House Gun Opinion?


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fxstchewy
January 11, 2013, 05:54 PM
1911 with 5" barrel 7-8rds capacity or GP100 4"er 6rd capacity, which would you prefer and why?

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psyopspec
January 11, 2013, 06:02 PM
The 1911. I'm just not a revolver guy. Were I a revolver guy, the GP100. Either would serve well if the user did their part.

Skribs
January 11, 2013, 06:08 PM
I'm not a revolver guy, but I'll take a revolver over a 1911. I feel a single-stack full-size pistol wastes real estate. I like detachable magazines, but most often your house gun is going to be grabbed with what is in it, so you're really only talking about one round. The advantage is you don't have to remember if the chamber is loaded or hit the safety, you can just grab it and fire.

Now, if I were not limitted, I would say at the very least a double-stack 1911, if not another double-stack pistol would be better, and for a house gun I'd prefer a long gun. The recent story of a woman shooting a man 5 times in the face with a .38 special has led me to think that maybe 6 isn't enough even for one attacker (and that was with 83% hit rate).

pendennis
January 11, 2013, 06:12 PM
I prefer the 1911 to the revolver. No knock on the revolver (I periodically carry a Model 65 S&W, 3" barrel).

In the dark, a reload is "hands find hands" for the semi-auto, and I need speed loaders for the wheel gun (if you need a reload).

The 1911 is single action all the time. Less trigger pressure.

Nicky Santoro
January 11, 2013, 06:16 PM
FWIW, I voted for the GP100. That being said, when I bought a house gun over 30 years ago my only experience with handguns was with the 1911 from the Army so I got one. It still serves as my house gun, but if I were to make a new purchase today it would be a 4" .357.

Swing
January 11, 2013, 06:24 PM
Both are solid. I'd take the 1911, personally.

Teachu2
January 11, 2013, 06:24 PM
Given no other parameters and choices, the revolver is easier to use reliably - point and pull the trigger.

That said, both are good choices but there are better choices. Whatever you choose, practice with it often.

Spammy_H
January 11, 2013, 06:42 PM
1911. Less risk of over penetration and easier on the ears indoors.

tuj
January 11, 2013, 07:37 PM
1911 - those few extra rounds plus the ease of reloading might just make the difference.

LeonCarr
January 11, 2013, 07:50 PM
GP-100, cuz I don't like 1911s :).

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

beatledog7
January 11, 2013, 08:02 PM
The GP because it's a .357MAG. I've no beef with .45ACP or 1911s; I just prefer the .357MAG as a stopper.

American Finn
January 11, 2013, 08:03 PM
I voted for the GP-100 as well.

I lean towards the revolver for a house gun for the simple fact that you can leave it loaded forever without worrying about spring compression in a magazine. When I pull out my house gun, I want it to go "bang" and not "click" because the mag spring is weak and worn out. Now, I am not an expert on spring compression, but my experience in industrial settings tells me it is possible over time. My house gun is a Ruger Blackhawk in .45LC.

I routinely carry a 1911 as my CPL gun (mainly winter), a Sig P250 Subcompact 9mm in warmer weather, and a Ruger LCP. With my carry guns, however, I don't leave the magazines loaded for more than a week without unloading them and giving them a "break". If this is overkill, and I am being over concerned about this, please advise.

Vern Humphrey
January 11, 2013, 08:26 PM
Neither. A handgun is for when you have to have a gun with you as you go about your business -- you compromise on power to get portability and concealability.

You don't have to make that compromise in your home. Get a pump shotgun.

Sergei Mosin
January 11, 2013, 08:34 PM
American Finn, what wears out a spring is use - repeated compression and relaxation. A magazine loaded once could sit for decades and work just fine - and there are plenty of magazines that have done just that.

To the original question, I can't vote for one or the other, because both of these weapons are included in our home defense plan. Either is a fine choice.

USAF_Vet
January 11, 2013, 09:16 PM
I'd be fine with either. But, i don't foresee keeping the 1911 cocked and locked, so I give the nod to the Double action revolver over the Single action pistol.

rcmodel
January 11, 2013, 09:42 PM
I'm a died in the wool 1911 guy starting in 1962.

But for a house gun you intend to leave laying around loaded.
One you or your wife might have to grab up and use in a moment of panic?
And safely clear after you shot someone with it while waiting for the cops to get there!

You just can't do better then a revolver.

It's either loaded, or it isn't.

You or your wife are very unlikely to have an ND and get yourself shot by a cop while clearing it in a moment of panic.
And forgeting there is still one in the chamber after you drop the mag.

rc

CTGunner
January 11, 2013, 09:58 PM
I voted for reliability. In this instance that's the gp.

MedWheeler
January 12, 2013, 12:17 AM
Depends on who might be called upon to use it, among other things. My house? I was combat-trained in the double-action revolver far more than the semi-automatic, and never in the single-action semi-automatic. The GP-100 wins the assignment.

That's not to say I cannot press a 1911 into service easily; I know I could, though it would be better to be an ambidextrous model as I am left-handed. But, for my wife to also have the firearm as an option, it would have to be the revolver. There is no requirement that, just because the revolver is chambered for the .357Magnum round, it has to be loaded with it. There are more than enough fine performers in .38 Special.

horsemen61
January 12, 2013, 12:28 AM
More rounds with the 1911

U-235
January 12, 2013, 01:04 AM
Wow, tied at 24 to 24 when I voted. I chose the 1911 by the way.

PlayTheAces
January 12, 2013, 04:06 AM
I own both a GP-100 and a Series 70.

And I generally use a S&W 19 as my house gun. :eek:

ArchAngelCD
January 12, 2013, 04:10 AM
Both are fine HD handguns. If you always carry a 1911 and are used to swiping off the safety without thinking use the 1911 for HD. If not go simple and use a GP100. If awaken in the middle of the night and your fine motor skills are not yet up to speed you don't want to try and operate a 1911 if you're not used to shooting one. In any case, I'm a revolver guy so I would go with the GP100.

Lucky Derby
January 12, 2013, 08:24 AM
Either is a good choice, and I would be perfectly comfortable with either.
That said, I voted for the GP because quite often house guns (I know nothing of the particulars of your situation, so this may or may not apply) must be ready to use by shooters of varrying degrees of familiarity with the weapon. A solid DA revolver is about as forgiving as a firearm can be as for as being able to be effectivly used by a novice.

PONTIACDM
January 12, 2013, 08:42 AM
I own both an I voted for the gp. Reason is reality

LNK
January 12, 2013, 08:59 AM
I own both, and though neither would be my first choice, I voted for the GP100. The reason is I think my wife likes the simplicity of the revolver. She likes the fact that it is simple. Pull trigger and shoot. she would rather shoot full house 357 loads out of the GP than factory 45 fmj out of the 1911.

Consider who else may need to use it, then choose what you think is best...

LNK

LUCKYDAWG13
January 12, 2013, 09:10 AM
my vote was for the gp100 but my HD gun is a 12ga SxS

lobo9er
January 12, 2013, 09:23 AM
You could buy at least 2 GP100's for what a high quality 1911 will cost.
The 1911's that are in the GP100 price range vs a GP100 might be a better question.

wanderinwalker
January 12, 2013, 09:51 AM
20ga shotgun with #3 buck...

That said, of the two listed, the GP-100. Why? Well, other members of the household can use the revolver much more easily than a semi-auto. (She can handle a revolver but isn't interested enough to learn a semi. Fair enough.) The GP won't be subjected to limp-wrist malfunctions and the long, heavy DA trigger is less likely to result in an ND in the hands of an inexperienced user.

And just because it's a .357 doesn't mean you HAVE to load it with pedal-to-the-metal boomers. My 586 and 19 get .38 +Ps just for this reason. Though in my hands I like the 125gr Remington Golden Saber .357s too.

WoodchuckAssassin
January 12, 2013, 09:56 AM
I own both (well, the revolver is a S&W 686, but similar enough for this comparison) - and the 1911 is the one next to my bed. The only real reason is that I practice more with the 1911. I'd trust my life to either - it all depends on which platform you are most familiar with. Practice, Practice, Practice.

jmr40
January 12, 2013, 10:41 AM
so you're really only talking about one round.

Not really. Most 1911's come with 8+1 mags and for HD there is nothing wrong with using a 10+1 round. That gives you almost double the firepower.

A 45 acp is a lot quieter when fired indoors as well. Either would work, but for indoors use as a HD gun I'd take the 1911 every time. For a hiking or camping gun and when loaded with heavy bullets the 357 is a better choice from possble use against large animals.

Roadking Rider
January 12, 2013, 10:55 AM
1911 It just what I'm used to, and it's a natural pointer.

303tom
January 12, 2013, 11:29 AM
The 1911, more & larger holes..............

Fremmer
January 12, 2013, 11:50 AM
Use whichever you shoot most accurately.

JTQ
January 12, 2013, 02:47 PM
WoodchuckAssassin wrote,
I own both (well, the revolver is a S&W 686, but similar enough for this comparison) - and the 1911 is the one next to my bed. The only real reason is that I practice more with the 1911.
Me too.

However, this is also a factor

jmr40 wrote,
A 45 acp is a lot quieter when fired indoors as well.


And outdoors as well.

Additionally, have you ever shot a .357 Magnum in the dark, especially from something relatively short like a 4" barrel.

Rexster
January 12, 2013, 03:17 PM
Well, I have both, and plan to keep it that way. Either one would be a comforting back-up to my HD/SD/duty (PD) Remington 870P. I have made no secret of my affection for the GP100, having stated it is my favorite handgun, multiple times. A 4" .357 medium-large DA sixgun is about as good as it gets for one handgun to handle everything. My first handgun, over three decades ago, however, was an off-brand 1911, and my current 1911 is a better one, a Les Baer Thunder Ranch Special. I have trigger time with both systems. Some of the in-between trigger systems can be distracting, but long-stroke DA and crisp, short-stoke SA are both workable and familiar in my hands.

I have carried both the 1911 and GP100 in harm's way, and I have no problem continuing to do so.

This topic being "house" gun, however, narrows the parameters down. I do not need the versatility of the .357 inside a house. I prefer the .45 for night/low-light shooting, and for shooting within enclosed spaces. Both of these conditions exist within a house.

My final answer, specifically for a house handgun, for my personal use, is the 5" 1911. I have ignored the factor of other folks within the household; they have
access to their own houseguns, both long guns and handguns.

fWIW, I have never disremembered a 1911's thumb safety. Starting with a 1911, and then 29 years of using duty duty holster with thumb releases, have programmed me to start the draw with a flagged thumb.

ApacheCoTodd
January 12, 2013, 03:45 PM
My most common open carry is a full sized 1911 so there is one in its place each evening but the grabber for bumps in the night is in fact our stainless GP100 - though 3 incher.

If it's dark, I'm stumbly - whatever, I like the lack of moving parts, no mag to fall away, no safety to fumble etc...

Of course, I'm also one of those fellas that doesn't anticipate running cinematic gun battles through the house, yard and rest of the neighborhood either.

Bobson
January 12, 2013, 03:52 PM
I voted for reliability. In this instance that's the gp.
My thoughts exactly. I'd be all for the 1911 if you could put several hundred rounds downrange first, and establish that its a proverbial Glock; but that would mean you're stuck with something iffy in the meantime.

asia331
January 12, 2013, 09:28 PM
I voted GP100. I'm an EDC 1911 guy. The beauty of the GP100 or any revolver, is that any of my family can pick it up and employ it with near immediate effect.

Seafarer12
January 13, 2013, 01:08 AM
I voted for the revolver. I am not a 1911 guy. Revolvers are stupid simple just point and keep pulling the trigger till it goes click.

460Kodiak
January 13, 2013, 02:30 PM
I could go either way really. Both are great choices. The GP wins for ease of use and reliability, IMO. The 1911 wins on ammo capacity and

1911. Less risk of over penetration and easier on the ears indoors.
this coment is a major reason to favor the .45 acp more so.

I used to have my SP101 loaded with some warm .38 +P's. I figured that would save my ears, but may not save my life. Load it with .357's, and overpenetration becomes a worry for me because I live in a neigborhood.

The 1911 with standard pressure .45's seems a good middle ground to me.

PoserHoser
January 13, 2013, 03:17 PM
Whichever one you shoot better

TFIT
January 13, 2013, 03:20 PM
1911 with 5" barrel 7-8rds capacity or GP100 4"er 6rd capacity, which would you prefer and why?
I'd go with the 1911 for one reason. I am very comfortable with this weapon. I know revolvers are proven, and the GP is a very reliable platform, and a really great gun, but so is the 1911. I like it better. I wouldn't throw the GP100 down now! :-)

TFIT
January 13, 2013, 03:56 PM
I could go either way really. Both are great choices. The GP wins for ease of use and reliability, IMO. The 1911 wins on ammo capacity and


this coment is a major reason to favor the .45 acp more so.

I used to have my SP101 loaded with some warm .38 +P's. I figured that would save my ears, but may not save my life. Load it with .357's, and overpenetration becomes a worry for me because I live in a neigborhood.

The 1911 with standard pressure .45's seems a good middle ground to me.
I really like the 101, but agree with you. On the two calibers, .45.

cerberus65
January 13, 2013, 08:57 PM
I used to keep a .357 by the side of the bed. I switched to keeping a 1911 there for one reason: .45 ACP is a lower pressure round and will do less damage to our hearing if I ever have to pull the trigger inside the house when there hasn't been time to grab hearing protection.

smalls
January 13, 2013, 09:50 PM
I routinely carry a 1911 as my CPL gun (mainly winter), a Sig P250 Subcompact 9mm in warmer weather, and a Ruger LCP. With my carry guns, however, I don't leave the magazines loaded for more than a week without unloading them and giving them a "break". If this is overkill, and I am being over concerned about this, please advise.

You're actually weakening the springs. It's not the compression that weakens them, it's compression and decompression. People have found loaded USGI mags that haven't been shot in 40 years that still work.

I vote 1911, mostly because I'm not a revolver guy, and shoot the 1911 better than any gun I've ever tried. It's my daily carry and nightstand gun.

wep45
January 13, 2013, 10:07 PM
none of the above:neener:....get a S&W k frame.:cool:...

420Stainless
January 13, 2013, 11:26 PM
1911 - Just personal preference based upon familiarity. Been shooting a 1911 for 30+ years and only been shooting revolvers less than 10.

easyg
January 13, 2013, 11:37 PM
http://i112.photobucket.com/albums/n165/allenXdog/HPIM7181.jpg

I'm just not a 1911 fan.

TennJed
January 14, 2013, 12:17 AM
I am a revolver guy and voted for thr GP100, but my house gun is a S&W 5906 (9mm)

mljdeckard
January 14, 2013, 12:21 AM
Ever shot a revolver indoors?

tacxted
January 14, 2013, 12:23 AM
1911 with 5" barrel 7-8rds capacity or GP100 4"er 6rd capacity, which would you prefer and why?

I picked GP100

Ive shot a friends GP100. DA was smooth and controled, SA was light and clean.
Weight would help with follow up shots using .357 magnum.
Practice is cheaper with .38 special ($19.99) over .357 ($24.99) and .45 ($22.49) for that matter. I quickly searched midway for the prices using federal american eagle brand for comparison.

The only potential issue I can bring up with both guns is ability to mount a light. I know some 1911s can have rails and some .357 revolvers can as well. I would recommend purchasing a model which has a rail.

After another quick search I learned that ruger does not offer a GP100 with a rail. I did however find this: http://www.springfield-armory.com/armory.php?model=10

Therefore I will retract my recommendation for the heavy, powerful .357 in favor for a weapons light attachable 1911.

Unless of course you would consider another brand of .357 like the S&W M&P R8. What a Bad A** Revolver! http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product4_750001_750051_765757_-1_757770_757767_757751_ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

Hope this helps fxstchewy.

C0untZer0
January 14, 2013, 12:55 AM
To stick with the OP - I think a semi-auto is a better choice. The main thing for me is I like an SA trigger better than a DA trigger, two extra shots is better and even though I've seen Miculek - generally speaking, reloading a semi-auto is easier than reloading a revolver.

On the other hand, there is nothing in the OP about budget constraints, so if someone was going to get a gun specifically for their house (home defense) I'd recommend it be a 12 ga shotgun.

bannockburn
January 14, 2013, 01:32 PM
Between the two, I would go with an M1911 in .45 with a rail.

lobo9er
January 14, 2013, 04:37 PM
To stick with the OP - I think a semi-auto is a better choice.

If you spend more than what a GP100 costs on a high end 1911. At the same price point your comparing one the most durable, reliable revolvers being made right now to a budget 1911 that maybe hit or miss. Not apples to apples.

madwell
January 14, 2013, 11:26 PM
I voted GP100 which was my house gun for a number of years.

I did just switch to a semi auto though for some of the reasons listed by others.

mauiglide
January 15, 2013, 01:10 AM
I vote for the 1911 pistol as the primary HD gun and the revolver as a BUG.

Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX using Tapatalk 2

mdauben
January 15, 2013, 02:56 AM
I'd be happy with either platform. My issue is with the cartridge. A full bore 357 is going to be as good or better than a 45 but at the cost of much greater muzzle flash and noise which I feel are a problem if you may be firing it in an enclosed room, possibly in the dark.

You can mitigate this to an extent by using 38 spl ammo in the GP100 but then IMO you are taking a step down in effectiveness.

I used to keep a S&W 686 in my nightstand as a HD gun but after a lot of thought I switched it out for my Glock 21 instead.

ugaarguy
January 15, 2013, 03:31 AM
Between your two choices it would be a 1911 for me because it's the handgun I shoot best.

That said, which particular firearm I choose is pretty low on the list of HD priorities for me. My roommate and I live in a very low crime neighborhood, in a very low crime area of our city. We still keep our doors and windows locked. We know our neighbors and mutually keep our eyes open for anything suspicious. I have a medium-large sized American Bulldog mix mutt who hears things long before we do, and has a very distinctive alert bark: She serves as an early warning system. We keep our cell phones charged and nearby. There are Surefire and similar lithium battery lights throughout our home. There are several other precautions and measures we've taken to maintain security. Last, my 1911 and several other reliable firearms between us are safely stored but readily accessible.

Focus on your mindset and skill set first. Then pick a reliable firearm that's chambered in any good defensive cartridge as long as you shoot it well. For me that's service revolvers in .38 Spl and up, service pistols in 9mm and up, shotguns in 12 or 20 gauge with buck shot, and centerfire carbines of just about any caliber if loaded with rounds that are known to reliably and rapidly expand and/or fragment.

Dr.Rob
January 15, 2013, 05:45 AM
Either is a good choice. Use the one you shoot the most.

DM~
January 15, 2013, 11:43 AM
I voted GP, even though i keep an S&W 19 by my bed... BUT, i also keep a long or two gun close by too...

The revolver compared to the semi auto is more reliable, easier for someone other than me to shoot. I don't buy into the need for more than 6 shots, in this situation, as i'm NOT into the "spray n pray" technique...

I also don't buy into the revolver being a "problem" because of more noise or muzzle blast... In a shooting situation like this, that will be the last of your worries!

DM

PabloJ
January 15, 2013, 02:24 PM
1911 with 5" barrel 7-8rds capacity or GP100 4"er 6rd capacity, which would you prefer and why?
Trip to LGS could be eye opening. One of mine had full display of old S&Ws, Colts.....It would be even better had they not run out of AR15s. They even had LEGENDARY 2" Model 12 with flat cylinder release button (ole' vintage feature). Now is the time to shop for oldies but goodies.

iblong
January 15, 2013, 05:32 PM
I would have to say the 1911,If you have ever shot a 357 indoors with out
ear protection it is shockingly load with a impressive muzel blast.
I love my 357's but inside I'll take the 45.

tuj
January 15, 2013, 05:36 PM
If you have ever shot a 357 indoors without ear protection it is shockingly loud

I made the mistake once of shooting a .44 mag *outdoors* without hearing protection. My ears were ringing for about 4 days.

TreeDoc
January 16, 2013, 02:58 AM
Gp 100 was my choice between the 2, load with +P ammo. Had one on the nightstand for many years, moved to glock 17, with 20 rounds and on board light.

Superfuzz
January 16, 2013, 05:52 AM
Revolver for guaranteed trigger pull/bang methedology. No "in-battery" and no magazine fatigue concerns. Cant imagine you would do bad jumping either way...I just prefer the "house gun" to truly always be ready.

dos0711
January 16, 2013, 06:16 AM
1911 has less recoil that allows faster target re-acquisition. .45 = bigger hole in bad guy.

NMPOPS
January 16, 2013, 08:05 AM
I picked the GP100 cause its a revolver but actually my house gun is an S&W M-65!

2zulu1
January 16, 2013, 04:01 PM
I picked GP100

Ive shot a friends GP100. DA was smooth and controled, SA was light and clean.
Weight would help with follow up shots using .357 magnum.
Practice is cheaper with .38 special ($19.99) over .357 ($24.99) and .45 ($22.49) for that matter. I quickly searched midway for the prices using federal american eagle brand for comparison.

The only potential issue I can bring up with both guns is ability to mount a light. I know some 1911s can have rails and some .357 revolvers can as well. I would recommend purchasing a model which has a rail.

After another quick search I learned that ruger does not offer a GP100 with a rail. I did however find this: http://www.springfield-armory.com/armory.php?model=10

Therefore I will retract my recommendation for the heavy, powerful .357 in favor for a weapons light attachable 1911.

Unless of course you would consider another brand of .357 like the S&W M&P R8. What a Bad A** Revolver! http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product4_750001_750051_765757_-1_757770_757767_757751_ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

Hope this helps fxstchewy.
Those scandium N-frames are pleasant to shoot, even with full power handloads.

Here's my M327 TRR8 (Tactical Rail Revolver);

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/ScandiumSmiths009.jpg

Bottom of the shroud is drilled and tapped for a light, top is drilled and tapped for a red dot/holographic optic;

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/ScandiumSmiths010.jpg

What I've learned is 8 round moonclips are slower to load than 6 or 7 round speedloaders.

125gr SJHPs create a large wound channel and typically don't over penetrate.

Not much muzzle flash using AA #9 powder, but there's a huge fireball from the cylinder gap on this M686P/6".

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/357magAA9nightflash015.jpg

When traveling, I typically have the 686P/6" and a Colt 1911 Government in 45 auto on the night stand.

Both calibers are very suitable for night stand duty, you simply have to decide how much practice and training you're willing to devote to become proficient with your choice.

While some feet all one needs to do is pull the trigger on a DA revolver, placement of the trigger on the finger and grip is different than that of the 1911. The DA trigger pull of the GP 100 will never be as smooth or as fast as a 1911 and there's more of a tendency to jerk the trigger during rapid fire training sessions with the wheelgun.

Other potent calibers re available for the 1911 platform, 38 Super and 10mm come to mind and if you handload, the Super can push 125gr magnum bullets at magnum velocities, but with the recoil of a G17;


http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/38Super125XTPvx357mag125FTX011.jpg

Training, this out of the box Colt shot 400 flawless rounds, 150 of those rounds were fired as fast as I could load and pull the trigger;

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/1911rangeworkout007.jpg

This Colt became my CCW and I continued to push it hard, another 200 round session during an extreme heat range session;

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/Hottargets6-22-2007013.jpg

Included in the session was 70 rounds as fast as I could load and pull the trigger, right handed, left handed, Bill Jordan from the hip style, both hands with and without using the sights, ~7 yards;


http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/Hottargets6-22-2007011.jpg

I carried the mag back in the day and was fortunate enough to have superb instructors, same can be said for the 1911, but never on patrol.

Some observations, for me - weak hand advantage 1911
Split times advantage 1911
Range sessions - moving both, point shooting both, draw to first shot 1911. Rapid fire range sessions with the mag (not 38) and at about 50 rounds I need to put gloves on my left hand because the cylinder gets really hot. At about 70 rounds I put the mag down. When doing intense training shooting the magnum I'll bring 2-3 357s in order to allow for cool down times. 1911s get very hot to the touch too, but that's what the slide stop is for. :)

Some of the hardest hitting ammunition on the market;

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/45auto230RA45TPcowrib017.jpg

complete with the Ranger star;


http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/45auto230RA45TPcowrib018.jpg

I voted 1911, but it's a toss up for home defense. Furniture and carpet soak up some of the muzzle blast, but the advantage goes to the 45 for both lower blast and flash. IMO, 38 Special is a cop out, clear advantage to the 45 between these two calibers.

For training sessions at the range, if you only bring one gun, the advantage is with the 1911.

Handloading with hardcast bullets is the way to go with both calibers, I like to practice with 357/170gr Keith style bullets and either 185gr/200gr SWCs in 45.

Get both.

otasan56
January 16, 2013, 04:42 PM
Sgt York used an M1911 - that's good enough for me.

chipcom
January 16, 2013, 05:04 PM
I LOVE 1911s...but not knowing more detail of your situation I'd have to recommend the revolver (loaded with Cor-Bon .38 Special+P 125 grain JHP rather than .357) because it's simpler, has a shorter learning curve to minimum competence, and more forgiving of brain farts under stress.

Arkansas Paul
January 16, 2013, 05:09 PM
I like a revolver for a house gun myself. There's nothing to remember at all in a DA revolver. Just start pulling the trigger.

fxstchewy
January 26, 2013, 06:16 PM
One neck in neck poll.........:)

Vern Humphrey
January 26, 2013, 06:18 PM
1911 with 5" barrel 7-8rds capacity
Modern magazines for the M1911 hold 8 rounds, plus one up the spout, for a total of 9.

MrTwigg
January 26, 2013, 06:51 PM
The 1911 was my first handgun courtesy of Uncle Sam and I still carry one today.

I've tried many others and I always come back to the 1911. I have a Govt. and a Commander size and both will be my "forever guns" and there shall be no other. :D

PSALM 1911
In the beginning was the 1911, and the 1911 was THE pistol, and it was good. And behold the Lord said, thou shalt not muck with my disciple John's design for it is good and it worketh. For John made the 1911, and lo all of his weapons, from the designs which I, the Lord, gave him upon the mountain.
And shouldst thou muck with it, and hang all manner of foul implements upon it, and profane its internal parts, thou shalt surely have malfunctions, and in the midst of battle thou shalt surely come to harm.

And as the ages passed, men in their ignorance and arrogance didst forget the word of the Lord and began to profane the 1911. The tribe of the gamesman did place recoil spring guides and extended slide releases upon the 1911 and their metal smiths didst tighten the tolerances and alter parts to their liking, their clearness of mind being clouded by lust.

Their artisans did hang all manner of foul implements upon the 1911 and did so alter it that it became impractical to purchase. For lo, the artisans didst charge a great tax upon the purchasers of the 1911 so that the lowly field worker could not afford one. And the profaning of the internal parts didst render it unworkable when the dust of the land fell upon it.

And lo, they didst install adjustable sights, which are an abomination unto the Lord. For they doth break and lose their zero when thou dost need true aim. And those who have done so will be slain in great numbers by their enemies in the Great Battle.

And it came to pass that the Lord didst see the abomination wrought by man and didst cause, as he had warned, fearful malfunctions to come upon the abominations and upon the artisans who thought they could do no wrong.

Seeing the malfunctions and the confusion of men the lord of the underworld did see an opportunity to further ensnare man and didst bring forth pistols made of plastic, whose form was such that they looked and felt like a brick, yet the eyes of man being clouded, they were consumed by the plastic pistol and did buy vast quantities of them.

And being a deceitful spirit, the lord of the underworld did make these plastic pistols unamenable to the artisans of earth and they were unable to muck much with the design, and lo these pistols did appear to function.
And the Evil One also brought forth pistols in which the trigger didst both cock and fire them and which require a "dingus" to make them appear safe.

But man, being stupid, did not understand these new pistols and didst proceed to shoot themselves with the plastic pistol and with the trigger-cocking pistols for lo their manual of arms required great intelligence which man had long since forsaken. Yet man continue to gloat over these new pistols blaming evil forces for the negligent discharges which they themselves had committed.

And when man had been totally ensnared with the plastic pistol, the lord of the Underworld didst cause a plague of the terrible "Ka-Boom" to descend upon man and the plastic pistols delivered their retribution upon men. And there was a great wailing and gnashing of teeth in the land.

Then seeing that the eyes of man were slowly being opened and that man was truly sorrowful for his sinful misdeeds, the Lord did send his messengers in the form of artisans who did hear and obey the teachings of the prophet and who didst restore the profaned 1911s to their proper configuration, and lo, to the amazement of men, they didst begin to work as the prophet had intended.

And the men of the land didst drive out the charlatans and profaners from the land, and there was joy and peace in the land, except for the evil sprits which tried occasionally to prey on the men and women of the land and who were sent to the place of eternal damnation by the followers of John.

Tcruse
January 26, 2013, 06:54 PM
Semi-automatic is a better choice. At least you have a reasonable chance to reload if needed. Also, I think that a semi-automatic is more likely to not have a malfunction. My thinking is when a wheel gun malfunctions it is out of service until a major repair, where a jam for a semi-automatic is easily handled. If the choices were opened up I would have voted for a full size Glock or S&W M&P or Ruger SRxx in .40 or 9mm. 9mm being preferred for the extra round count.

KTXdm9
January 26, 2013, 10:50 PM
Both great guns. I voted 1911 for higher capacity and ease of reload.

tomrkba
January 26, 2013, 11:06 PM
I agree that a semi-automatic pistol is a better choice. However, only two choices have been presented.

Most 1911's require too much work to get running properly. It is essential that you choose a good manufacturer and bring it up to service level specification. The minimum gun I would be would be a Dan Wesson Valor. You'll need to know what you're doing with regard to maintenance. It is very important that you do the proper maintenance regimen. Most people do not have these skills.

10-8 Performance articles on the 1911 (http://www.10-8performance.com/pages/Articles.html)

Given the above, I'd choose the revolver over the 1911. I'd get the 1911 if I had the armorer skills.

In terms of the revolver, the GP100 is good enough. I prefer pre-2000 S&W revolvers, though there are a few tempting N-Frames that have locks. Night sights are available for the GP100 from Meprolight and XS Sights. Do a trigger job with a kit from triggershims.com (use the 11# hammer spring and 8# trigger return spring).

fordm48
January 27, 2013, 12:25 AM
Without knowing more about the 1911 you're considering, I have to go with the GP100. I'd personally go with a different semi-auto in that price range.

b7tac
January 27, 2013, 01:04 AM
I vote 1911 - not necessarily because it is better, but because I like it better.

mister2
January 27, 2013, 09:59 AM
Survey was closer than I thought. Without going into details, I simply feel more comfortable and secure with a 1911.

jad0110
January 27, 2013, 05:37 PM
Didn't vote. Personally, I like both. Either will serve you well, assuming the 1911 is from quality manufacturer. I own and carry a 1911, as well as numerous revolvers. Go with the platform that give you greater confidence. And if you are really tight on funds, keep in mind the GP won't require as extensive a period of ammo testing (including expensive hollow points), so keep that in mind as well.

Furncliff
January 28, 2013, 12:26 AM
1911, because that's what I'm most accurate with, I much prefer the trigger and the ability to recharge the gun quickly. Having said that, I don't keep any of my guns loaded.

lobo9er
January 28, 2013, 12:48 AM
Any idea on 1911 yet?

otasan56
January 28, 2013, 10:58 AM
I have a .357, a .44, and two M1911A1 .45s. I choose my Glock Model 17 and its 17 rounds of +p+ 115gr JHPs. :):)

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