottom of the crock. Everything else gets stacked on top of the onion.

Put 1/4 cup A-1 sauce, 1/4 cup red wine and 1/2 cup water in a measuring cup. Whisk it up until the A-1 is disolved. If you know what HP Sauce is and have it on hand, use it instead of A-1. And use real wine, not cooking wine. Cooking wine has too much salt added.

Either marinade or inject the above goop into the roast. If marinade, the longer the better, up to overnight. Put the roast on top of the onions.

Cover the roast with other vegetables you want, carrots, potatos, green beans, whatever.

Cover and cook on "High" two hours. Reduce to "Low" until done, probably another four or so hours, depending on roast size.

Ms_Dragon
December 26, 2012, 05:28 PM
What my father taught me to do with gamey old buck hares was to soak it over night in a sink full of water with a cup of white vinegar mixed into it.

Rinse it off and pat it dry before cooking.

a-sheepdog
December 26, 2012, 06:33 PM
Slice up the roast into chunks of about 1-1/2" squares. Throw it in the crock pot with about 1/2 cup of cooking wine, a packet of Lipton Onion Soup, a couple of cans of Golden Mushroom Soup and a can of Cream Of Mushroom Soup along with salt and pepper. Cook on low all day long, if you desire more gravy, use more soup. Goes great with mashed potatoes. It also works on wild hog, cook low and slow.

1911 guy
December 26, 2012, 06:37 PM
"Gamey" taste is a funny thing, there seems to be no concensus on what causes it. My personal opinion is that it's caused by several things. Lack of a quick kill floods the animal with adrenalyn. Not caring for the meat properly from the outset causes bacteria to form and multiply, causing a change in taste in the meat. An older animal tastes different than a younger animal, especially youung does compared to old bucks. I'm also of the opinion that using a saw to process the deer allows for bones being cut and marrow getting on the meat, contributing to "gamey" taste.

Once it's present, though, the question becomes how to eliminate it. Anything slightly acidic, like the vineagar mixture mentioned above, will help. The trick is to not over-do it and wind up with meat that tastes just as bad "fixed" as it did "gamey". My prefered method is to use a marinade or injection that contains slightly acidic ingredients, like the A-1 and wine. Your cooking style may lend itself to other methods, though.

JeffDilla
December 26, 2012, 07:18 PM
This will be the first roast I'll have cooked from this particular buck. None of the other meat has been gamey at all and has been fantastic.

I can say it was a very quick kill, deer dropped in its tracks. But you're right, I have heard that an animal that doesn't die quickly can have a different (read: worse) taste.

I'm going to try the A1 and wine recipe tonight and add a few things to get creative.

Thanks for all the replies.

JeffDilla
December 26, 2012, 07:22 PM
I've read that slicing apples and cooking them with the roast helps as well. Anyone tried this?

1911 guy
December 26, 2012, 07:32 PM
I'm not sure that apples will help with eliminating gaminess, but there are a few meats that cook well with certain fruits. For apples, pork and venison come immediately to mind. In other words, as long as you don't "clutter" the taste too much, you aught to be good to go using apples.

JeffDilla
December 26, 2012, 07:47 PM
The roast is now sitting in the A1, merlot, and water marinade for the night. Thanks for the tips, 1911 guy.

1911 guy
December 26, 2012, 08:02 PM
Merlot is a good choice. Lots of fruit and earthy flavors that aren't found in straight up red wine.

If you've got it in overnight, I'd pop it in the crock early in the morning and cook on low all day. Skip the high setting for the first hour or two. Do it like I do ribs in the smoker. In by breakfast, falling apart by dinner. The ribs are usually good, too.:)

Rembrandt
December 26, 2012, 08:08 PM
One packet Lipton onion soup mix, deer roast, cover with water.......cook low heat for about 8 hours. Remove meat when done, use water/soup mix to make a brown gravy.

wyohome
December 26, 2012, 10:55 PM
I would cut the roast into serving sized chunks, brown in bacon fat and follow some of the other guy's suggestions.

Patocazador
December 26, 2012, 11:15 PM
"Gamey" taste is a funny thing, there seems to be no concensus on what causes it. My personal opinion is that it's caused by several things. Lack of a quick kill floods the animal with adrenalyn. Not caring for the meat properly from the outset causes bacteria to form and multiply, causing a change in taste in the meat. An older animal tastes different than a younger animal, especially youung does compared to old bucks. I'm also of the opinion that using a saw to process the deer allows for bones being cut and marrow getting on the meat, contributing to "gamey" taste.

Once it's present, though, the question becomes how to eliminate it. Anything slightly acidic, like the vineagar mixture mentioned above, will help. The trick is to not over-do it and wind up with meat that tastes just as bad "fixed" as it did "gamey". My prefered method is to use a marinade or injection that contains slightly acidic ingredients, like the A-1 and wine. Your cooking style may lend itself to other methods, though.
Deer fat tastes terrible and hardens at a high temperature making the meat taste as if it has soap hunks in it. ALWAYS remove all fat when cleaning your deer.

IMO, gamey taste is due to semi-spoilage from not dressing and skinning the deer soon enough to cool it down and/or to getting gut contents on the meat while cleaning.

1911 guy
December 27, 2012, 03:27 AM
Agreed, but the fat doesn't taste "gamey". It tastes absolutely bitter and rancid. But yes, absolutely trim ALL fat from venison before cooking and preferably when you're butchering. I guesss I assume that because anybody who's cooked venison with the fat still on it usually doesn't make that mistake twice.

Ms_Dragon
December 27, 2012, 03:35 AM
I wonder if venison fat, once it's been rendered down, makes good soap?

Lloyd Smale
December 27, 2012, 07:48 AM
thats my favorite but i throw in a chopped up onion and a few carrots. Cream of mush soup is another good one. trim your meat well and i doubt it will have any gammy taste. that said i dont want my venison roast to taste like a bland beef roast. I like the taste of venison for what it is.

inclinebench
December 27, 2012, 10:21 AM
I know it is a little late for this particular roast, but I tried making corned venison this year, and it is amazing. I probably will not be eating corned beef again. A fellow by the name of Hank Shaw has a website honest-food.net that has the corning recipe as well as a bunch of other great ones.

JeffDilla
December 27, 2012, 10:55 AM
inclinebench, this website is amazing! Thanks for the link. I have another venison roast in the freezer that I think I'll try corning.

Arkansas Paul
December 27, 2012, 10:57 AM
I've read that slicing apples and cooking them with the roast helps as well. Anyone tried this?


:barf:

Put the apples in the desert, that's where they go. :)
Just kidding, to each his own. I despise fruit or even the slightest hint of sweetness with any meat. I'm so weird like that. I even hate honey glazed ham or ham with pineapple on top. Smoke that bad boy and call it good.

For my crockpot venison, I cut into manageable size pieces and brown on the stovetop first. Then cover with beef stock and let cook on low all night in the crockpot along with plenty of onion and garlic. It should be falling apart at this point. About an hour or two before time to serve, I'll throw in some cream of mushroom and cream of celery. Pour some of that over some mashed taters and man, you talk about good.

JeffDilla
December 27, 2012, 11:10 AM
I decided not to put the apples in anyway, I didn't think they'd pair well with the wine and A1 :scrutiny:

I did put plenty of sweet onion slices in though, and a liberal amount of worcestershire. I made enough of the mixture to mostly cover the roast. Things are starting to smell great, it's been in for about 2 hours now.

Arkansas Paul
December 27, 2012, 11:38 AM
Let's see, if I leave now, I can be at your house in about 28 hours......:)

MCgunner
December 27, 2012, 02:36 PM
Process it properly and it won't be gamey. I love the crock pot for venison roasts, gets it to fall right apart. Don't even need a knife to eat it. :D I just spice it with salt, pepper, and garlic powder or sometimes I'll pour a bag of McCormick's pot roast seasoning over it. Cut up some onion, potatoes, and add some baby carrots for veggies. Excellent.

inclinebench
December 27, 2012, 03:34 PM
Hey Jeff, you are welcome. He also has links to like minded websites with great stories and recipes. I cannot rave enough about the corned venison.

JeffDilla
December 27, 2012, 08:25 PM
Update: The roast came out great. Excellent flavor and not a hint of gaminess. I made a gravy by adding a bit of butter to some of the broth in a sauce pan, then added a water/flour slurry, some thyme, and worcestershire sauce. It went great with the meat, potato, and carrots. My girlfriend made a loaf of beer bread to go with it as well.

All in all a fantastic meal on a snowy day!

Ms_Dragon
December 27, 2012, 09:40 PM
That's great Jeff and I'm jealous! It sounds delicious.

dogrunner
December 27, 2012, 10:54 PM
Wife did a small roast last week that turned out very similar to a fine cut of very lean beef.

Crock pot for about five hrs, marinated in that pot with about a quarter cover of unsweetened apple juice with a small amount of soy sauce thrown in for good measure. Lightly covered with brown sugar...........served it with homemade mashed potatos and green beans. Did the gravy thing with the pot contents but it was a bit on the sweet side.........still an outstanding and tender cut of meat.


I'll toss this out to any that've had a tough chunk of meat as well. Had a friend a few years back that killed a bison that his dad butchered for him.....old man said the thing was the toughest piece of game he'd ever delt with. I took about a 8 lb roast that the fellas said was inedible, soaked it overnight in a straight pepsi cola marinade. Smoked it the next day for about six hours and had the pleasure of one fine and tender chunk of beef............apple juice works nearly as well too.

Sav .250
December 28, 2012, 09:28 AM
So here's the deal. I'm a teacher and on vacation. Looks like we're in for over a foot of snow tomorrow, so it'll be a good day to hang around the house and get some stuff done. I'd like to use one of the roasts I have to make a crock pot meal. I've checked the recipe sticky but didn't see anything that jumped out at me.

What slow cooker recipes have you used for deer roasts? Anything to help with the gaminess? I don't mind it but my girlfriend isn't fond of it.

Thanks folks.
"Gaminess" If you think it has some sort of different taste, you are correct. Makes me wonder why folks kill something, then don`t like the taste of.

Cook your game-e roast on the lowest setting on your crock pot. Add your spuds,onions,carrots, what ever and leave it simmer all day. You`ll know when it`s done. Comes out cooked, tender and very tasty. Course I like venison so I can say that.
Others who don`t really like the taste might bury it with all sorts of stuff to tone down the taste. Soak it in milk.Soak it in salt water. other remedies I`m sure.
When done properly...........means different things to different folks, it`s really a great meal.

red rick
December 28, 2012, 09:02 PM
I cook mine just like I would cook beef. I don't soak it, I just trim all the silver skin off and rinse it good. It never tastes wild to me. Making a stew Sunday.

Lloyd Smale
December 29, 2012, 06:52 AM
Gaminess" If you think it has some sort of different taste, you are correct. Makes me wonder why folks kill something, then don`t like the taste of.

Cook your game-e roast on the lowest setting on your crock pot. Add your spuds,onions,carrots, what ever and leave it simmer all day. You`ll know when it`s done. Comes out cooked, tender and very tasty. Course I like venison so I can say that.
Others who don`t really like the taste might bury it with all sorts of stuff to tone down the taste. Soak it in milk.Soak it in salt water. other remedies I`m sure.
When done properly...........means different things to different folks, it`s really a great meal.

got to agree. I dont cook a venison roast or steak wanting it to taste like beef. I dont cook a pheasant or grouse wanting it to taste like chicken. I like the taste of venison and sure dont want to cook it enough stuff to hide the taste.

35 Whelen
December 29, 2012, 11:18 AM
"Gamey" taste is a funny thing, there seems to be no concensus on what causes it. My personal opinion is that it's caused by several things. Lack of a quick kill floods the animal with adrenalyn. Not caring for the meat properly from the outset causes bacteria to form and multiply, causing a change in taste in the meat. An older animal tastes different than a younger animal, especially youung does compared to old bucks. I'm also of the opinion that using a saw to process the deer allows for bones being cut and marrow getting on the meat, contributing to "gamey" taste.

Once it's present, though, the question becomes how to eliminate it. Anything slightly acidic, like the vineagar mixture mentioned above, will help. The trick is to not over-do it and wind up with meat that tastes just as bad "fixed" as it did "gamey". My prefered method is to use a marinade or injection that contains slightly acidic ingredients, like the A-1 and wine. Your cooking style may lend itself to other methods, though.
Gamey? The easiest way to eliminate "gamey" taste when eating venison is to remember that venison is not supposed to taste like beef, just like mutton doesn't taste like pork and pork doesn't taste like chicken, salmon doesn't taste like catfish, catfish doesn't taste like trout, etc. So, don't bite into a piece of backstrap thinking it's supposed to taste like ribeye. I personally love the taste of venison and hate when the wife has to buy ground beef.

Also, take care of the meat. Don't gut shoot a deer then wonder why the meat taste rancid. Don't gut it, then drag it through leaves and mud and wonder why the meat is putrid. If it's hot, get it some place cool. If it's cool, as in 50's or lower, let the deer hang in the shade for several days. If I happen to kill a deer when I know temps won't be out of the 50's, I'll let it hang in my shop for a week if at all possible. Aging meat in this way does wonders for the quality of the meat.

Somewhere on the 'net, I read an excellent article on cooking meat and the importance of cooking at temps never exceeding 250F.

35W

ETA- Sorry Loyd, had already posted this when I saw your similar post.

03Shadowbob
December 29, 2012, 04:39 PM
I put a de-boned ham from a young doe I killed in October in the crockpot this morning. Put it on a layer of Vidalia onion slices, st and pepper, golden mushroom soup mixed with cream of mushroom, carrots and taters. At 6:30 it will be down after 10 hours in the pot. It's gonna be damn good!

45crittergitter
December 29, 2012, 10:50 PM
I don't use a recipe. To reduce gaminess, trim out all the membranes and connective tissue, essentially dissecting your cuts of meat. I just throw the cut in the pot, whittle up some carrots, potatoes, onions and peppers in it, add a bit of most every spice in the cabinet and some mushrooms, maybe a bullion cube and a package of onion/mushroom soup mix, cover with water, turn on low and let it go 8+ hours.

1911 guy
December 30, 2012, 12:17 AM
Ya'll are misenterpreting gamey taste with tasting like venison. Venison cared for properly tastes like venison. However, deer meat filled with adrenalyn, gotten too warm, or just wasn't generally cared for well enough. The meat might not be spoiled, but the taste has been affected. I'm not going to toss out a pile of meat that pound for pound cost me more than Kobe beef just because it was a warmish day and a long drag out of the woods. So I sometimes choose to doctor it a little.

So yes, venison does taste like venison, not beef or chicken. But I'm also not going to waste meat because it didn't come out perfect every time.

Arkansas Paul
December 30, 2012, 04:05 PM
I'm not going to toss out a pile of meat that pound for pound cost me more than Kobe beef just because it was a warmish day and a long drag out of the woods. So I sometimes choose to doctor it a little.

I understand what you're saying 1911 guy. Those cuts you're talking about make for good sausage. There's a local butcher here that does jalepeno cheddar summer sausage for $7 per 2 lb stick. Mmmmm it's good. If you suspect a strong gamey flavor, all of the seasonings it takes for sausage would mask the gaminess I imagine.

red rick
December 30, 2012, 07:06 PM
My cockpot venison stew sure is smelling good right now. A friend of mine called me this afternoon to see if I wanted to ride with him to Basspro. He said I smelled like onions when I got in his truck. I told him that I was cooking venison stew.

Ms_Dragon
December 30, 2012, 11:17 PM
Kangaroo tastes very similar to venison.

Both being very low in fat, high in protein and iron.

I rather eat either kangaroo or venison that feral pig any day of the week.

glockgod
December 31, 2012, 08:49 AM
After fixing a wonderful meal like that I hope you got some dessert later!

Leadbutt
December 31, 2012, 12:18 PM
1911, got to agree on the favor having some thing to do with adrenaline, where I do the most hunting its with buckshot only and pushed by dogs, warm weather and little hang time for the meat, one thing I have found that helps with improving the favor of the meat is a marinade like you posted.

But the easiest I have found is to take the roast or what ever and soak it over night in 2 to 4 litters of the CHEAPEST Coke or Pepsi you can find after trimming all the fat and silver skin off, there is something about the coke make up that helps break down and tenderise the meat to boot

moconfed
January 2, 2013, 06:51 PM
From my great great grandmother:
To soak the gamey out of wild meat-
Place the meat in a bowl, cover with water, sprinkle with salt, baking soda, and give it a glug of vinegar. Soak overnight, rinse well the next day and cook 'er up.
I can personally vouch that this works!

bad_aim_billy
January 2, 2013, 09:46 PM
Never bought into the "adrenaline" or "bad processing" theories about why venison tastes "gamey". I instantly dropped a forkhorn one year that tasted terrible. On the flipside, I've seen old deer that have run a ways after being hit, and then processed in less-than-ideal circumstances, and tasted great.

Some deer just taste bad.

And lots of worcester sauce is my favorite for a good vension roast...

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