Displaying handguns in the home?


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Saakee
January 6, 2013, 12:39 AM
All right, so when Longarms are displayed they're sometimes hung on hooks or racks or deer heads or in glass fronted gun cabinets but how does one display a handgun aside from in a shadow box or those magwell stands? I don't have a display worthy sidearm but it's been on my mind for the past few weeks.

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bannockburn
January 6, 2013, 06:58 PM
Well you could Google "handgun display cabinets" to get some ideas as to how it can be done, including some companies that make brackets and holders if you didn't want to go the cabinet route.

Personally I'm not into openly displaying firearms in my home, but I could see having something like a small display cabinet in a private area, like a den or an office, of the house.

HDCamel
January 6, 2013, 08:17 PM
While my Dan Wesson is out of action (looking for a new cylinder-stop spring) it's hanging on my bedroom wall.

smalls
January 6, 2013, 09:10 PM
My FIL uses small, stubby wood pegs. One under the barrel, and one in the trigger guard, behind the trigger. Hardly noticeable, and looks good.

kayakersteve
January 6, 2013, 09:26 PM
Try ridgebackracks.com. Can display and be secure as well. I have for my long guns, but also make for handguns

F-111 John
January 6, 2013, 10:29 PM
While my Dan Wesson is out of action (looking for a new cylinder-stop spring)

EWK Arms small frame parts kit. Add a hand spring and I also highly recommend the fiber optic sights.

http://www.ewkarms.com/zen8/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=12

PabloJ
January 6, 2013, 10:48 PM
Walls are for oil paintings while gun safes are for guns.

AlexanderA
January 6, 2013, 10:57 PM
If you're going to display handguns (or any guns, for that matter) in the home, you need to have really good perimeter security, and really good screening of who comes in. Short of turning your home into a fortress, keep the guns out of sight. Sorry, but I'm paranoid about this. The only guns on open view in my house are two original flintlocks (and not particularly valuable ones at that).

KC&97TA
January 6, 2013, 11:01 PM
I have a dream of a man cave / gun room, kid free, safe room type place... coffee table with glass top, red velvet type lineing, led lighting.

modify something like this table pictured, could be modified to lock or screw closed.

http://www.shipshewanafurniture.com/images/lancaster_glass_coffee_table.jpg


link to website
http://www.shipshewanafurniture.com/product_info.php?cPath=1_6&products_id=4305&osCsid=9ehsm62s7ddrv539es8jolegs5

ApacheCoTodd
January 7, 2013, 02:00 PM
I had to give up one level of a book case but sure do like the results.

I walk the whole rack to the safe when we're away.

Jim K
January 7, 2013, 03:51 PM
Your home is not the Smithsonian; keep the guns out of sight! That does not mean at least one cannot be very handy, just that guns be out of view of the casual visitor.

There have been several cases in which a meter reader, telephone repairman, or plumber saw a gun in a home and panicked. At best the police come and harass the home owner; at worst, an anti-gun mayor like Bloomberg orders the SWAT team to riddle the house with bullets and kill everyone inside, just for the fun of it.

Keep the guns out of sight.

Jim

Girodin
January 7, 2013, 04:13 PM
There have been several cases in which a meter reader, telephone repairman, or plumber saw a gun in a home and panicked. At best the police come and harass the home owner; at worst, an anti-gun mayor like Bloomberg orders the SWAT team to riddle the house with bullets and kill everyone inside, just for the fun of it.

I'd be MUCH more worried about it being stolen. So long as you are not a restricted person, nor displaying a gun that is patently illegal there is no grounds for the police to come harass you. My guess is in most locals the police have much better things to do than to check up on a report of a, most likely, legally owned gun that was simply sitting in a display case in someones home. Typically, cops investigate reports of crime, not legal activity. They may come out for something that is ambiguous. If they knock on the door you can simply ask them to leave without so much as opening the door. They would be so far from probable cause, seeing as guns are legal to own and have in one's home, it is hard to over state it.

Police: Knock, knock

Home Owner: *through closed door* Who is it?

Police: It's the police, may we have a word with you?

HO: Do you have a warrant?

Police: No, you are not in trouble or anything; we just want to talk to you for a minute

HO: Am I free to leave?

Police: Yes, but we just need to speak to you? i[Note if the say no they have seized you in violation of the 4th amendment.

HO: No thank you. Please leave. Good day.

I can deal with such "harassment." Much beyond that becomes a 4th amendment violation that be be dealt with more aggressively through proper legal channels by the home owner.

There have been several cases in which a meter reader, telephone repairman, or plumber saw a gun in a home and panicked.

Citation? Result of this panic?

CraigC
January 7, 2013, 04:49 PM
Firstly, nobody should be able to peek into a window or door of your home and see anything. Secondly, it's your house, display your guns if you want to. I'm sorry but I have to disagree with the Chicken Littles and safety police, as usual. A firearm is not unlike any other object. Display it if you like, it's your business. My house was broken into 18 months ago and everything that would fit through the busted window was carried away but it was a new house and I had yet to move my guns into it. However, I refuse to give in to this level of paranoia.

Been wanting to do a Civil War/Old West shadow box that will hang in my office.

sean326
January 7, 2013, 06:28 PM
If I attached the pic correctly this is a phelps 45-70 revolver in my study.
The display box I found online. It had to be tweaked a little, it wasn't designed
For that size gun. The rounds in front of it are a 45-70 and a 44mag.

Sorry it got turned sideways.

Jim NE
January 7, 2013, 08:02 PM
I remember being in a house where several black powder revolvers were on display. One was just on a stand in a glass curio cabinet alongside other non-gun knick knacks. Not a bad effect.

The other two were more conspicuous - out on coffee tables or something, and I didn't like that as much. They were all repro guns that hadn't been fired much, if any, so they were all pretty clean.

Girodin
January 8, 2013, 03:01 AM
A firearm is not unlike any other object.

Actually it is in several respects. It is a lot like my power tools. They have a lot of utility and there is nothing inherently bad about them. However, the can cause harm in the wrong hands and are an item thieves seems to be attracted to. I don't like people seeing exactly where they are kept. I don't want kids getting a hold of them.

My house was broken into 18 months ago and everything that would fit through the busted window was carried away but it was a new house and I had yet to move my guns into it. However, I refuse to give in to this level of paranoia.

So, your guns weren't stolen but for the fact you hadn't moved them in yet but you think folks that are worried their guns could be stolen are paranoid. Break ins sadly are not that uncommon. I had a break in, my guns were in a safe and as such I still have them all. If they weren't in the safe they would have certainly gone the way of my snowboard and TV, which I never saw again.

The fact is many folks have a valuable enough gun collection that not getting a safe is just folly. Having a gun safe saved me many times its value. And that is to say nothing of sentimental value of a number of those guns.

Being worried their could be a break in and taking measures against it is pretty far from paranoia. Statistically it is much more likely than say being a victim of a crime where you could use your gun for self defense, but how many of us carry. I guess you believe that is senseless paranoia as well.

Display it if you like, it's your business

It may not apply to all of use, but in a number of states have child access prevention laws that may need to be accounted for.

swathdiver
January 8, 2013, 03:11 AM
The black powder community has display stands made for revolvers. You can get them from cabelas, midwayusa, possibleshop, jedediah-starr, etc.

CraigC
January 8, 2013, 12:35 PM
So, your guns weren't stolen but for the fact you hadn't moved them in yet but you think folks that are worried their guns could be stolen are paranoid.
Altering your life for fear of something statistically insignificant is what I have a problem with. And yes, I have $50,000 invested in my collection but I'll be damned if I'm going to let the criminal element dictate how I live my life. Yes, a safe is a good idea but do you put every single thing you own in a safe? No. Do you put your kitchen knives in a safe? No. Like I said, it is your own business. If you want to display your guns, do it. Any adult who is not a half wit knows the risks involved if there is a break-in. You run the risk of dying every time you get up in the morning and drive to work but you still go, correct?

Not everybody has kids running around to be concerned with. Some folks just can't see past their own noses.

ApacheCoTodd
January 8, 2013, 12:52 PM
Your home is not the Smithsonian; keep the guns out of sight! That does not mean at least one cannot be very handy, just that guns be out of view of the casual visitor.
Keep the guns out of sight.
Jim
As a matter of fact - it most certainly is. My very own tiny little museum with items which might otherwise be hidden away and not enjoyed as they are now.

Aye gawd! It just occurred to me looking at the photos that I even have ammo displayed with some of the firearms. Not to worry Y'all. Zero and I mean Zeeero kids' access to my blasters.

CraigC
January 8, 2013, 12:54 PM
You've got some good books too! ;)

PabloJ
January 8, 2013, 01:21 PM
Pretty soon gun owners with unsecured guns left at home will be held liable if they're stolen. If guns were left on display or nightstand drawer they will no longer be able to own firearms legally. You have to remember most guns in hands of criminals were once owned by those who could buy them legally.

Girodin
January 8, 2013, 01:21 PM
Altering your life for fear of something statistically insignificant is what I have a problem with.

Oh yeah, that is just soooo crazy. I'm glad I don't take the time to buckle seat belt. Having health insurance, to say nothing of paying for that life insurance, or malpractice insurance, is just stupid. Why alter my life by missing out on that money for statistically remote possibilities. When I do wood or metal work, I don't bother to put on safety glasses. I refuse to let some unlikely event dictate how I live my life.

Just a question do you carry a gun?

How statistically insignificant is it if you actually experienced it already? I don't live in a bad neighborhood (actually home burglars often operate in affluent ones) and had a two break ins. I'm pretty sure one was the neighbors drug addict kid, they were great people and good friends BTW (I'm intimately familiar with a similar case where the drug addict kid did a hot burglary of family friends, the friends stumbled across him and he murdered one of them, beat her to death with a bat actually). Between having an alarm and a safe it greatly mitigated losses.

Not everybody has kids running around to be concerned with. Some folks just can't see past their own noses.

And some folks seem to lack very, very basic reading comprehension. Or, perhaps, they are just so focused on taking a shot at someone they ignore what was actually written. You will note I specifically typed:

It may not apply to all of us[] . . .

I can see how you thought I was saying it was applicable to you and every other person and that I cannot see past my own nose. And of course you are making some big assumptions, as I never said whether I have kids or not.

Yes, a safe is a good idea but do you put every single thing you own in a safe? No. Do you put your kitchen knives in a safe?

Obviously not. This argument is of course a false dichotomy, the big fat phony either or. Because I don't lock up everything doesn't mean it is a better idea to not lock up anything. My safe isn't as secure as my safety deposit box, and I don't keep everything in one of those. I can tell you if I get a kitchen knife that is worth $10k+ I'll likely start. I can also tell you that in no home burglary I am familiar with did the thieves take the kitchen knives.

If you don't want to lock up your guns, that is your prerogative. However, what I take exception to is your suggestion that people that are concerned with burglary, or other forms of unauthorized access, and thus keep theirs in a safe are some how operating based on paranoia.

You run the risk of dying every time you get up in the morning and drive to work but you still go, correct?

Yeah (well actually, I don't have to go to work everyday, some folks cannot see past their own nose, but lest's say agruendo that I do), but I wear a seat belt, have a car with airbags all over it, try my best to drive prudently and defensively. I also carry insurance in case of a wreck or my untimely death. So in other words while I cannot eliminate all risk, I take the prudent steps to mitigate risk in ways that I can. Once again we see it is not really an either or. Furthermore, your analogy breaks down badly because the consequences of not working or alternately stated the utility of going to work. The harm of not going vastly outweighs the relative risk of death in traveling to work. The same cannot be said for leaving guns out and unsecured.

In sum, what you have failed to realize is that it is not a matter of paranoia, or letting others dictate one's life. Rather it is cold hard basic risk assessment.

CraigC
January 8, 2013, 02:24 PM
The point is that it is not criminally insane to NOT lock up your guns at all times. You're taking offense just as you are being offensive. The point is that one may 'choose' not to subscribe to the paranoid belief that having guns not locked in a safe will make you more likely to be a victim. No, I don't think you're paranoid to lock all your guns in a safe at all times but at the same time, not everybody who chooses not to is a naive fool. Pot, meet kettle. It is a personal choice and neither is right or wrong.


I can also tell you that in no home burglary I am familiar with did the thieves take the kitchen knives.
Yeah? When they broke into ours they took bedding, dishes, pillow cases, towels, everything they could carry through the broken window. Had they not opened the door to the garage and set off the alarm, they would've taken all the copper out of the house and A/C unit.


I can see how you thought I was saying it was applicable to you and every other person and that I cannot see past my own nose. And of course you are making some big assumptions, as I never said whether I have kids or not.....Yeah (well actually, I don't have to go to work everyday, some folks cannot see past their own nose, but lest's say agruendo that I do)
I make no assumptions. All I do is respond to the words on the screen. I work from home so I guess I can't see past my own nose either. :rolleyes:


In sum, what you have failed to realize is that it is not a matter of paranoia, or letting others dictate one's life.
It is to me. Sorry but when I read posts #8 and #11, that impresses upon me as being VERY paranoid. I apologize for not being one that sits around worrying about things I cannot do anything about.


You sure are getting defensive. I'd suggest taking a chill pill before you hurt yourself. Nobody spit on your dog or said anything about your momma so there's no reason to get bent outta shape. So you can stuff the cheap comments about reading comprehension and perspective.

swathdiver
January 8, 2013, 04:19 PM
Pretty soon gun owners with unsecured guns left at home will be held liable if they're stolen. If guns were left on display or nightstand drawer they will no longer be able to own firearms legally. You have to remember most guns in hands of criminals were once owned by those who could buy them legally.


Are you saying that there is a move to make it felony to leave your gun ready to go in the nightstand?

Girodin
January 8, 2013, 11:52 PM
one may 'choose' not to subscribe to the paranoid belief that having guns not locked in a safe will make you more likely to be a victim

That is not a paranoid belief. It is very nearly a truism. A gun in safe is harder to steal than a gun that is not. Furthermore, "advertising" what you have makes it more likely to be stolen. Anyone involved in law enforcement or security will tell you that.

I will say I think post #11 and the part about police is a little out there and not based in reality.

I apologize for not being one that sits around worrying about things I cannot do anything about.

Well, that's just the thing, you could very easily do something about a lot of those things. You could, oh I don't know, have a safe. A decent alarm system helps a lot too. I don't sit around and worry about such things either, but I do take easy, responsible, steps to mitigate risk. Its actually a little hard for me to understand why someone would willfully refuse to do so.

All I do is respond to the words on the screen.

Not really. I stated in general terms that CAP laws may need to be accounted for, but noted it might not apply to all of us and you accused me of having a myopic view of things. I'm not sure how that was responding to the words on the screen at all. I do find it interesting that when I "spoke" back to you the same way you thought it was offensive, how ironic.

Do what you think is prudent, and situations and risks vary, but don't expect not to get a little push back from folks when you call them paranoid for suggesting a gun would be more secure in a safe.

ApacheCoTodd
January 8, 2013, 11:57 PM
So - instead of taking this down the route of getting the thread locked for a pissing match, how about some more display options?

I know I'd like to see some non-permanent (shadow boxes scare me) profile display options for revolvers.

kayakersteve
January 9, 2013, 04:51 PM
Ridgeback racks.com ....... 'Nuff said

Zoogster
January 9, 2013, 05:05 PM
I would be against leaving handguns on display.

Handguns are what is generally sought for criminal use, and leaving them on display announces an available source of multiple firearms to both those who see them, and whoever they talk to about them.

That woman you think is not an issue has a friend that is friends with or a family member of the meth addict on the other side of town. While innocently talking about things information gets passed and extends beyond just those you invite into your home directly.



Long guns on the other hand may be stolen, but due to being less convenient for criminal transport and use are not sought out like handguns. Precautions should still be taken, especially for multiple. But handguns take it to a whole different level. If someone knows they can smash a window to get a handgun or multiple just sitting there, and be gone in 10-20 seconds because they don't have to deal with any other barriers or even search around, it will be an appealing target.





Additionally there is laws in some states that make it a crime to allow a child to get ahold of your firearm.
While this does not apply to the child that breaks into your home, it does apply to the child a guest brings over that steals that firearm and takes it to school.
They might not steal the several foot rifle hanging on the wall, but the handgun that can be concealed from sight...
Unexpected vistors don't allow for child proofing your home before you let people under 18 come in. Telling family or friends they cannot bring thier child they showed up with inside is also not going to make you very popular.
Additionally if someone else has the keys they also could bring a child or allow a guest with a child to come over and still get you into trouble.
Your wife or girlfriend or family member that may not think about such things as quickly may have company that brings a child.

rondog
January 9, 2013, 06:06 PM
I'd LOVE to have a secure enough room in my house to be able to display my guns as I wished. I'd have 'em all over the place. But, this would require a concrete vault with a Ft. Knox vault door, which I ain't got.

But I do have two of these shadow boxes from Hobby Lobby (this one's not mine), they're pretty cheap. The neat part is, the glass front is hinged, so you can open the box and take the pistol out easily to put it in the safe, and just leave the box mounted to the wall. I haven't used either of mine yet, I don't really have a good display spot and the wife ain't too keen on the idea either.

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b150/rinselman/guns/misc%201911s/displaycase01.jpg

justice06rr
January 9, 2013, 10:31 PM
Locked display cabinets (with plexy-glass windows) are my suggestion.

if you choose to display them openly, make sure they are unloaded, not functional, or hide/store the ammo elsewhere.

kayakersteve
January 10, 2013, 09:48 AM
http://www.flickr.com/photos/90874925@N06/8366630001/

hq
January 11, 2013, 09:29 AM
Locked display cabinets (with plexy-glass windows) are my suggestion.

I've thought about using a sheet of leftover 5x7', 1" thick 6-layer armored glass to build a wall-mounted display case with a hardened steel frame. It can be secured to a concrete wall with about a dozen anchor bolts and have secured hinges and a comb-type locking mechanism. Basically a gun safe, disguised as a display case.

Being very visible might still be a problem. Alarm system is always a good idea, but a determined professional could probably open a case like that with an angle grinder in a few minutes. Cutting the power from all sockets in the room might slow a thief down, but knowing what gasoline powered power cutters are capable of, I much rather keep my guns in a real safe.

PabloJ
January 11, 2013, 09:44 AM
Guns are not for displaying.

Manny
January 11, 2013, 09:52 AM
I live alone and seldom have visitors other than immediate family or close friends. Still I try to be low key and discrete about any valuables, not just guns. Why advertise and provide temptation or make yourself a target?

MR2Aaron
January 11, 2013, 10:13 AM
I can actually imagine making a display case that would be secure enough. You'd just want to be careful to put it in a private room.

For instance, something that looks like this:
http://www.custom-guncabinet.com/extra%20pages/wall%20pistol%20case.html

Fake edit: Actually, that one looks like it already has most of the features I'd design into it, plus a few others I hadn't thought of.

The trick would be to use very thick lucite for the "glass" part, and securely reinforce the channel it fits into. You'd also want to use a better locking mechanism than the one shown - fancy bulletproof polycarbonate doesn't do you any good if the bad guy can just force the door open.

I've actually used these plans to make a 4-pistol rack, which I keep locked away.
http://7.62x54r.net/MosinID/MosinRacks05.htm

mcdonl
January 11, 2013, 10:18 AM
I love how everyone thinks we all live in the same environment. Just because some of you chose to live in areas where meter readers are scared of guns, or armed bandits patrol the night looking for gun displays to steal does not mean we all do.

I also love the hypocracy... Who says guns are not for display? Man people on here tick me off.

MR2Aaron
January 11, 2013, 10:21 AM
Guns are not for displaying.

Depends on the gun. A flintlock musket isn't really all that great for much else these days, but hell if it isn't neat to look at.

GCBurner
January 11, 2013, 10:46 AM
A neighbor with a big house on the river had a beautiful wall display of about 50 antique black powder pistols and early revolvers on the wall of his living room, in lighted glass-front cases. The burglars came by boat one night while the family was out of town, smashed the glass, and stole every one of them. They didn't get the more modern pieces in a heavy-duty gun safe, though.

shinyroks
January 11, 2013, 10:54 AM
I've thought about using a sheet of leftover 5x7', 1" thick 6-layer armored glass to build a wall-mounted display case with a hardened steel frame. It can be secured to a concrete wall with about a dozen anchor bolts and have secured hinges and a comb-type locking mechanism. Basically a gun safe, disguised as a display case.

Being very visible might still be a problem. Alarm system is always a good idea, but a determined professional could probably open a case like that with an angle grinder in a few minutes. Cutting the power from all sockets in the room might slow a thief down, but knowing what gasoline powered power cutters are capable of, I much rather keep my guns in a real safe.
Not much short of a bank or government vault is going to stop (or even slow) a determined professional. Especially if they have resources like a gas-powered saw. Even your top end browning safes are no match for that, so I see it as a bit of a stretch to use that as an excuse for not displaying your arms in a lightweight home made safe.

F-111 John
January 11, 2013, 01:54 PM
Guns are not for displaying.

The NRA's National Firearms Museum (http://www.nramuseum.org/)might have a different opinion.

hq
January 11, 2013, 03:52 PM
Not much short of a bank or government vault is going to stop (or even slow) a determined professional. Especially if they have resources like a gas-powered saw. Even your top end browning safes are no match for that, so I see it as a bit of a stretch to use that as an excuse for not displaying your arms in a lightweight home made safe.

The actual gun vault is several feet underground, surrounded by bedrock, reinforced concrete and a gas-filled vault door, with a wireless, UPS backed up online alarm system to a security company with a guaranteed 6 minute response time. That's my baseline, not a commercial safe. You can also guess where the spare sheet of armored glass came from. ;)

While this is very nice and quiet neighborhood, I still prefer not having guns visible from windows. It doesn't help that the whole south facade of the house is glass, from floor to ceiling. Just a personal choice, nothing else.

Girodin
January 11, 2013, 04:16 PM
So - instead of taking this down the route of getting the thread locked for a pissing match, how about some more display options?

http://www.southlandsafes.com/titan2008.jpg

:D

CraigC
January 11, 2013, 07:54 PM
Well, that's just the thing, you could very easily do something about a lot of those things. You could, oh I don't know, have a safe. A decent alarm system helps a lot too. I don't sit around and worry about such things either, but I do take easy, responsible, steps to mitigate risk. Its actually a little hard for me to understand why someone would willfully refuse to do so.
I never said I did or did not have a safe. I certainly did NOT say NOT to use a safe. I only alluded to having a security system but that is not really the discussion. It is not whether to keep your guns in a safe or not. It is not even whether or not to display them. The question was 'how' to display them.

I would never assume that meant all or even most of them anyway. Totally impractical for me because I own nearly 80 and could not possibly display them all, even if I wanted to.

IMHO, some people are just weird about these things. :scrutiny:


Why advertise and provide temptation or make yourself a target?
Who exactly are you guys "advertising" to??? Personally, I don't invite strangers into my house and I have this wonderful invention on all the windows. They're called blinds, then over them is a set of curtains. So hopefully any passersby cannot see what is in my house. Nor can your average peeping tom. So I'm confused by this advertisement reference that's popped up in this thread several times. If I have a sixgun in a shadow box in my office, who exactly is going to see it and then decide to break into my home???


I love how everyone thinks we all live in the same environment. Just because some of you chose to live in areas where meter readers are scared of guns, or armed bandits patrol the night looking for gun displays to steal does not mean we all do.

I also love the hypocracy... Who says guns are not for display? Man people on here tick me off.
Agreed.

Girodin
January 12, 2013, 12:04 AM
Who exactly are you guys "advertising" to???

As an attorney, who worked in prosecution, let me tell you that a lot of burglaries are committed by people who have a connection to the home. Not all of them are, but enough that its, to me at least, disconcerting. In short anyone who comes in your home and anyone who they might talk to and make mention of what they saw. You may never have a delivery guy, a repair man, a carpet cleaner or a maid come into your house. You may never entertain or have events at your home. You may not every have work associates, and perhaps their families over. You may never have a friend come over who brings a date or friend. You may not let the neighbors in, etc Lots of people do though. Many of those things are pretty common.

A lot of times it is someone who has been there or who hears about something from someone who has been there.

Again it doesn't mean that if you do all those things you will have a break in. It does increase chances.

I think its up to individuals to make choices for themselves. They should be making an informed choice though.

blkbrd666
January 12, 2013, 12:29 AM
Yep, that's what I do to display my guns. I just come home every day and open the safe door, turn on the lights and sit down and look at them. :neener:

ApacheCoTodd
January 12, 2013, 02:42 PM
Geeze - you'd think this thread was being overtaken by THEM given how many folk are telling me how, where, when and under what conditions I should enjoy my firearms in addition to the posts intimating that one should almost adopt the position of shame for owning let alone displaying them.

As with all things - I'll operate within the law and take my lumps when and if things go south. Nannieists not withstanding.

PabloJ
January 12, 2013, 10:25 PM
Just trying to help prevent guns from being stolen and fall into wrong hands strengthening hand of those who wish to ban them. I would like to be able to hold on to two I have. I hope you don't mind.

SFsc616171
January 12, 2013, 10:33 PM
I'm a writer. How many 'elder edition', 'big', dictionaries do you think are on my shelves? How many 'old', er, out-of-print large editions of something might I have about the house? If I were to say, for the sake of the question asked, that I were not of the Abrahamic faith, who would question having an old 'family style bible', somewhere in sight?

Yet, to directly answer your question, as it was stated, "Your house is NOT the Smithsonian Museum." And, in these days, where the beloved 'Homeland Security' team wants to know everything, through anybody snitching about anything, it is not wise to display such things.

PabloJ
January 13, 2013, 01:57 AM
Okie dokie when I used to get The Sporting Gazette and The Field I came across something
Avant Grande for country villa. Mitt Romney Style if you will. Google THE BESPOKE GUN CABINETS Company. Much is possible if one has lots of money.

CraigC
January 13, 2013, 02:38 AM
Oh no, I have $2600 worth of leatherbound books just sitting on shelves right there in the open!!! What will I do if the milkman sees them in the window and talks to the paper boy about it, who talks to the hardware salesman about it, while a burglar is listening in the hardware store, buying tools for his next job??? Should I put them in a safe too???

I've had people break into my house and it has had a profound effect on my wife and I. Somebody else stole tools out of my truck just last year. I trust no one whom I don't know and am basically anti-social. Yet some of the posts in this thread sound like the silly example I just gave. The worst part is, nobody asked for your opinion on whether or not to display guns in their home.

vito
January 13, 2013, 11:32 AM
I fully understand the desire to display your guns; sometimes I enjoy just taking my guns out of the safe and looking at them, handling them, etc. But displaying them is more risky that I would be comfortable with, and having young grandchildren who often visit I would not want to risk forgetting to lock them up in advance. This thread reminds me of the many ones on putting NRA stickers on your car, or wearing a gun related t-shirt when out at the mall, etc. I don't need the public to give me recognition for my enjoyment of, and ownership of guns. I don't need to try to impress folks that I am a person not to be messed with, because I HAVE A GUN! As a somewhat overweight, white haired senior citizen I probably do not attract much attention, so my ownership and possibly carrying of a self defense weapon is my business and only mine. Truthfully, having a wife of over 40 years duration who has always feared and disliked guns and everything to do with them, I don't even tell me wife when I am carrying. I achieve my purpose of having a gun available just in case it is needed, but without attracting anyone else's attention or interest both inside and outside of my home.

Dr.Rob
January 13, 2013, 11:37 AM
I visited a law office once with an impressive display of handguns in a glass fronted shallow bookcase in their deposition/conference room. It was tastefully done and contained the only Borchardt I've ever seen up close.

I have another friend who made a nice shadowbox display with a working mix-master Colt SAA.

It's not for everyone, but I can understand the allure of the 'display' pieces.

blarby
January 13, 2013, 12:19 PM
Guns are not for displaying.

Obviously, a personal choice- not a definition.

If I had a pedestal, I would put my wifes Kimber Royall II on it- It certainly deserves it.

I have random pieces on "display" : On shelves, in corners, etc. No kids, many pro IIa friends, and a relatively * knock on hardwood* low crime area.

I'm home more often than not, and like having things within reach.

The art gallery and position change frequently.... This has been a good year for art :)

ApacheCoTodd
January 13, 2013, 12:31 PM
Just trying to help prevent guns from being stolen and fall into wrong hands strengthening hand of those who wish to ban them. I would like to be able to hold on to two I have. I hope you don't mind.

I'm sure I and others like me in fact do not mind. We just ask that the treatment of those who have made a hopefully responsible decision given their particular situation are not minded either.

This "oh what if...?" discussion is from like page 1 or 2 of any anti anything group's book of arguments.

Display it in a private room or on you hip or on a rifle rack in a pick-up and some "pro-gun" appeaser will always sound off with how that might hurt him.

Some one may well have used a car that was stolen from our home by taking the keys from the key bowl (while we were in the mountains) to kill someone else in a traffic incident. Gad zooks! batten the hatches, pull up the draw bridge and recognize that this is a world we're handing over to talking heads, Oprah and attorneys.

I'm pretty sure that right now there are several folk across America potentially doing more damage to my right to keep and bear arms by publicly firing an AK derivative with a 30 round magazine in a rambunctious manner than the (RESPONSIBLE) open display of my firearms will ever cause.
But the difference between myself and the appeasers is that I support their right to joyfully and legally enjoy their AK in any legal manner which they see fit.

While I recognize that many do not have the opportunity and facility to openly display their favorite arms even if they want to - recognize that I and others in fact have the ability to do so. And just back off a touch or two please.

Trent
January 13, 2013, 12:52 PM
Someone trying to break in to my house and cart away goods would have an awful time of it here. :)

Chances of survival or successful escape? Slim.

There's so many factors which contribute to security (inside and outside), arrangements with neighbors, only one point of egress from the community, etc.

I picked where I live for a reason, and, leaving a high crime neighborhood, security was at the top of my list. When house shopping I rejected 26 otherwise flawless homes that met our basic criteria before deciding upon the one in which I presently reside.

If you manage to get past whoever's home, my dogs, my cameras, my other security measures, and get OUT past my neighbors (several of whom have written permission to carry firearms on my land), and the police who would (by then) be blocking the only road of egress to this community, you've definitely earned what cargo you have through blood, sweat, and tears. It'll cost you.

So yeah, I feel just fine keeping a couple of select rifles on display.

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