Tough double-action .357?


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Buck13
January 10, 2013, 03:36 PM
I'm thinking of getting a DA .357, 6" barrel or longer. I would probably shoot mostly typical major-brand factory loads (158 gr. 12XX fps) or equivalent hand-loads, but also some (meaning a box or two per year) top-shelf stuff: not crazy Internet-only levels, but full-on "official" published load data or Buffalo Bore (BTW, is Buffalo Bore thought to be off-the-books level, or very high but published?).

What model DA revolvers would you expect to hold up well to a little abuse? Either new production, or fairly common on the used market. Factory-drilled for scope mounts a plus, but not a solid requirement.

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jp9mm
January 10, 2013, 03:48 PM
Gp100 or 686.

Guillermo
January 10, 2013, 03:57 PM
Gp100 or pre-1997 686

Alec
January 10, 2013, 03:58 PM
What happened after 1998?

Guillermo
January 10, 2013, 04:03 PM
I erred and edited

In 1997 they went to MIM triggers

Iggy
January 10, 2013, 04:18 PM
L or N frame S&Ws.

jmr40
January 10, 2013, 04:18 PM
You'll get more responses for GP-100 I bet. But my choice is an N frame Smith, my 28 to be specific. They are actually lighter than the GP-100 or 686 and as tough as they come.

Buck13
January 10, 2013, 04:23 PM
L or N frame S&Ws.
Unfortunately, I let my dad sell off one of each 5 or 6 years ago...

BigJimP
January 10, 2013, 04:31 PM
I think you'll be best off with a S&W ( L frame is the 686 model ) ...or the bigger N frame ( model 27 or 28 ).....personally, my model 27's in 4" and 6" are the guns I shoot the most ..at least in double action.

I also have a Freedom Arms...single action, 5 shot, large frame, 4 3/4" octaganol barrel made in .357 mag that I shoot a lot...

I shoot almost exclusively 158gr JHP's ( all reloads...) but the L or N frames will eat anything you can possibly throw at them...especially the N frames.

9mmepiphany
January 10, 2013, 04:34 PM
I personally like the S&W M-627, but it is mostly because of how the action feels.

If your tough requirement is paramount, I'd look into the Ruger Super Redhawk...it comes with rings for mounting a scope

http://www.ukshooting.com/images/SRH357-3.jpg

...did you ask about a long barrel?

http://www.ukshooting.com/images/SRH357-1.jpg

Todd93843
January 10, 2013, 04:56 PM
...did you ask about a long barrel?

http://www.ukshooting.com/images/SRH357-1.jpg

holy cow! LOL isn't that thing more of a rifle than a revolver???

WoodchuckAssassin
January 10, 2013, 05:05 PM
The Ruger 100's and S&W 686's have it!

I've never owned/shot a GP100, but I trust Ruger to build all their guns to last 10,000 years. I DO own and shoot a 686 no-dash (circa 1983), and if you can find a used one, you'll be very happy. They're strong as hell, and have a nice, crisp trigger - breaking at 3 pounds. Besides the S&W trigger being a little better, either will make you happy.

beag_nut
January 10, 2013, 05:11 PM
I have a GP100, 6" barrel. Shooting "mild" mags through it feels like a .22. Full-blown max .357 mag loads are tame. Its accuracy is phenomenal. And unlike a Smith, it has no sideplates to ever loosen.
By the way, when did a Redhawk ever come in .357?
And, I wish the GP's had those integral sight mount positions, also.

joeschmoe
January 10, 2013, 05:14 PM
holy cow! LOL isn't that thing more of a rifle than a revolver???
Fugly! It's a .44mag snubby with a long barrel stuffed inside.

GP100 is my vote.

weisse52
January 10, 2013, 08:23 PM
Model 28 S&W N frame revolverws are fairly common and will take most any sane load. A 686/586 would be good 2nd (maybe 1st) choice.
A Ruger GP100 is a great revolver. I just like the feel of the Smith trigger better. Now, if I could ONLY buy a Ruger, I would still be happy.

rswartsell
January 10, 2013, 08:40 PM
Colt Trooper Mk III or Mk V (King Cobra). Regardless of internet hype, none stronger or more durable. Use snap caps for dry firing though. Dan Wesson is definitely another option.

skidder
January 10, 2013, 09:21 PM
I really like the Security Six. Strong as heck, and it comes in a k-frame size.


http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Security%20Six/SixFence5.jpg

Backpacker33
January 10, 2013, 10:09 PM
Can't argue with any of the suggestions posted here. I've had a number of them. I like the S&W 686 and a 28 I still have. But when I got a Colt King Cobra I found my heaven. For a long barreled revolver with heavy-bullet hunting or dangerous animal loads, it's my first choice. Usually. Unless I just want to carry one of the others . . ..

BCCL
January 10, 2013, 10:18 PM
I love "N" frame .357 S&W's. Full bore snort-n-stomp magnums feel like .38 specials in them to me. :)

jp9mm
January 10, 2013, 11:08 PM
How could i forget about the security six/ speed six.
I just picked up a security six. Stock trigger is nicer than my gp-100.. Untill i changed springs and stoned trigger parts. The main spring rod especially needed a lot of smoothing with a dremel to get rid of grittyness in the da pull.

I believe the gp100 does have a stronger cylinder lock design.

slick6
January 11, 2013, 12:38 AM
I have a GP100, 6" barrel. Shooting "mild" mags through it feels like a .22. Full-blown max .357 mag loads are tame. Its accuracy is phenomenal. And unlike a Smith, it has no sideplates to ever loosen.
By the way, when did a Redhawk ever come in .357?
And, I wish the GP's had those integral sight mount positions, also.
From the known serial numbers produced, the Redhawk .357 had a short production run. These were produced between 1981 and 1983 and, it is estimated that only 5,000 of each barrel length were made(5-1/2" and 7-1/2"). Following is a picture of my NIB 5-1/2" Redhawk .357(Model KRH-355):
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v631/shootit/P1020230.jpg

Fishslayer
January 13, 2013, 07:49 PM
"My. That's a big one!" :D



...did you ask about a long barrel?

http://www.ukshooting.com/images/SRH357-1.jpg

easyg
January 13, 2013, 11:22 PM
Yep, Ruger GP100


http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n165/allenXdog/HPIM7181.jpg

Jaymo
January 14, 2013, 12:37 AM
GP100s are very tough.

BP44
January 14, 2013, 04:02 AM
Another vote for a N frame, I do like the looks of those redhawks though

Remllez
January 14, 2013, 11:15 AM
For snorts and giggles have a look at a Dan Wesson (15) series. They are every bit as tough as a Smith or Ruger. They are very well built, strong and have many features still not found on more recent offerings from other companies.

Good luck and have fun looking for a new blaster!

BCRider
January 14, 2013, 12:34 PM
The big N frame model 27 or 28 would be my suggestion as well if you like the look of a blued steel over silvery stainless.

Hey, the N frame is "good enough" to be chambered for .44Mag. So you KNOW it's beefy enough to deal with anything you can dish out with SAMMI compliant .357Mag loads.

targetshooter22
January 14, 2013, 01:16 PM
+1 GP100. I really like mine, and the 357 mag recoil with max published data for 158 grain bullets is quite mild. Loud, but not hard on the hands. Accuracy is good too. I'm told, and can easily believe, the S&W double action trigger is smoother; with the GP100, you will feel some internal clicks as you fire. But for toughness, I think they are second to none, at least for a "production" gun as opposed to custom.

Driftwood Johnson
January 14, 2013, 01:26 PM
Howdy

Nothing beats a S&W Model 28 in my book.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/Model28_02-1.jpg



Or the original 357 Magnum, the Model 27. But they tend to be a bit pricey.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v495/Driftwood_Johnson/smith%20and%20wesson/Model%2027/IMG_0191_enhanced.jpg

codefour
January 15, 2013, 12:07 PM
This last summer, I purchased a new Performance Center 627. It's the N-frame 8 shot. That weapon could not hit the broadside of a barn. The barrel actually looked crooked to the naked eye. It was shooting three feet left at 25 yards!

It went back to S&W. the barrel was not bent but the frame was crooked. I do not hear any of these stories regarding Ruger on recent production. If uou have to go new, I would recommend a Ruger GP100. I wish I bought one originally.

9mmepiphany
January 15, 2013, 12:40 PM
This last summer, I purchased a new Performance Center 627. It's the N-frame 8 shot.
... If uou have to go new, I would recommend a Ruger GP100. I wish I bought one originally.
The S&W M-627s can be very nice too

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n79/9mmepiphany/Orans%20Pistols/LewsPistols037.jpg

foghornl
January 15, 2013, 01:56 PM
9MMepiphany:

You don't need any ammo with that long-barrel for hunting....just lean down out of the tree-stand a bit and whomp Bambi upside the head.... :D :neener:

9mmepiphany
January 15, 2013, 02:56 PM
9MMepiphany:

You don't need any ammo with that long-barrel for hunting....just lean down out of the tree-stand a bit and whomp Bambi upside the head.... :D :neener:
Maybe, but I think you'd need a Dan Wesson with a 15" barrel for that:

http://www.danwessonforum.com/wp-content/gallery/15a.jpg

They were built for Silhouette shooting

billybob44
January 16, 2013, 10:49 AM
Yep, Ruger GP100


http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n165/allenXdog/HPIM7181.jpg
NOT to down your GP, but would you consider that to be an excessive "Turn Line"?

Thanks..Bill.

Drail
January 16, 2013, 11:07 AM
People who worry about "turn lines" are, for the most part, collectors who don't shoot all that much. It doesn't do any harm. It's like worrying about how clean and shiny the frame is on your car. Life is too short. Personally, that turn line looks very good. I like to know that the bolt is definitely going to find and enter the locking notch on the cylinder as designed. Intentionally timing a revolver so that the bolt doesn't rise until the last possible second is a downgrade IMO. I have never understood the logic of "safe queen" guns. I would much rather invest in gold or silver or platinum and shoot all of my guns. That is a beautiful Ruger GP. GPs are VERY tough but not indestructible. Feed it 110/125 gr. maximum loads and you can burn out or crack the forcing cone in fairly short order. I didn't believe this until I trashed my GP. The forcing cone looks as if someone took an oxy-acetylene cutting torch to it. If you really want to see how much abuse a Ruger DA revolver can take read Kuhnhausen's Ruger DA Shop Manual. It is truly frightening what some of his cutomers subjected their Ruger revolvers to (and destroyed them) Everything made by man has limits. The most startling photos in his book shows a Ruger DA barrel that was filled from one end to the other with 5 bullets jammed into a squib. He sawed it in half lengthwise to show all of the bullets. The barrel did not blow. Pretty tough stuff.

9mmepiphany
January 16, 2013, 01:24 PM
NOT to down your GP, but would you consider that to be an excessive "Turn Line"?

Thanks..Bill.
I wouldn't consider it excessive.

I have a Python than has a more pronounced turn line (actually it is the drag line from the bolt) than that one. But then, it served as my duty gun and then as my PPC gun

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n79/9mmepiphany/Orans%20Pistols/LewsPistols032.jpg

Jim K
January 16, 2013, 02:21 PM
I like Rugers, and they are good guns. But I am sure the Ruger fans would have a collective heart attack if they ever find out that Ruger cylinders are

(Shock! Horror! :eek: )

made from the same steel composition bar stock, and often bought from the same supplier, as S&W cylinders.

And whatinheck does using MIM parts have to do with strength and ruggedness? The only recent S&W hammers I ever saw that failed were 1970 vintage, and not MIM.

Jim

rswartsell
January 16, 2013, 05:16 PM
Like Rugers too, and the lack of a side plate in the design did some good to add to inherent strength. That slab like beefy frame though is cast. Cast very well mind you but not as strong as an identical forged one. The strength crown worn by the GP-100 is an "internetism", experts have said the Colt MkIII is likely the true heir to that throne.

This being said, the GP-100 is still plenty strong.

Drail
January 16, 2013, 06:44 PM
Actually, some independent testing labs have run severe testing (to destruction) on Colt, S&W and Ruger DA revolvers and the Ruger was the strongest. They threaded to muzzle of each to recieve a plug and fired heavy loads into the plugged barrel until it blew. The Colt and S&W blew after 2 or 3 rounds. The Ruger was fired until the barrel was completely filled with bullets and it never blew. Kuhnhausen talks about this test in his book. While Ruger's investment casting process is probably the best in the industry (they also make aerospace parts) what really makes a difference is the extensive Xray and Zyglow testing they do on every part. They "might" produce a defective casting with a void in it but it will never make it out of inspection or go into a gun. It will be remelted and used for the next batch. Chances are the landing gear on the last airliner you flew on used investment castings for the landing gear structural parts. Parts of the space shuttle use castings from Ruger's Pine Tree Castings foundry. If someone tells you a forged frame is stronger than an investment cast one just smile and say "Sure".

roaddog28
January 16, 2013, 07:10 PM
Like Drail posted. One can wear out a Ruger GP100 buy shooting to many 125 gr "flame throwers". These will erode and crack forcing cones and flame cut the throat of any revolver if a person shoots too many.
Here is a example:
100 hundred rounds a week for a year. Hornady XTP over 22 gr. of H110 with a Remington 5 1/2 primer.
http://i656.photobucket.com/albums/uu283/HPitt74985/GP100HornadyXTPover22grofH110withaRemington512primer.jpg

DLrocket89
January 16, 2013, 07:57 PM
+1 for not caring about MIM parts. For what it's worth, I'm a materials engineer (modern day metallurgical engineer) and have spent time working in aerospace. I can say that MIM, just like any other manufacturing process out there, is just as good or just as bad as the person/company doing the process. My dad has two artificial hips. The inserts that go into his femur? MIM. He was 42 years old when he got them, he's a bit over 50 now and still going strong. So are his hips.

Drail
January 17, 2013, 10:54 AM
Roaddog, I trashed my forcing cone (GP100) just like that in only about 4 to 5 months of shooting 125 gr. flame thrower max. loads. I will never ever shoot light weight high velocity ammo again in any brand of revolver. I wish that so many people would stop repeating the "mantra" that Ruger revolvers are indestructible and you'll never wear one out.

ColtPythonElite
January 17, 2013, 11:07 AM
A famous gunsmith once said the King Cobra was the strongest mid-framed revolver made...My favorite one has going on 30k stout rounds thru it and is still tight....FWIW, I mostly shoot 125gr JHPs.

SDGlock23
January 17, 2013, 11:13 AM
If you want tough, you want a GP100. I had one, sold it only because I condensed calibers. It was the 6" stainless version and it would shoot a 158gr Missouri SWC overtop 14.8gr of Alliant 2400 @ 1.600" an average of 1535 fps with single digit extreme spreads.

bannockburn
January 17, 2013, 11:19 AM
1) Ruger Security Six or GP 100
2) S&W L frame or N frame
3) Colt Trooper Mk.III or Mk.V

easyg
January 17, 2013, 01:04 PM
NOT to down your GP, but would you consider that to be an excessive "Turn Line"?
Nope.
Heck, she aint even broken in good yet. :)

Metal on coated metal is going to leave a mark or trail, that's just the nature of things.
But it's just cosmetic.

VancMike
January 17, 2013, 05:00 PM
I like S&W, so my .357 Mags are a 20-year old 586 and a Mdl 27-1. But I let a guy talk me out of a SS Security Six that I carried and shot for years. So I like them both. Had to do more tinkering on the Ruger's trigger to get it where I wanted it, but that seems to be the case on most Rugers I've owned.

The long barreled revolvers do look awkward, but some, surprisingly, are not. I once owned a very accurate S&W Mdl 25-5 with an almost-9" barrel. I'm a short guy, so figured I could always use it as a temporary crutch, if I had to......

roaddog28
January 17, 2013, 08:12 PM
Roaddog, I trashed my forcing cone (GP100) just like that in only about 4 to 5 months of shooting 125 gr. flame thrower max. loads. I will never ever shoot light weight high velocity ammo again in any brand of revolver. I wish that so many people would stop repeating the "mantra" that Ruger revolvers are indestructible and you'll never wear one out.
Hopefully people will learn. No revolver is strong enough to take the beating of the 125 or lighter high velocity frame throwers. They pound any revolver and can result in a barrel replacement. I never will shoot these again.
Good luck and happy shooting Drail.
Howard

EmGeeGeorge
January 17, 2013, 08:23 PM
Gp100...

EVIL
January 18, 2013, 10:35 AM
If you want tough, you want a GP100. I had one, sold it only because I condensed calibers. It was the 6" stainless version and it would shoot a 158gr Missouri SWC overtop 14.8gr of Alliant 2400 @ 1.600" an average of 1535 fps with single digit extreme spreads.
That's almost my exact load! I shoot a Missouri Bullet company 158 grain SWC over 14.0 grains of Alliant 2400, out of my 6" S&W 586 "no dash" which is a stout enough load for me. After 50 rounds of this load my hand hurts where the backstrap contacts the palm. 15.3 Grains is the max listed - which is pretty hot IMHO.

Really, I think It would be hard to go wrong with either an L-Frame S&W or a Ruger GP-100. They are both excellent revolvers. I would probably just go with the best deal I could find first locally.

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