Casting bullets


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tjcolt45
January 9, 2013, 09:57 AM
Does anyone cast their own bullets? Do you use wheel weights? Do you have to remove the steel clips? Do you have to pay for these weights or can you find them free? Is this economically a good thing? Thanks!

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eam3clm@att.net
January 9, 2013, 10:11 AM
I primary cast with wheel weights. I normally melt them down in a cast iron pot and pour into ingot molds before I use them. This will nelt off the steel clip and remove any debris. This keeps my furnance cleaner. You will have to check with your tire dealers in your area. If you cant find any there then check the sell section of this fourm as well as castboolts. They come up fo sale often as well as ebay

Patocazador
January 9, 2013, 10:37 AM
If you can find any kind of free lead, gobble it up. Tire shops sell their scrap weights to recyclers. Maybe a friendly owner would sell some to you at the same price but usually they don't want to upset the status quo.

If your dentist still uses an older-type x-ray machine, the film backings are made of a lead alloy. Sometimes they have to pay for the "hazardous material" to be disposed of. If you go by and pick it up for free EVERY month, you might have a good source. If you get some from him/her, make sure you are dependable and continue to pick it up on a regular schedule so he can save the fee.
The newer digital x-rays don't use normal film.

USSR
January 9, 2013, 11:13 AM
As eam3clm@att.net said, you melt wheelweights down in a cast iron pot and cast them into ingots. As the lead melts, the steel clips separate from the lead and are scooped out, along with a lot of dirt. However, good luck finding any lead wheelweights. The government is forcing the tire shops to switch to steel and zinc. The lead wheelweight is going the way of linotype, as in no longer readily available.

Don

wgaynor
January 9, 2013, 11:19 AM
I cast my own. I buy wheelweights for $20 per 5 gallon bucket at local tire shop. Maintenance men at work and friends give me lead for free.

When casting, melt the lead wheelweights in a separate pot than you will cast bullets in. This is because you don't want to cast good bullets from a dirty pot.

Place the wheelweights in the pot and heat it up. Provide plenty of ventilation, wear a mask, or whatever suits you. That stuff produces a foul odor and fumes (the crud on the lead makes the odor).

The lead melts and the zinc weights and metal clips float to the surface. skim with a slotted spoon to remove the zin and clips.

Flux with a bit of wax or sawdust or some other form of carbon and stir. Skim the top and pour your ingots. Beware of the tinsel fairy.

wgaynor
January 9, 2013, 11:21 AM
By the way, stockpiling lead ingots in preparation of the EPA crackdown on lead is very easy. Just store your ingots in a corner of your workshop or shed. Doesn't take up much space. I keep about 300-400lbs of ingots on hand and never have them take up much room (they are stackable).

tjcolt45
January 9, 2013, 11:21 AM
Is it worth it to use flux when melting the lead?

kerreckt
January 9, 2013, 11:28 AM
I only thing I can add about processing wheelweights is to watch your temperature and keep it below about 700F so that you don't risk melting any of the zinc weights which will be in your pot. Also, stay up wind because you don't want to be breathing any of the fumes from your melting pot. This http://castboolits.gunloads.com/forum.php website has all the info you will need. Good luck. Besides being very economical I have found casting bullets very enjoyable.

jmorris
January 9, 2013, 11:28 AM
I generally only flux before casting bullets not when turning scrap into ingots.

highlander 5
January 9, 2013, 11:54 AM
Try any scrap yards in your area they may have wheel weights and linotype on hand.
50/50mix of lino and ww makes a very nice bullet that can be used for both rifle and pistol. If you have any scrap brass you might be able to do a trade for lead/ww/lino as well.

tjcolt45
January 9, 2013, 11:55 AM
Thanks for all the info. I appreciate it. Does anyone cast rifle bullets? Do you change anything when you do?

dragon813gt
January 9, 2013, 12:44 PM
Just go to the CastBollits site. Any question you have has been answered there. There is way more info there then you will get here.

Read this if you have a real interest in casting: http://www.lasc.us/Fryxell_Book_Contents.htm


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Walkalong
January 9, 2013, 02:38 PM
Is it worth it to use flux when melting the lead?I like to flux when making ingots. They come out cleaner and require less fluxing when casting bullets. Sawdust works fine. No need to buy anything.

homatok
January 9, 2013, 04:59 PM
You do not HAVE to flux when doing the initial melting of scrap lead of any kind BUT if you do not you may well throw out useable metal mixed in with the slag from the melt. The best flux is likely sawdust as it will clean unwanted metals from the alloy while reducing any oxidized lead, antimony and tin back into the melt. As suggested, log on to the Cast Boolit site and read to your hearts content. Once you have read at least the "stickys" at the top of each forum, if you still have questions ask the forum and you will get all the help you need!!!

ScratchnDent
January 9, 2013, 05:46 PM
I started casting my own handgun boolits a few years ago, and have come to enjoy that as much as reloading and shooting.

Turning a pile of scrap into a box of shiny new, free boolits always puts a smile on my face!

Wheelweights are getting much harder to find in quantity without paying for them, but if you keep your eyes open, you will find lots of them laying in parking lots and especially in the gutters along busier streets and highways. I have managed to gather about 30 lbs of ingots in the last year or so just from scrounging on the side of the road.

My primary source of lead these days is range scrap. There's LOTS of lead sitting in the berms of most outdoor shooting ranges.

jcwit
January 9, 2013, 07:16 PM
I've been casting since the 1970's. Wheel weights are getting harder to find but I still have a good source for them, they charge me nothing but I always give them some monies in return anyway. My other source for lead is the indoor range I belong to, we clean the trap every 3 to 6 months and one of the perks for those that healp clean the range is taking all the lead they wish. This usually gives me anywhere from 500 lbs to way over 1,000 lbs, all depends how much I wish to load up and take home.

As far as casting for handgun versus rifle, I do both and with the same lead, I have NO problems with leading with either.

Is it cost effective? OOoooohhhhhh ya!

Reefinmike
January 9, 2013, 07:27 PM
I cast using wheel weights. I have a good connection with a local tire shop and they expect me the first sunday of each month to come and collect their junk. I usually get ~ 3-4 gallons worth of weights each month, about 100 pounds worth. this time, over half of that was steel weights and I only came out with about 45 pounds of lead. there are two different types, the clip on and the stick on weights. the clip on are just the right alloy for most pistol bullets, but the stick on ones are really soft, close to pure lead. I usually mix in about 15-20% by weight of the stick on's with regular clip ons. If you value your time to be worth more than $30 an hour, its probably just easier to buy cast bullets. It usually takes an hour and a half to two hours to sort through and clean up wheel weights and cast em into beercan ingots. after that, with six banger molds, I can pretty easily cast 650 158gr 38 bullets or 230 grain 45 bullets

casting chops your reloading costs in atleast half. im down to about $1.45/box of 38 and $1.65/box of 45. as someone who scrounges the range for abandoned casings and nice plastic ammo trays, it now almost seems wasteful just leaving the bullets I shoot in the berm. if the world were perfect, Id step out my back door to my nice range and shoot at my target with a bullet trap behind that way I could recycle and reuse the lead forever. for the time being, I just have to leave it lay in the berm :(

lightman
January 9, 2013, 11:12 PM
I have to agree with most everything said.I do think it is important to flux when smelting your ingots.Wheel weights make great pistol bullets,but I like to use a harder alloy for rifle bullets.Wheel weights can still be found,and still for free or cheap,if you look hard enough.Casting is a fun addition to reloading,and I'm guessing will pay back about like reloading. Lightman

35 Whelen
January 9, 2013, 11:21 PM
Is it worth it to use flux when melting the lead?
Absolutely flux during the initial smelting process. I personally try to process wheelweights in 50-60 lb. batches and after the initial melt when I skim all the steel clips and trash off, I flux alot. This gives me a good even mixture of alloy and that way I essentially have 50 to 60 lbs. of ingots all of which are virtually identical in their alloy composition. This in turn leads more consistent bullets.

I used to cast lots of rifle bullets and use them in High Power competition. The only thing I really changed was the sizing process. The initial lubing and "sizing" of the bullets was performed in an over-sized sizing die in an RCBS lubrisizer. The final sizing was performed in a Lee push through die. Push through dies make a much more concentric bullet. Cast and sized in this manner made for some very, very accurate cast rifle bullets.

35W

James2
January 9, 2013, 11:54 PM
I cast for handguns. Yes I use wheel weights. They are being phased out, don't know how much longer we will be able to get them. I have found them for free at times, but may have to pay. At present my son, who is a mechanic, keeps me supplied for free. You just have to look and see what you can find. Tire shops, mechanics, may have some around.

Cleaning them up has been pretty well covered.

"Is this economically a good thing?", you ask.

For sure it has been for me. I figure the bullets cost only 3 or 4 cents for the energy to melt the lead and the lube. (Not adding in the cost of the tools, and if you get free lead).

As scrap lead gets harder to find we may end up buying lead alloys from suppliers. I suppose we could still save some money doing that.

tjcolt45
January 10, 2013, 12:20 AM
Great information. I went to a few tire dealers today and ended up with three five gallon buckets of wheel weights. Thanks for all the input. I hope others enjoy the replies. I will be looking for bullet molds etc at a gun show this weekend.

James2
January 10, 2013, 01:36 AM
Hey, that's great. Be aware there are zinc wheel weights these days.

Discussion here: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=685180&highlight=zinc+wheel

Nappers
January 10, 2013, 08:58 AM
I buy my lead at a metals shop. I do a fingernail test and gather up all that I can. $.75 a lb and I have about 150lb's saved up for my muzzleloading. Although, that's a lot of lead. I do give some away to those who need it at rendezvous'.

Watch wheel weights for the zinc ones, especially in CA where lead is outlawed (I think). I get my lead in White City Oregon (White City Metals).

I've recovered lead bullets at my local range before, 1/2 hour of work and 20lb's gross of bullets, not a whole lot that were jacketed. I flux it a little before making into ingots after a good washing of the lead and letting it dry for a few days. water and hot lead do not mix well.

rl2013
January 10, 2013, 09:19 AM
I've had good luck with local tire shops. I've shown up with an empty bucket to swap with them for no charge. I like the idea of recovering used bullets.

Nappers
January 10, 2013, 09:27 AM
I like the idea of recovering used bullets.

It's actually kind of fun. I take a container and fillerup!

After a good rain, the bullets stick out like sore thumbs! Easy to pluck.

Here's a video that motivated me. But, make sure they are dry!!!!!! water in a jacket that is trapped is bad news!!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1VnqbyQdxg

35 Whelen
January 10, 2013, 11:11 AM
With regards to zinc, it melts at over 780 F where WW's should melt around 700 give or take. I use my inexpensive digital volt ohmeter and a temperature probe to keep track of temps when I'm smelting. The zinc and steel weights, clips and trah float to the top when the lead melts.

35W

SSN Vet
January 12, 2013, 10:14 PM
Yes
Yes
Yes
Free
Yes

grubbylabs
January 12, 2013, 10:29 PM
I know what you all mean when you say lead is hard to come by, I just went to work for a friend who is taking over his family auto salvage yard. Its tough to weight for the bucket to fill up before I can take it home.:D

Plus we are developing some good relation ships with a few local shops. I hope to soon have more lead than I know what to do with.

blarby
January 12, 2013, 11:01 PM
Does anyone cast their own bullets?

Yes.

Do you use wheel weights?

Occasionally- they are getting hard to find. I can usually get sheet lead and lino ingots cheaper.

Do you have to remove the steel clips?

Not before melting them. They float to the top, pick them off then.

Do you have to pay for these weights or can you find them free?

I've gotten about a coffee cans worth of free lead in my endeavors. Old timers tell folklore about finding vast mountains of it curbside, and "pick as you please" troughs at "service stations" from days of olde. I have yet to find either- and I've looked. I've even tried BeerBribery. But I don't have a Tardis- so I doubt I'll personally ever see it.

Is this economically a good thing? Thanks!

Casting ? You bet your heavy ingots. I laugh all through the process. When I get to that point in a 3k or so bullet run when I can't lift the mould anymore, I think of the faces of all those guys at Bi-Mart at the reloading counter with the long faces over the last two weeks.... looking for bullets that aren't there. Then I Tap the bullets out of the mould, and keep goin'

Is it worth it to use flux when melting the lead?

IF you use alloys, for certain. Sawdust, motor oil- there are a lot of things that are cheap to use.... You are looking for a lot of free carbon, essentially.


Go to thatothersite.com

As you can tell, not really necessary......... I'm fairly certain we can provide just about all the info you need :D

Great information. I went to a few tire dealers today and ended up with three five gallon buckets of wheel weights.

I really need to move........ Congrats ! It just got that much cheaper, now didn't it :D

41 Mag
January 13, 2013, 08:14 AM
Does anyone cast their own bullets? Do you use wheel weights? Do you have to remove the steel clips? Do you have to pay for these weights or can you find them free? Is this economically a good thing? Thanks!

Yes I got started in order to feed the appetite of my Raging Bull. I simply couldn't count on the supply, nor afford to keep shooting commercial bullets. It has sort of morphed from there to include just about every handgun and rifle caliber I own.

I found very little to no local wheel weights. Not that they aren't in my area, but there are plenty of other casters who have already established connections and for the most part have the local supply sowed up. That said, and as mentioned above there are sources to be found in the classifieds of this and other sites. You might have to pay for the alloy but usually it is around $70 per 65# delivered to your door. Figure in the cost of time and fuel to run around all over town trying to find a partial to full bucket of weights, I found it is just as cheap if not cheaper.

The clips, and most other trash, as mentioned will float to the top when the weights melt. They are easily removed especially if you use some sort of strainer type spoon.

As for the fluxing, yep I do so several times during the main smelting into ingots, and again when in my Lee 4-20 when pouring my bullets. I use sawdust twice in the big pot followed by once with paraffin for a final flux before pouring ingots. Then in the 4-20 I only use a pea sized chunk when the alloy comes up to temp and then after each filling of the pot afterwords. It seems to work as I don't get near the dribble or plugged up spout I see others dealing with.

One thing which hasn't been mentioned is when you DO get to the point you have ingots ready to melt into bullets you might also pick up a 1# roll of 95-5 Silver Solder. When you melt up the alloy and before you start to pour bullets you might add in a couple of Oz's to help with fill out in your mold. this will only be necessary if when you pour you find your bullets aren't filling into the sharper corners of the cavities.

As for sources of info, the one site mentioned above is a great source as is the following, The Cast Bullet / Hunting Articles Of Glen E. Fryxell (http://www.lasc.us/ArticlesFryxell.htm). Also be sure to check out the Cast Bullet Notes and From Ingot to Target.

Hope this helps.

Skip Sackett
January 13, 2013, 08:32 AM
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1672.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1674.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1675.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1676.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1678.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1679.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1681.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1685.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1687.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1688.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1692.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/IMG_1693.jpg
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Boolits/45ACP%2045Colt/4546402.jpg

Questions answered via photo journalism! The last there is a 45 Colt load that you will not find on any commercial shelf. THAT is the best part of casting and reloading.

p.s. I have some videos/pictures of doing range scrap from an indoor trap too, if you are interested. :D

blarby
January 13, 2013, 09:38 AM
someone else who makes pizza ingots :D

FROGO207
January 13, 2013, 10:09 AM
I prefer muffin tins myself they are easier to put into the 5 gal buckets to store. Also Thick ones are WW alloy and thin ones are pure lead.:D

wgaynor
January 13, 2013, 11:26 AM
I use both pizza ingots and the "corn" bread ingots. The corn bread ones fit in my furnace easier. The other I have to manipulate to get into the pot.

Of course, if you use a ladle to cast and a cast iron pot, any ingot size will work .

lightman
January 13, 2013, 12:47 PM
Skip,thats a nice looking set-up! My smelting operation is about the same,except that I use several ingot molds that I bought at a gun show for $2 apiece. I have a few cornbread molds,too,but they don't stack as well as the 1# ingots. Lightman

Skip Sackett
January 13, 2013, 01:53 PM
Thanks ALL!
I like to reload and cast almost as much as I like to shoot! :)

Here is another setup I have for smelting. This one is from an indoor range bullet trap. LOTS of jacketed stuff in this mess!
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/107lb.jpg

Video, click on it to watch:
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/th_First_load_heating.jpg (http://s142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/?action=view&current=First_load_heating.mp4)
Video, click on it to watch:
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/th_Second_load_heating.jpg (http://s142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/?action=view&current=Second_load_heating.mp4)
Video, click on it to watch:
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/th_Second_load_heating_2.jpg (http://s142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/?action=view&current=Second_load_heating_2.mp4)
The "pie" ingots were from my #1 son's setup. These are from mine:
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/60lbs_3pm.jpg

Culls are not pulled from this pile yet but, this is WHY I cast:
http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r115/Sackettwannabe/Casting/Range%20Lead/452200RangeScrap.jpg

:D

10 Spot Terminator
January 13, 2013, 02:29 PM
Surprisingly nobody mentioned to the newbie OP the basic difference of the stick on vs. clip on wheel weights. The stick ons which look like thick metal tape are near pure soft lead and should be kept seperate from the harder clip on weights. Be sure to sort these too as will have lettering on them and sort the ones that say zn ( zinc ) or fe ( steel ). Scrap the steel ones but hang onto the zinc as can be used for fishing sinkers, downrigger weights, anchors or anything heavy except bullets. Same goes for the zinc clip ons as can keep them too. I try to pre sort my buckets of weights when I get them now as only appx. 50% is useable lead anymore and dont want to run the risk of contaminating what little yield I am getting.

Hillbillyz
January 13, 2013, 07:38 PM
I've had very little sucess with getting free wheel weights. What I do is go to the local recycle yard, they sell wheel weights for .55 a pound. He has a 55 gallon drum of them and I fill a 3 gallon bucket of the ones I pick out. That way I have very few steel or zinkers.

Even when you figure waste from the clips a pond of smelted wheel weight lead costs @ .60. Still beats having to buy bullets.

dragon813gt
January 13, 2013, 08:40 PM
Since we're showing pictures :)
http://i198.photobucket.com/albums/aa39/dragon813gt/Firearms/Reloading/EB9A1060-24E4-4283-8B9D-B66761DB7C1F-23892-00000D4B9EBD9C5C.jpg

20 degree ambient temp leads to this after a long session
http://i198.photobucket.com/albums/aa39/dragon813gt/Firearms/Reloading/5928177D-052B-40DD-9E2A-6D1024D757C9-23892-00000D4BA91548D7.jpg

Some of the finished product
http://i198.photobucket.com/albums/aa39/dragon813gt/Firearms/Reloading/F9FB0FE7-7815-4B9A-AEE5-490A95189832-4518-000001D9B2D2DC85.jpg


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41 Mag
January 14, 2013, 06:55 AM
Hey Skip, that bullet looks awefully familiar, is that from the MP mold?

If so look over at my Photobook album under shooting/ Casting/ Alloy testing. I did some 45 ACP test with it that really surprised me.

USSR
January 14, 2013, 08:32 AM
Hey Skip, that bullet looks awefully familiar, is that from the MP mold?

If so look over at my Photobook album under shooting/ Casting/ Alloy testing. I did some 45 ACP test with it that really surprised me.


Not Skip, but Yep, that's from the MP .452-200 mould. I just lubed and sized a couple hundred of them yesterday. Great bullet.

Don

SSN Vet
January 14, 2013, 11:16 AM
I purchased a 50# roll of roofers lead flashing for $1 a pound when we built our addition, but then the contractor showed up with one that he bought.

I made sure he used his and mine became an "off the books" reloading expense ;)

I'm mixing it in with my WWs at about 25% pure to 75% WWs when I smelt and pour ingots. Then when I cast boolets, I add ~ 12 inches of 98 tin - 2 antimony solder to a 2/3 full Lee 20# production pot.

As you can see, I'm very scientific about it.

grubbylabs
January 14, 2013, 12:04 PM
You people ought to be ashamed of your selves ruining good cast iron like that.

I just could not bring my self to use good cooking cast iron for any thing but cooking.

41 Mag
January 14, 2013, 06:24 PM
USSR,
I have the heavier one that throws around a 260'ish grain one depending on the alloy. It sure does make a nice wide flat spot in the soft dirt I use to catch them.

This is the pic comparing the ACP's,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Shooting/Cast%20Boolit%20Loading%20and%20Shooting/Alloy%20Testing/P1010018_zps7ed53667.jpg

And the same, 9far right) from my 45 Colt @ 50yds,
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f285/41nag/Shooting/Cast%20Boolit%20Loading%20and%20Shooting/P1010011.jpg

Gotta love those MP's they throw great bullets for sure.

grubbylabs,

I hear you on the cast iron, I have my cookin wear and now a couple of pieces of castin wear. I purchased the latter specifically for smelting. The other stuff is cared for like a good old huntin dog, very tenderly.

I have one of my grandmother's 10" skillets, that "was" used for who knows how many years. I came home from work one evening and my wife then pretty young and and new to all things cooking then, said "Look honey I cleaned up this old skillet today, and it almost looks new again!" Yea I kept her, probably the best thing I ever did, but she did learn that the old black baked on gunk is good on cast iron, and not so good on the other stuff. LOL

USSR
January 14, 2013, 06:45 PM
260gr bullet out of a .45 ACP? What do the travel at, 600fps?:D I have the MP .454-270SAA for my .45 Colt. With my alloy the hollowpoints come out at about 265gr. Yeah, gotta love those MP moulds.

Don

Skip Sackett
January 14, 2013, 08:22 PM
Hey Skip, that bullet looks awefully familiar, is that from the MP mold?

If so look over at my Photobook album under shooting/ Casting/ Alloy testing. I did some 45 ACP test with it that really surprised me

Yes, 41, that is from one of those moulds! I have several including a 454640 that I was the Honcho for on castboolits.gunloads.com!

Oh, and by the way, I have a load for that bullet that pushes it out of my M625JM 4" revolver @ 1100fps! How is THAT for 45ACP performance, Don?

;)

mcdonl
January 14, 2013, 08:25 PM
Hey.... I started a thread and have not finished but I left off going from WW to ingots. Next step is casting Rn230's so it will answer some of your questions...

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=690623


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USSR
January 14, 2013, 08:28 PM
Yeah, that's performance, but I don't think you will get anything like that out of a 1911.

Don

boommer
January 14, 2013, 08:36 PM
USSR HI I run some heavy loads thru my 1911 springfield 9grs of unique 255 gr CAST RF and 22# recoil spring and show no pressure signs. 875 fps over a crony.
I DON'T RECOMMEND THIS LOAD but I read a article on this and worked up to this load and its do- able. I don't use this load that much but it's possible and I might ad this is with new cases.

Skip Sackett
January 14, 2013, 09:34 PM
USSR,
Check this out:

http://www.clarkcustomguns.com/rowland.htm

Even more than what I get from my M625JM! And, from a 1911!

USSR
January 14, 2013, 10:28 PM
Eh, I don't think so. That's what they make S&W N Frames for.:)

Don

Fryerpower
January 14, 2013, 10:50 PM
No one has mentioned using old automotive batteries. Is it a bad idea?
I realize that by the time they are "old & dead" they are sulfated up and the lead sulfate has usually bridged across a couple of plates. Are they usable?

-Jim

dragon813gt
January 14, 2013, 10:52 PM
If you want to die go ahead and melt down battery plates. They are not something you want to mess around with.

Read this: http://www.lasc.us/CastBulletAlloy.htm


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Fryerpower
January 14, 2013, 11:18 PM
Yep, just found lots of advice about NOT using batteries while searching our site.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=411764&page=2&highlight=battery+lead

Thanks for the additional link though.

Jim

41 Mag
January 15, 2013, 06:04 AM
This is part of the fun of casting up your own bullets. The part of having a mold that while may have been designed to work for one particular purpose initially, can be used in others within reason with not a lot of fuss. Playing with alloys to get something your wanting to get from the bullet, or simply to be able to shoot a LOT more with less expense than if you had to purchase manufactured bullets.

Take the Lee TL452-230, it can be used in the 1911, not only as cast in most cases but with some careful loading and fiddling around in just about any .452 caliber rifle or pistol for gallery type loads or even some flame throwing type depending on the alloy used. It's all about having fun and using your own creation to accomplish a means to an end. And that is just one mold out of who knows how many are out there in the different calibers.

260gr bullet out of a .45 ACP? What do the travel at, 600fps? I have the MP .454-270SAA for my .45 Colt. With my alloy the hollowpoints come out at about 265gr. Yeah, gotta love those MP moulds.

Don

I don't know what the speed is on them I haven't chronied them. I was just sitting here one rainy day and got to thinking how or IF they would eve run through my 1911. Figured sine I needed to shoot a few loads through it anyway I would just give it a try up against some of the other loads I had. I doubt I will make a habit of shooting them even though they are pretty mild mannered. (relatively speaking) I do however think that they would definitely give an unwanted guest in the house a reason to rethink his position though.

Yes, 41, that is from one of those moulds! I have several including a 454640 that I was the Honcho for on castboolits.gunloads.com!

Oh, and by the way, I have a load for that bullet that pushes it out of my M625JM 4" revolver @ 1100fps! How is THAT for 45ACP performance, Don?


Yep they are great molds and the one above is REALLY something out of my 7.5" Redhawk in 45 Colt. I have worked hard to find a hog that would help me test them out, but they somehow seem to have gotten the message already and have been staying out of sight or range. Time is on my side though I am VERY patient......

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