Winchester 1892 stock question


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Quoheleth
December 26, 2012, 11:44 PM
For the world's coolest Christmas present giver award, I want to nominate my brother-in-law. Tonight he gave me a 500,000 SN-range 1892 in .32 WCF. SN dates the gun to 1910.

The interesting thing is that the gun is a fire salvage. His father was given it from a client whose house burned down 25+ years ago. Knowing I like guns and woodwork, my BIL arranged for me to get it as a Christmas gift.

I need to post some photos, but the action is frozen. The hammer moves freely; the loading gate moves; the lever and trigger are seized. I have no idea about barrel obstructions or if the magazine tube is seized. Surprisingly, the metal is in good shape for surviving a fire - while it lost all coloring/bluing, it isn't warped at all.

The wood all burned in the fire. I'm wanting to make a set of stocks for the gun. Anyone know of a schematic for Winchester stocks? Mine is a straight-grip stock and the forend has the metal front metal "cap" like the deluxe models had.

I know I could buy a replacement set, but I like the idea of making it myself - besides, that was the reason my BIL gave it to me. I know it would have been walnut - I have some in the woodshop. I just need a schematic.

Thanks so much,
Q

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rcmodel
December 27, 2012, 12:16 AM
No idea of a drawing for the stock & forearm.
I didn't look too hard because:

You said:
The hammer moves freely. the metal is in good shape for surviving a fire - while it lost all coloring/bluing. The wood all burned in the fire

That right there means the receiver, bolt, locking blocks, lever, lifter, and all the springs are annealed.


And that means your brother-in-law probably meant well.

But he gave you a junk rifle that will never be safe to re-stock, re-finish, or ever fire again.
Unless you want to send it off to someone like Doug Turnbull and let them try to restore the heat treating.
But that will cost you several times more then the fire salvage gun parts are worth.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but it is as it looks right now.
And that is Toast!

Even if you could somehow make it look like new again?
And only ever shoot low power reduced loads in it so it doesn't just blow up?

Who will be around 50-75 years from now to tell the next guy that owns it that it's a fire damaged ticking time bomb waiting to blow his face off with normal power ammunition??

rc

splithoof
December 27, 2012, 01:07 AM
Make a wall-hanger out of it. Weld the action closed, hand carve some wood, stain it, and call it good.

Quoheleth
December 27, 2012, 07:59 AM
I should have known better than to write at 11pm. I hear you, rc - I'm not intending to shoot this gun - I want it as a wall-hanger, but I wanted to try to make a set of stocks anyway.

If it doesn't work out, it doesn't work out but I thought it would be a fun project.

Again: not wanting to make it shoot, just clean it up and put wood on it that I made.

Q

rcmodel
December 27, 2012, 10:48 AM
Well heres a repro stock with measurements shown.

Maybe you can print photos of it and scale it up for a plan??

http://www.boydsgunstocks.com/WIN-92-PRE-64-94-STK-W-UF-p/300-100.htm

rc

greyling22
December 27, 2012, 07:17 PM
maybe something here?

http://shop.macongunstocks.com/Winchester-Model-1892-Winchester-Model-1894-94-Pre-64_c60.htm

Jim K
December 27, 2012, 07:40 PM
There are no "schematics" for those stocks, and I doubt anything made without knowing exactly what it should look like will satisfy. I would try www.gunpartscorp.com; they have both foreend and butt stocks at a reasonable price and are good quallity wood; they will have to be fitted. Make sure to get the foreend for the small magazine tube.

I think fitting and finishing the wood will be enough to be able to say "I did it"; believe me, it is not just a matter of sticking the part on.

I am not sure I agree with the above good folks, though I would have to see the gun. If the springs are not gone, the receiver may well be in good enough shape for refinishing and moderate shooting. Old dry wood will sometimes burn without becoming very hot.

Jim

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