Will I be happy with Lee dies?


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Huskerguy
January 5, 2013, 04:53 PM
I have mostly Hornady and some RCBS although I do use Lee FCD and a neck die for 223. I am getting into 45 ACP and don't plan on this being a caliber I shot thousands of rounds. I do have a single stage and LNL Progressive.

I am an accuracy/consistency kind of person. Your thoughts?

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joustin
January 5, 2013, 05:03 PM
I have loaded several thousand 45ACP on my Lee dies with no issue.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

Constrictor
January 5, 2013, 05:06 PM
Lee dies are decent but I've been much happier having moved on from lee.

soloban
January 5, 2013, 05:09 PM
I like the Lee Carbide 4 Die sets for pistol but don't much care for Lee Rifle Dies. I much prefer Redding and RCBS in that order. I've slowly replaced most of my Lee Rifle dies with Redding dies whenever I happen to snag a deal on eBay on lightly used Redding or RCBS dies.

ArchAngelCD
January 5, 2013, 05:10 PM
All of my handgun dies are Lee and I'm very happy with the. They make accurate ammo for me and that's the whole idea...

PapaG
January 5, 2013, 05:14 PM
I much prefer Dillon dies for powder charging ( smoother) than lee's, also, for taper crimping, I like just about anyone else's.

kerreckt
January 5, 2013, 05:14 PM
Lee dies work for me. Never had any problems with Lee products. I have dies from every major manufacturer and they are as good as any, IMHO.

ssyoumans
January 5, 2013, 05:16 PM
I much prefer Lee pistol dies over RCBS pistol dies. Sold the 2 sets of RCBS I had in 380 and 38 Special.

Only been using Lee rifle dies, but I thought I would try a set of Hornady sometime.

bds
January 5, 2013, 05:16 PM
Will I be happy with Lee dies?
I asked the same question to my reloading/shooting mentor when I started shooting USPSA matches.

Since he had both Dillon 550B and Pro 1000 presses, he had me load the same 230 gr RN/5.0 gr W231 loads to range test at 15/25 yards. I got comparable shot groups with both off sand bags and he said if the pistol could not tell the difference, it won't matter.

I have been a happy Lee die user since.

cfullgraf
January 5, 2013, 05:18 PM
Lee dies, themselves, are fine. Personally, I do not like the Lee lock rings. They do not clamp to the die and retain their setting.

Other folks think the rings are great.

jcwit
January 5, 2013, 05:33 PM
I have dies from most every manufacturer and they all work just fine for me, even the Lee Dies work just fine.

I agree with cfullgraf however regarding the rings and have switched all my dies to the split type used by Hornady. This way they hold their setting if I use the same press that I made the setting in.

HKGuns
January 5, 2013, 05:43 PM
I have dies from most every manufacturer and they all work just fine for me, even the Lee Dies work just fine.

I agree with cfullgraf however regarding the rings and have switched all my dies to the split type used by Hornady. This way they hold their setting if I use the same press that I made the setting in.

^^This exactly^^

bds
January 5, 2013, 05:55 PM
I agree on the "O-ring" lock rings on Lee dies but if you use them with turrets to preset the dies for each caliber, they'll stay put when you swap out the turrets. If you are using them for single stage press, lock rings with set screws would do better.

Other folks think the rings are great.
The O-rings do come in handy when I switch bullet types (Say RN to SWC) and need to seat the bullet deeper as I can hand adjust them without having to use an Allen wrench.

DDawg
January 5, 2013, 06:05 PM
I just purchased Lee dies in 40SW, so far I've been very pleased with them. All my other dies are RCBS (which I've also been happy with).
I choose the Lees because of price and the fact they came with the FCD.

Spammy_H
January 5, 2013, 06:05 PM
I started with Lee dies on a Lyman T-Mag turret, and was very happy, but when I switched to the LNL Progressive, I ended up swapping out for Hornady, for a few reasons: 1) I wanted to combine seating / crimping to make space for a powder cop die, and eventually, a bullet feeder; 2) the Lee dies do work, but they're a little short, and the thicker die plate on the LNL AP makes for some difficulty in adjustment. I've heard that some had to move the lock rings to the bottom of the die plate vs. the top in order to get proper adjustment. I didn't find that to be the case with the .45 ACP dies, but they were pretty well bottomed out.

Ifishsum
January 5, 2013, 06:09 PM
Most of my handgun dies are Lee carbide sets, but for rifle dies I tend to prefer others. Haven't had a significant problem with their rifle dies but I just like others a little better. But I almost always buy Lee pistol dies; I like the powder through expander feature.

rogn
January 5, 2013, 06:36 PM
Lee are about all I use at this point except for some wildcats(prefer Redding then). The Lees give good quality handgun ammo, good accuracy. The Lee collet dies give excellent accuracy and consistancy for rifle ammo. Good results in bolt guns, gas guns, revolvers, and auto pistol. What more can you ask for. The O-ring lock ring work well with a witness mark for resetting and the O-ring allows the the die to "float" and stay coaxially aligned.

beatledog7
January 5, 2013, 06:38 PM
I don't buy Lee dies any more.

I have them in .45ACP and .44MAG, and I abhor the way their powder-through expanders catch and go klunk on the out stroke. All my recent handgun die purchases have been RCBS or Hornady.

OTOH, I have a Lee set in .223 that have worked fine. Still, my most recent rifle die buys have been second hand RCBS (late 70s vintage) that are superb.

All my dies have split locking rings.

DC Plumber
January 5, 2013, 09:41 PM
Been using Lee for 15 years and have been very pleased.

45lcshooter
January 5, 2013, 09:49 PM
I've been reloading with Lee dies for some of my calibers for 10 years, haven't worn the dies out yet and no issues.

matworz
January 5, 2013, 09:56 PM
For pistol calibers, I love the Lee carbide 4 die set. For bottleneck rifle, Hornady all day long. Though for my tube magazine rifles, I use the Lee Factory Crimp die as the final step.

Sam1911
January 5, 2013, 10:04 PM
I have many Lee dies and have yet to have a single complaint about them in about 25 years of reloading. They work really well with my Dillon 550.

FROGO207
January 5, 2013, 10:16 PM
I reload 40+ calibers and have a fair selection of all brands of dies, some date from the 50's. Even some brands that are not made anymore. I have more Lee dies than any other brand and only buy carbide dies for straight walled brass. The next die set will probably be Lee also FWIW. I do all my loading on single stage and turret presses exclusively and find the lock rings no problem here.:) YMMV

ranger335v
January 6, 2013, 09:57 AM
I can't tell YOU if you'll be happy with Lee dies but they sell as many as the others put together (some of 'em to me) so .... why not? Ammo is made inside and Lee's insides are as good - or better, on average - than other common dies. (Meaning, on average, no other threaded rifle dies have quite as precise seaters as Forster BR and Redding Comps but clumsy reloading technique will negate even them.)

Some people hate Lee's semi-lock rings, some love 'em; makes no difference to me. I put the dies in and take 'em out correctly and the rings rarely move. When I mess up and they get moved I've never found adusting a die to be very complex or time consuming. ??

Sam1911
January 6, 2013, 10:10 AM
I flip the rings upside down and snug them down onto my Dillon toolhead (some, I think, I put on underneath the tool head, actually) and I've never had one break loose.

mgmorden
January 6, 2013, 10:16 AM
I've never had an issue with Lee dies. Most the of the dies I've bought new were Lee (bought one set of Hornday dies for my .225 Winchester as Lee didn't make dies for that at the time), but I have a lot of sets of various brands that I've bought used. All of the brands - including Lee - will turn out quality ammo.

floydster
January 6, 2013, 10:17 AM
For the money, Lee dies can't be beat, I have Hornady, RCBS, CH, and Lyman dies.

Smokeyloads

kingmt
January 6, 2013, 01:06 PM
I have only used Lee & RCBS. I like Lee better.

If your getting a had yank coming out of the belling die your probably going in to deep. I load for 5 straight wall handgun cases & user Lee dies for all of them. none of mine yank if adjusted correctly.

Otto
January 6, 2013, 01:23 PM
Will I be happy with Lee dies?
You'd be happier with Reddings.

Sam1911
January 6, 2013, 02:08 PM
You'd be happier with Reddings.To load .45ACP? LOL! :D All you'll be is POORER!

springer99
January 6, 2013, 02:15 PM
Will Lee dies produce good, high quality 45ACP ammo? Of course they will!

Will you be happy with that? I don't know.:confused:

RustyFN
January 6, 2013, 02:20 PM
Lee dies will make as good ammo as any other dies. Wether you will like them or not remains to be seen. I use Lee dies on a classic turret and Dillon 550 and they make great ammo for me.

Kachok
January 6, 2013, 02:23 PM
Another happy Lee user here, I prefer them to my RCBS.

Romeo 33 Delta
January 6, 2013, 02:25 PM
No problems with Lee at all. I have them for all my pistol calibers and over half of my rifle calibers. I use other manufacturer's dies when Lee doesn't have what I need. As for the lock rings, yes I like set-screw rings (RCBS) better ... but if you use a die wrench and tighten/loosen the dies to grasp the lock ring ... I've not had a problem in my single stage presses either.

kingmt
January 6, 2013, 04:58 PM
You don't need a wench to tighten them. That is what makes the Orings so great. When switching from one press to another you don't have to need with those set screws.

Mauser lover
January 6, 2013, 05:05 PM
I like Lee. Don't know if you will, some people like to spend more money for the same thing.

jcwit
January 6, 2013, 05:09 PM
You don't need a wench to tighten them. That is what makes the Orings so great. When switching from one press to another you don't have to need with those set screws.


And being as I rarely if ever switch dies from one press to another, even tho I have 6 different presses. And that is precisily why I like the split rings on my dies, once the die is set and the lock ring is locked in place, "notice its named a lock ring and not an adjustable ring" everything is in place unless I change bullets for the seating/crimping die, which in my case I have extras 1 for each bullet shape/weight I reload for that caliber.

Once that puppies set, all adjustment/fussing around is done.

targetshooter22
January 6, 2013, 05:55 PM
My dies are LEE and RCBS. The LEE dies work fine. Lately I've been buying RCBS, not because I think the product is that much better, but because I like their customer service. Or more to the point, I think the balance between customer service and price is good. The customer service I reference is that when I accidentally misused their sizing die and broke the deprimer, they sent me new parts, no questions. I even told them it was my error, not their failure.

cfullgraf
January 6, 2013, 06:01 PM
I agree with what jcwit just said about lock rings. Once mine dies are adjusted for a press, they do not move to another press unless that press gets replaced. So, I like my lock rings firmly locked in place.

I have replaced a press once in thirty years. (Note, I have added several presses during that time).

i do load 223 Remington on my progressive and my single stage press. For 223 Remington, I have two sets of dies, one for each press.

I will agree, if using a tool head (I don't) or bushings like Hornady's L-N-L or Lee's Breech Lock, the Lee lock rings would work fine. But I would jam them down with a wrench and not rely on the o-ring holding.

I do use a Lee o-ring lock ring on my powder cop die on my progressive. This die gets re-adjusted with every cartridge change and at the price of the powder cop die, it is one place I prefer to economize. The Lee lock ring lets me re-adjust the die in a few moments without tools.

I have used my cast off Lee lock rings here and there on powder measures or other places that did not come with a nut and do not need precise positioning. I have jammed two Lee lock nuts together to permanent positioning a time or two when replacement split rings were out of stock. It work but get the adjustment right was a pain.

res7s
January 6, 2013, 06:21 PM
I prefer my Lee dies to my RCBS and Hornady dies. I buy Lee if I'm buying new. If I'm buying NOS I look for Pacific Durachrome, Bonanza, or Redding.

GLOOB
January 6, 2013, 07:05 PM
But I would jam them down with a wrench and not rely on the o-ring holding. Weird. I have to jam down my dies that have a split ring or set screw. If I don't put a wrench to it with a little torque, the whole die may work its way loose by the end of a batch.

I've never had a Lee ring-locked die work loose. I have no problem relying on the O-ring to hold position. It's getting it back to the exact same position every time that's the bother.

Sport45
January 6, 2013, 09:27 PM
You don't need a wench to tighten them.

But it'd be nice if she would... :)

BP44
January 6, 2013, 09:35 PM
Hate to say it but nothing beats a lee FCD, I have been treated very right by rcbs in the past though.

hueyville
January 6, 2013, 09:38 PM
My wench usually just brings coffee when I am loading. At age 17, back in 1979 I bought a set of Lee .44 mag dies for a new pistol. Between being poor high school kid, new pistol, then dies and bullet mold was best could afford. That set of dies has loaded well over 100k rounds with no problems. Even pull out that little one cavity aluminum bullet mold just to keep it from being lonely and forgetting how to work. It is still a good piece also.

I have dies from everyone out there. From micrometer seating dies to carbide rifle and custom wildcat die sets. Price does no scare me. But when buying for caliber don't own a gun in or plan to use a lot, I still pick up Lee dies. Only problem is wasted space on shelf storing round boxes. Hahaha

GT1
January 6, 2013, 09:40 PM
Yeah, I like my sets of Lee dies just fine. The only thing the others brands do is cost more.

I put Lee lock rings on all my dies, they don't back out from finger tight(all they ever need), and they automatically square up.

splattergun
January 6, 2013, 10:41 PM
My dies are LEE and RCBS. The LEE dies work fine. Lately I've been buying RCBS, not because I think the product is that much better, but because I like their customer service. Or more to the point, I think the balance between customer service and price is good. The customer service I reference is that when I accidentally misused their sizing die and broke the deprimer, they sent me new parts, no questions. I even told them it was my error, not their failure.
I had the same CS experience with Lee. Great people.

ArchAngelCD
January 6, 2013, 10:50 PM
Lee dies, themselves, are fine. Personally, I do not like the Lee lock rings. They do not clamp to the die and retain their setting.

Other folks think the rings are great.
I don't think the Lee lock rings are great but they don't bother me either. Since I'm using a Lee 4 hole turret press I don't move the dies after they are set so the O rings on the lock rings work just fine for me. If I had to move the dies at all I would replace the lock rings with RCBS rings like I did on my Lee 30-30 dies I use on a single stage press.

Havok7416
January 6, 2013, 11:37 PM
All of my dies are Lee and I have yet to have a problem with them after over 4,000 loaded rounds to date. There is a slight issue with the locking rings being too fat but that is easily fixed with other rings.

mike.h
January 6, 2013, 11:54 PM
I started reloading 45acp with the LCT and the Lee carbide set which includes the LFC. I have nothing to compare them to, but I have no complaints yet. I also use the Lee set for 9mm and just ordered the 223 set.

mgmorden
January 7, 2013, 12:03 AM
I wouldn't get too concerned about the differences in the lock-rings. If that's the only issue you have with Lee dies, you can buy other companies' lock rings separately:

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/402579/lyman-split-lock-die-locking-ring-7-8-14-thread

You can outfit a 3-die set of those for ~$10, which is less than the price difference between Lee and most of the other brands. Personally though, the Lee lock rings never bothered me. I have bought some of those I linked though, not to replace Lee lock rings, but to replace RCBS ones. I don't mind the split type with the set screw like those above but the RCBS type with the screw that tightens down directly onto the die's threads never sat well with me.

Elkins45
January 7, 2013, 07:56 AM
I agree on the "O-ring" lock rings on Lee dies but if you use them with turrets to preset the dies for each caliber, they'll stay put when you swap out the turrets. If you are using them for single stage press, lock rings with set screws would do better.

+1 to this. All my handgun dies are mounted on turrets, so the Lee lock rings don't pose a problem for me. The dies don't move when I swap turrets, and I've had a couple of those turrets since 1989.

They also work reasonably well in single stage presses as long as you follow Lee's instructions and remove them by the ring and not the die body---but I still would put witness marks on both with a Sharpie if you really want to be sure. Or you can mod them to be lock rings.

I bought my first set of Lee dies in the late 80's before I owned a turret press and used them in a RCBS Reloader Special single stage press. This was the age before the internet so I didn't even know you could buy replacement packs of locking rings from other makers. Being the enterprising sort, I decided I would turn the Lee rings into locking rings. I drilled a hole through the side of each ring, tapped the hole and inserted an appropriately sized screw. 30 years later that same set of dies is still wearing those lock rings and they still haven't moved.

Other than a handful of other brands that were bought when the Lee version was out of stock, I think all my handgun dies are Lee. My general practice is to buy Lee dies for both rifle and handgun if they are in stock.

GLOOB
January 7, 2013, 11:12 AM
I don't mind the split type with the set screw like those above but the RCBS type with the screw that tightens down directly onto the die's threads never sat well with me.
All the lock rings have their quirks.

The split ring type needs to be backed out before the screw is tightened, or you lock your die in the press. So it's the most fiddly to adjust. The kind with the screw-on-thread damages the threads. The Lee rings can accidentally be moved from their set position if you're not careful.

I wonder if it wouldn't be better to augment a Lee ring by adding a split ring above it, rather than replacing it, outright (at least on the dies that have room). Then you have the O-ring to hold the ring to the press, and tightening the split ring would freeze the rings from moving on the die without locking the die in the press. You would still have a +-a 40th of a turn variation, perhaps, when turning in the die hand tight, but that doesn't bother me so much as the possibility of the Lee ring moving ever so slightly any time you handle the die, opening up the possibility of cumulative drift.

The best for me are Lee rings plus a quick change bushing. But they don't fit in all my die boxes.

cfullgraf
January 7, 2013, 11:21 AM
The best for me are Lee rings plus a quick change bushing. But they don't fit in all my die boxes.

Dies with Hornady L-N-L bushings fit in RCBS die storage boxes except one of the saddles near the "clasp" needs to be trimmed out to make room for the bushing's flange where the "clasp" intrudes on the interior of the storage box.

kingmt
January 7, 2013, 02:03 PM
Thanks for pointing out the typo. Little keyboard that my thumb covers about 8 keys. I get a few typos but over all pretty close.

dragon813gt
January 7, 2013, 02:47 PM
The only dies I have that aren't Lee are ones that they don't make. All the Lee's work as they should. So do the Lyman M dies and the RCBS expanders that I have. If Lee made those dies I would buy them first. Because they'd most likely be cheaper and work just as well.


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RustyFN
January 7, 2013, 07:21 PM
And being as I rarely if ever switch dies from one press to another, even tho I have 6 different presses. And that is precisily why I like the split rings on my dies, once the die is set and the lock ring is locked in place, "notice its named a lock ring and not an adjustable ring" everything is in place unless I change bullets for the seating/crimping die, which in my case I have extras 1 for each bullet shape/weight I reload for that caliber.

Once that puppies set, all adjustment/fussing around is done.

JC it's the same with the Lee's with the o-rings. I have never had to reset my dies.

warnerwh
January 7, 2013, 11:22 PM
I've never had a problem with my Lee dies. I also have RCBS but I only bought the RCBS because I didn't like the way the Lee dies fit on the Dillon xl650 I had. The quality of the ammo from one brand to the other is negligible. I don't consider another brand when I buy dies anymore. Also Lee supplies a shell plate. Be confident that Lee dies will keep you happy.

GLOOB
January 7, 2013, 11:32 PM
JC it's the same with the Lee's with the o-rings. I have never had to reset my dies.
Yup. If you rarely take the die out of the press/toolhead, Lee rings are peerless. They stay put, and they're still a snap to adjust. If you're worried they'll move on their own, how do you sleep at night with the knowledge that your seating stem doesn't have a set screw/split lock ring on it?

The major drawback for the Lee rings is experienced by those that frequently swap dies without changing settings.

jcwit
January 7, 2013, 11:50 PM
Yup. If you rarely take the die out of the press/toolhead, Lee rings are peerless. They stay put, and they're still a snap to adjust. If you're worried they'll move on their own, how do you sleep at night with the knowledge that your seating stem doesn't have a set screw/split lock ring on it?

The major drawback for the Lee rings is experienced by those that frequently swap dies without changing

Being as I happen to like reloading with 2 single stage presses set up side by side, I switch dies from press to box and from box to press with every caliber change. This happens to be the way I like to do it, don't ask me why it just is. I have turret presses and plenty of torrents, but I went back to 2 single stage presses.

Therefore I'll stick to my split rings and settings that once set are set till I unset them.

Furthermore as far as the bullet seating stem each caliber and bullet combination I reload for has its own dummy case and bullet set. One of the great uses for the steel cases found all over the ground at most ranges. Not a big challange to check the bullet seating depth using the dummy cartridge before heading into the reloading session.

My dummy cases now amount to close to 100 different combos. Heck, maybe more if I took the time to go count them all up.

I'll even add there times I enjoy returning to my old Lee Loader Kits and reloading a few the old, old way I did a half century ago.

Hondo 60
January 8, 2013, 12:12 AM
Will I be happy with Lee dies?

Yup!
I have 10 sets of dies, 7 are Lee, 1 RCBS, 1 Dillon & 1 Redding.

I bought the RCBS & Dillon dies just cuz of all the good things I've read & the Redding set came with a gun.
I honestly can't see any difference & don't notice any in shooting the ammo.

I won't "waste" my money on the expensive sets any more.
Just my 2 worth. YMMV

splattergun
January 8, 2013, 10:10 AM
I find it curious that no one has mentioned Lee's Lock Ring Eliminator, which is a combination of their quick change bushing and a split ring.http://leeprecision.com/lock-ring-eliminator.html


I bought a set to try out, so far they seem to hold setting just fine.

Elkins45
January 8, 2013, 07:20 PM
I find it curious that no one has mentioned Lee's Lock Ring Eliminator, which is a combination of their quick change bushing and a split ring.http://leeprecision.com/lock-ring-eliminator.html


I bought a set to try out, so far they seem to hold setting just fine.
I can't seem to get them to fit in my Reloader Special :)

splattergun
January 8, 2013, 07:26 PM
:banghead: Well, yeah, they work in the Lee press. Forgot to notice OP is using LNL

But still, they're working for me!

CountGlockulla
January 8, 2013, 07:39 PM
Yes

cfullgraf
January 8, 2013, 09:15 PM
I find it curious that no one has mentioned Lee's Lock Ring Eliminator, which is a combination of their quick change bushing and a split ring.http://leeprecision.com/lock-ring-eliminator.html


I bought a set to try out, so far they seem to hold setting just fine.

What I find interesting is that Lee champions their o-ring lock rings for decades and then come out with the Lock Ring Eliminator for their breech lock bushing press.

I guess it gives their customers the option of using or not using the o-ring.

moonzapa
January 8, 2013, 10:02 PM
I started with Lee dies, scale, etc., that was over 25 years ago. Have moved on to Redding Dies. Lee equipment will get the job done in a minimal manner, but nonetheless the equipment will get the job done. If you decide handloading is not your cup of tea, then you have not broke the bank with Lee products.

Patocazador
January 9, 2013, 09:58 AM
I have mostly Hornady and some RCBS although I do use Lee FCD and a neck die for 223. I am getting into 45 ACP and don't plan on this being a caliber I shot thousands of rounds. I do have a single stage and LNL Progressive.

I am an accuracy/consistency kind of person. Your thoughts?
You may be happy with them but not me. You get what you pay for (most of the time). I think Redding are the best.

jcwit
January 9, 2013, 04:46 PM
You may be happy with them but not me. You get what you pay for (most of the time).

Then there are times one gets much more than they pay for. Like a like new 1947 Winchester Model 52 B complete with all but the box it came in, even had the hang tags for the outlandish sum of $50.00. That also encluded the Lyman Target Spot scope.

If Lee products were so lacking they would have gone by the wayside long ago.

Sport45
January 9, 2013, 08:16 PM
Some people aren't happy with anything.

Whether or not Lee dies make the OP happy has a lot more to do with the OP than the dies.

Legion489
February 9, 2013, 12:04 PM
Lee dies work fine. Are they as good as other dies? PRECISION SHOOTING MAG did a test several years ago and the finding was Redding, Dillon, Forster were the best (they also cost it), then RCBS, with both Lee and Lyman in last place. That said, NONE of the dies were really bad, but some were finished better, loaded smoother, had higher tolerances, easier to use, had nicer features, easier to adjust, easier to take apart/clean, etc.

If you can afford Redding, get Redding. Dillon and Forster have a limited selection but are equal to anything out there. RCBS is next and RCBS and Lee are running neck and neck for dies in my collection, especially in pistol dies (the idea that I don't like Lee is promoted by fools and liars that want to attack and smear me for their own reasons). I like the four die deluxe Lee pistol die sets as I really like the FCD. Some people don't like them, others do, take your pick.

thump_rrr
February 9, 2013, 07:55 PM
I have a LnL AP Progressive myself and own both Lee and Hornady dies in .45ACP.
There are 2 problems with Lee dies being used in a LnL.
The Lee dies are shorter than Hornady dies so they are bottomed out with the lock rings barely hanging on.
Secondly they don't fit in the Lee die box with the Hornady bushings installed.

As far as the dies making good ammo there is no problem there.

jack44
February 9, 2013, 07:57 PM
Lee's are good for the price but most of my dies are RCBS$$$

savanahsdad
February 9, 2013, 08:32 PM
My die shelf has Red boxes, Blue boxes, and Green boxes on it , all work good , but for handgun loads Lee is all I use and for most rifle loads I use Redding , soon to be all Redding for Rifle , but I wont give up My Lee's for handgun loads ,
so YES go with the Lee for your 45acp , that's what I use for my 45acp in a Loadmaster 5 stage:)

RE-15
February 9, 2013, 09:31 PM
Money is not a issue for me and I still buy Lee dies.

Hondo 60
February 9, 2013, 10:11 PM
Some people aren't happy with anything.

Whether or not Lee dies make the OP happy has a lot more to do with the OP than the dies.

Thou hast spaketh a truth! :eek:

GT1
February 9, 2013, 11:21 PM
I think some folks just can't get around the difference in price, so something so much cheaper has to have drawbacks even though they can't be seen nor shown from experience. This is especially true when same naysayers already own the expensive alternative, it(the expensive alternative) must be defended. ;)

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