Advertise for guns in local paper?


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SleazyRider
December 31, 2012, 10:13 AM
As I watched the news last night, I was sickened by footage of a gun "buy back" program showing the guns people turned in, now slated for destruction. We're talking 1911s, single-action Colts, lever rifles, et cetera. They're turning these things in for 100 bucks each, or in some cases, a bag of groceries!

So it got me to thinking---would it be advisable to place an ad in my local paper offering to purchase firearms? Here's what I had in mind:
"Lawful buyer of firearms wishes to purchase legally owned rifles, shotguns, and handguns in any condition. New York State only, cash paid." (Or similar verbiage.)

Good/bad idea? Safe? Would it invite an interview with my local PD? I'd appreciate your thoughts on this. I'm not a rich man, nor am I a "motivated buyer" to the extent that I'd pay top dollar, but I certainly wouldn't pass up a bargain if I could find one, especially if it's a gun that's been just kicking around the house collecting dust.

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NavyLCDR
December 31, 2012, 10:17 AM
And what would you do with these guns once you purchased them? If you intend to sell them it would be pretty hard to prove to the ATF that you were not engaged in the business of dealing in firearms if you sold them after advertising your desire to purchase them in the paper.

People who take their guns to the gun buybacks do not want ANYONE owning the guns anyway. They want them confiscated by the government and destroyed. You might have a couple of people whose greed would override their anti-gun desires that might take you up on the offer in the hopes of making an extra $100, but I think that would be rare.

SleazyRider
December 31, 2012, 10:20 AM
Good point. Nope, I'd not sell them. I'd just like to fatten up my modest collection with a few more specimens. No more than a few.

Arkansas Paul
December 31, 2012, 10:47 AM
I know here in Arkansas, you'd be fine, but then again we're free.........for now.
I have no clue about how NY would view it.

matrem
December 31, 2012, 11:06 AM
There have been ads similar to that in my local paper for years. As of Friday Dec 28th, there is one still running.
But, as stated, in NY that may be a completely different "animal".

jim243
December 31, 2012, 11:12 AM
While you are buying for your private collection a few problems my come up.

1. Without runing a NICS check you have no way of knowing for sure if the person is able to sell you that firearm or if they are a criminal with a record.

2. No way of knowing if that firearm has been stolen and now you become a fence for stolen property.

3. You would give the appearance of doing business in the purchase and sale of firearms and would need a FFL.

4. You would come under the suspicion of doing straw pruchases of firearms and serve 10 years as a felon.

I'm sure the local Sherrif would stop by to make sure all your paperwork is in order for all of your other guns.

Other than that, I see no problem. (LOL)
Jim

JohnBT
December 31, 2012, 11:52 AM
I don't see any of those things happening if all a guy does is advertise and buy a bunch of guns for his collection (& civil war stuff, coins, power tools, etc.) People have been doing it here for decades.

The law - here anyway - doesn't require the buyer be able to prove the seller is an angel. Heck, I could buy a used gun from a dealer, pass the check, and years later find out the gun was stolen or something and be out the purchase price when it's returned to the owner. That's just how it goes.

John

BobTheTomato
December 31, 2012, 11:56 AM
I see ads quite often that says cash paid for guns.

emailforforum84
December 31, 2012, 11:57 AM
I do know that here in FL it is against the law to attempt to purchase a firearm from an individual who is turning it over to a police or government run "buy back"

So while you are not specifically saying thats what you are doing (although you just did on this forum) I would be concerned with the possibility of it being construed as that.

BobTheTomato
December 31, 2012, 11:58 AM
I guess I should add while they show a table with Ak-47s, Ar-15s and RPGs the vast majority of what is turned in is junk. Other than that it is people who do not want any paper trail on the firearm. Every once in a while you get someone trying to turn in an antique firearm.

SleazyRider
December 31, 2012, 12:28 PM
While you are buying for your private collection a few problems my come up.

1. Without runing a NICS check you have no way of knowing for sure if the person is able to sell you that firearm or if they are a criminal with a record.

2. No way of knowing if that firearm has been stolen and now you become a fence for stolen property.

3. You would give the appearance of doing business in the purchase and sale of firearms and would need a FFL.

4. You would come under the suspicion of doing straw pruchases of firearms and serve 10 years as a felon.

I'm sure the local Sherrif would stop by to make sure all your paperwork is in order for all of your other guns.

Other than that, I see no problem. (LOL)
Jim
All good points, and I thank you.

1. New York State permits FTF transactions between residents on long guns, which does not require a NICS check. Pistol transfers between residents can be done with the appropriate paperwork filed at the county level.

2. I can, and certainly would, have a LEO buddy run the numbers through NCIC's stolen firearms registry.

3. I'd not be offering them for sale, and for what it's worth (not much in NYS), I do have a Type 3 FFL.

4. Hopefully they'd try me first! I can't afford 10 years!

The sheriff would find that all my firearms are lawfully owned and registered, but I'd not welcome the intrusion. If the newspapers got hold of it, I'm sure my SKS would become a military-style assault rifle with a grenade launcher and they'd want to know what legitimate sporting purposes the bayonet on my Mosin Nagant serves. Then there's the Ruger 10/22, a semi-automatic weapon of similar caliber to the one used in Newtown. My modest collection would become an arsenal. And the list goes on.

Maybe advertising for firearms isn't such a good idea.

NavyLCDR
December 31, 2012, 03:37 PM
While you are buying for your private collection a few problems my come up.

1. Without runing a NICS check you have no way of knowing for sure if the person is able to sell you that firearm or if they are a criminal with a record.

2. No way of knowing if that firearm has been stolen and now you become a fence for stolen property.

3. You would give the appearance of doing business in the purchase and sale of firearms and would need a FFL.

4. You would come under the suspicion of doing straw pruchases of firearms and serve 10 years as a felon.

I'm sure the local Sherrif would stop by to make sure all your paperwork is in order for all of your other guns.

Other than that, I see no problem. (LOL)
Jim

1. There is no law prohibiting criminals from selling firearms. That is one way for felons to dispose of their firearms when they become felons, in fact. Also, NICS checks cannot be run on sellers, only on buyers. Not even licensed dealers can run NICS checks on sellers.

2. When you buy a used firearm from a dealer, you have no assurance it is not stolen either. Few gun shops check if firearms being sold to them or traded in are stolen or not, nor have a requirement to do so. In some states, pawn shops must report certain items taken in to LE to check if they are stolen or not.

3. Yes, a suspicious APPEARANCE might be presented.

4. Yeah, right. If the buyer KEEPS the firearms and they are not transferred to anyone else, exactly how can there be any evidence of straw purchasing. AND, in addition, straw purchasing only applies to firearms purchased from licensed dealers and completing a form 4473. Straw purchasing does not apply to private purchases and sales.

You clearly lack an understanding of how firearms transactions actually work.

I certainly agree that it would probably be a bad idea to post an ad saying, "Sell your guns to me rather than the police or government", but at least present valid reasons why instead of promoting erroneous information.

3twelves
December 31, 2012, 03:41 PM
Nice propaganda.....


http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1229492!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_635/los-angeles-gun-buyback.jpg

SleazyRider
December 31, 2012, 03:51 PM
... Few gun shops check if firearms being sold to them or traded in are stolen or not, nor have a requirement to do so. ...

A very interesting point you make, sir, and one that makes me wonder why the NCIC's Stolen Firearms Registry isn't public information that is readily available online. As I understand it, the data is available only to LE agencies.

Stumpknocker
December 31, 2012, 03:52 PM
I do know that here in FL it is against the law to attempt to purchase a firearm from an individual who is turning it over to a police or government run "buy back"

So while you are not specifically saying thats what you are doing (although you just did on this forum) I would be concerned with the possibility of it being construed as that.

I'd be interested in seeing a link or some reference for such a law in Florida. At what point is a gun determined to be headed to a buyback so that no one else may legally buy it?


Sent from my XT557 using Tapatalk 2

medalguy
December 31, 2012, 11:20 PM
You could always run an ad stating "Legal collector buying guns for my own collection that anyone no longer wants in their home and desires to sell for cash."

Tim the student
December 31, 2012, 11:42 PM
^ Winner, IMO.

Ehtereon11B
January 1, 2013, 12:05 AM
I don't think EVERYONE who brings their firearms in to gun buyback programs doesn't want anyone else to have them. Think about. How many times a week does someone go in the legal section of THR asking how do they sell firearm X? There are legalities and loopholes with FFLs, interstate, intrastate, private sales etc. Maybe some of these people turning in firearms do not know that they can legally, somehow sell a firearm to someone that actually wants it. Granted some of them getting rid of them don't want the thing and no one else to have it. But there has to be a chunk of them that doesn't know what they can do legally. These are probably the same people who think guns are "registered" at the Federal level and turning it in to the police is the only way to wipe their firearm slate.

breakingcontact
January 1, 2013, 01:18 AM
I'm sure the local Sherrif would stop by to make sure all your paperwork is in order for all of your other guns.

What paperwork? Who's showing up? The Stasi?

deere140
January 1, 2013, 01:39 AM
Most of my local papers have not allowed firearms related ads in years.

Twiki357
January 1, 2013, 02:02 AM
breakingcontact: "What paperwork? Who's showing up? The Stasi?"

The OP is in New York. Nuff said.

Ignition Override
January 1, 2013, 02:19 AM
How about ammo?

Back around early '09 (barely post-election) on Craigslist, some guy in Memphis offered to buy ammo at a low cost, in order to "safely dispose of it"

His last comment was: "Swords into plowshares". Pretty slick, wasn't it?

Plan2Live
January 1, 2013, 10:09 AM
Or you could hang out near the location and hit folks up as they approached the "official" buy back. That way you would be shopping for the best and not end up with a bunch of beaters.

Atbat82
January 1, 2013, 10:37 AM
Or you could hang out near the location and hit folks up as they approached the "official" buy back. That way you would be shopping for the best and not end up with a bunch of beaters.

I thought about doing this this past weekend, but I questioned if it was a) legal and b) I figured it wouldn't be long before someone complained and I got hassled by the police.


Sent from my iPhone

Lex Luthier
January 1, 2013, 11:04 AM
Newspaper? It is 2012, er 13, and the world is moving faster than ink can dry. The FIRST source for most people looking for ANYTHING is web-based. Whether you like it or not, print media news is dying. The only exception I believe in are older out of print books.

The ROI expectations for a newspaper ad are limited at best. Maybe that is what you want. Most older people still read newspapers and that might be your target market.

michaelbsc
January 1, 2013, 12:55 PM
A very interesting point you make, sir, and one that makes me wonder why the NCIC's Stolen Firearms Registry isn't public information that is readily available online. As I understand it, the data is available only to LE agencies.


Not sure about other places, but my experience is that Pawn Shops do a booming gun business. And where I live they're obliged to check for stolen everything, not just guns.

Regular gun shops don't seem to have that restriction.

SleazyRider
January 1, 2013, 07:24 PM
Or you could hang out near the location and hit folks up as they approached the "official" buy back. That way you would be shopping for the best and not end up with a bunch of beaters.
No way I'd do that. That's sure to get me an audience with the police!

SleazyRider
January 1, 2013, 07:54 PM
breakingcontact: "What paperwork? Who's showing up? The Stasi?"

The OP is in New York. Nuff said.
Very helpful. Thank you.

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