Faux ivory grips for 1861 Navy pietta


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Mictlanero
January 10, 2013, 05:55 PM
I want an alternate set of ivory looking grips for 1861 Pietta navy - not sure which company make them that fit this pistol -

Does anyone have any experience with this or know what size fits this pistol?

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Big Al Mass
January 10, 2013, 06:17 PM
You could try these: http://www.gungrip.com/detail_C37__7__COLT%201851%20Grips.html They are the only ones I have come across. They are for the 1851 Navy, but they could also fit the '61 as well.

dagger dog
January 10, 2013, 09:13 PM
Try Larry at www.gripmaker.com, they have a bunch of grips for the Navy!

Noz
January 11, 2013, 01:52 PM
Fingers McGee has a set of grips for his 61s made from American Holly. It is a white wood that is aging like ivory. Look good!!!

Fingers McGee
January 12, 2013, 12:44 AM
Fingers McGee has a set of grips for his 61s made from American Holly. It is a white wood that is aging like ivory. Look good!!!

You mean like this one?

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c86/fingersmcgee/DSCN1395.jpg

Mictlanero
January 12, 2013, 03:12 PM
Thanks!

Wow, that American Holly is indeed very nice looking

Jaymo
January 12, 2013, 03:55 PM
That's why I bought American Holly grips for my Blackhawk. It looks a lot like ivory and it ages a lot like ivory. Much more so, than resin fake ivory.

the Black Spot
January 12, 2013, 06:01 PM
U can make your own ivories by buying rustoleum brand appliance epoxy spray paint. Just spray grips and let cure. Cost about $6

robert garner
January 12, 2013, 11:17 PM
Fingers McGee,
Those are the best looking grips I've seen that weren't Ivory.
Djoomakum or buyum?
Are you intending to varnish them when they are properly aged,or is it necessary?
robert

Fingers McGee
January 13, 2013, 01:12 AM
Those are the best looking grips I've seen that weren't Ivory.
Djoomakum or buyum?
Are you intending to varnish them when they are properly aged,or is it necessary?

Had them made by Doc Shapiro about 6 years ago. Not sure what he used on them; but I think it was just an oil finish. Only maintenance they've had in 6 years of use is to wipe them down with a cloth with some Balistol sprayed on it.

kBob
January 13, 2013, 09:30 AM
ARRGH. Went on line to look for a chunk of American Holly big enough to make agrip panel from. That stuff ain't cheap AND some folks are selling the outer wood as though it were the desirable heart wood. Only decent batch I found was a buch of scrap that had streaks and knots in it.

Did a search for some plastic Faux Ivory for an 1858 Pietta Remmie on GunBroker and found both smooth and sheckered plastic for about $50 shipped.....and real elepahnt ivory smooth for a mere $600.

It occurs to me that a church brother that sometimes makes it in runs an exotic wood business (mainly they recover wood "lost" in the late 1800s in rivers in the sough east) and he might be a source for American Holly.

The fact that I had this thought indicates part of my brain is encouraging me to stop typing and get ready for church so ..

Veeder-bye-bye!

-kBob

mykeal
January 13, 2013, 11:21 AM
American Holly is very difficult to find in a size large enough to produce clean revolver scales. I had a set made for a Single Six that cost me $100 and took almost 6 months. And the guy who made them said not to call him; he'd call me if he ever had any more.

Finish them with Tru-Oil to get the aged ivory look.

tpelle
January 14, 2013, 08:56 PM
I ran across a place on the internet that offers grips for 1911s made from Mammoth Ivory! They're a little pricey, but at least they're not from an endangered species. :D

Noz
January 15, 2013, 06:38 PM
Around here everybody knows that if Fingers has a wreck the first things that are saved are his holsters and the Holly gripped 1861s. Then you look to see about the condition of the people.
Show the holsters, Fingers.

Fingers McGee
January 15, 2013, 08:47 PM
Ya mean these?

http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c86/fingersmcgee/100_1282.jpg

Mictlanero
January 15, 2013, 08:53 PM
wow, that holly is nice - nice rig also, Fingers McGee

I am thinking i may get the Grip Maker fake ivory ones for now - i kind of like the Mexican Eagle design

Noz
January 16, 2013, 11:09 AM
Yup. Those are the ones.

gosh, they's pretty!

and they are are wearing Slix nipples and a light main spring.

Fingers McGee
January 16, 2013, 01:34 PM
and they are are wearing Slix nipples and a light main spring.

Not these pistols. This picture is of my 2nd Gen '51 Navies with the rig. Only picture I have of it. The '51s were the first set of pistols that I put Holly grips on.

jgh4445
January 16, 2013, 04:11 PM
I happen to know where a couple of Holley trees are that were bulldozed last week when clearing some land. Pretty big trunks, I'd say about 10 to 12 inch diameters. How long would it take for this stuff to dry so grips could be made? I might be able to get a hold of a piece if I spoke to the landowner about it. Far as I know, they are going into the wind row to be burned.

Fingers McGee
January 16, 2013, 06:34 PM
I have no idea how long it takes to dry. I'd get all I can and see who wants it. I'd take a hunk.

Here's some for sale on Evilbay

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=holly+lumber

mdauben
January 18, 2013, 02:08 PM
I don't think anyone has mentioned Tru Ivory (http://www.truivory.com/default.htm) yet? They produce an artificial ivory for gun grips that has a "grain" to it like natural ivory, and is available in several levels of yellowing/aging.

http://www.truivory.com/images/01_xtralarge.jpg

I was planning on getting a set of these for my 1851 Navy revolvers.

Olmontanaboy
January 28, 2013, 10:27 AM
I have the Tru-Ivory on my Navy:

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/filekeeper/z1011.jpg

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e367/filekeeper/z1002-1.jpg

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