Which Redding die set for 260 Rem?


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Onewolf
January 3, 2013, 10:28 AM
I am a (soon to be) handloading newbie and I plan to reload Rem 260 for long range field/match shooting. My Redding T-7 press was delivered yesterday. Which (Redding)die set would be recommended to start with? Just a basic die set or should I start with one the higher end match/competition/bushing die sets?

Series A basic dies? Full Length Die Set 80531 or Deluxe Die Set 84531?

Type S MATCH Bushing Full Die Set 36531

Type S MATCH Bushing Neck Die Set 78531

Competition Bushing Neck Die Set 58531

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Doug

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cfullgraf
January 3, 2013, 11:07 AM
You will need at least a full length sizer die and a seater die. Generally, these are called two die full length sizer die sets or something to that effect.

For most, the regular set will serve you well.

The higher priced sets have features for folks that do more precision shooting. That does not mean any could not use them, but they do cost more for small increased in benefits and a small added difficulty in reloading.

While I like Redding dies and prefer to buy them, any of the manufacturers dies will work as well, many times at lower cost.

Virtually all presses manufactured today use a 7/8"-14 threads per inch dies. Virtually all dies made today are 7/8"-14. So, they can be interchanged between presses.

moonzapa
January 3, 2013, 11:09 AM
If I were you, I would start out with Redding's Deluxe Die Set in 260 Rem. However, I would opt to use Redding's "Competition Bullet Seating Die". I'm getting an honest .5" groups all day with my 280 Rem.

If I can get this much performance from my ultra-light 280 hunting rifle, you should be able to top this easily with a precision match rifle in 260. The 260 is a very slippery caliber (BC) and you should be able to find Berger, and other, match bullets that will get the job done for you.

Keep in mind that I weigh and sort my brass, and I also measure my bullets (length to ogive distance); not all bullets are created equal.

Hope this helps out.:o

capreppy
January 3, 2013, 03:19 PM
I am about to start reloading for 260 Rem for a rifle that is in the process of being built. I went through the same decision just a few weeks ago.

What I have decided on is the following:
- Redding FL Sizing die with the Carbide Sizer (not necessary, but I've used one in my 223 and I like it)
- Lee Collett Neck Sizing Die (I'm not going to be good enough to see the difference in accuracy between the Lee and a Type S Neck Sizer or the Competition Neck Sizer)
- Redding Competition Seating Die (I have one in 223 and again, I like it a lot)


edit: my plan is to FL size initially and neck size 3 times and then anneal and then FL size again.

ArchAngelCD
January 3, 2013, 03:23 PM
I am about to start reloading for 260 Rem for a rifle that is in the process of being built. I went through the same decision just a few weeks ago.

What I have decided on is the following:
- Redding FL Sizing die with the Carbide Sizer (not necessary, but I've used one in my 223 and I like it)
- Lee Collett Neck Sizing Die (I'm not going to be good enough to see the difference in accuracy between the Lee and a Type S Neck Sizer or the Competition Neck Sizer)
- Redding Competition Seating Die (I have one in 223 and again, I like it a lot)


edit: my plan is to FL size initially and neck size 3 times and then anneal and then FL size again.
Those sound like good choices although I have never loaded long range competition ammo.

capreppy
January 3, 2013, 03:54 PM
Neither have I, but when my shooting skills will allow me to SEE the difference between the Lee Collett Neck Sizing Die and one of the two other Redding Bushing Neck Dies, then I will upgrade. That will be a couple of years I think and the difference in price will pay for some bullets to improve my skills to the point where it will be justified.

Walkalong
January 3, 2013, 05:26 PM
Type S MATCH Bushing Full Die Set 36531

lightman
January 3, 2013, 06:42 PM
I use the deluxe die set for my factory rifles.I don't recommend bushing dies for beginners,or for those that don't turn case necks.No insult meant,everyone was a beginner at some time,and I do like and use bushing dies.I just don't think you get any benefit without turning the case neck. Lightman

Onewolf
January 3, 2013, 07:26 PM
Thanks for all the great information and quick responses.

Since I am not sure which bullets my gun (Savage Long Range Precision) "likes" I have ordered 100 packs of a variety of the "likely suspects".

So far I have shot around 300 rounds of Corbon factory match grade ammo which has Lapua brass and Lapua Scenar 139gr bullets and they seem to do ok (I'm pretty sure that my lack of experience/skill is the limiting factor currently anyway). My last range day I shot both 5 shot groups under 3" at 300 meters so I am making some progress.

I have ordered 100 packs of Berger VLD 140s, VLD 130s, Berger Hybrid 140s, Sierra Matchking 140s, and MatchKing 142s, Lapua Scenar 139s, Lapua Boattail 144s, Hornady A-MAX 140s, Nosler Custom Competition 140s, and Barnes MatchBurner 140s. :eek:

Hopefully one of these bullets will be the 'standout' choice.

capreppy
January 3, 2013, 07:29 PM
Really good choices. I picked up 1k Nosler 140gr CC's and that'll be my first thousand through the barrel, but will likely move to the Hornady 140gr HPBT Match after that. A lot of folks have excellent success with the Nosler and the Hornady and they are both reasonably priced.

ArchAngelCD
January 3, 2013, 08:35 PM
I have ordered 100 packs of Berger VLD 140s, VLD 130s, Berger Hybrid 140s, Sierra Matchking 140s, and MatchKing 142s, Lapua Scenar 139s, Lapua Boattail 144s, Hornady A-MAX 140s, Nosler Custom Competition 140s, and Barnes MatchBurner 140s. :eek:
OH BOY, you got it bad! Welcome to this addiction called reloading!

Enjoy and welcome to the forum...

Clark
January 3, 2013, 11:16 PM
Redding stopped offering honed out necks in their FL dies.

I would call up Forster and get a 260Rem FL die body with the neck honed out to .288" for RP260 brass. Bigger for 7mm-08 brass, and even bigger for 308 brass that is barely neck turned. My Forster FL 260 die is still a stock .284" and I don't use it, because I have started making my own 260 neck&shoulder dies to get Lapua small primer 308 brass down to 260 so I can go to higher pressure. I have to turn necks. I use a Lee 260 collet neck die for the final neck sizing.

I cheaped out and did not order a custom reamer for the 260.
I am using a plane Jane SAAMI 260 reamer $100 Manson from Brownells, that cuts a big .298" neck, like my Douglas factory .260 neck. I would avoid bushing dies with factory chambers.

I bought dies for 26 different rifle cartridges before I started working on 260, so I already had some opinions about Redding dies before I got to the .260.
Some rifle cartridges, like the .223, I bought a lot of different dies so I could compare them. Redding FL "S" die looked the best, cost the most, and was the worst for concentricity and case growth. Lee Collet neck dies, cost the least, looked the worst, and were the best for concentricity and case growth.

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