Loaded Home Defense Gun(s) and Kids - Is it possible?


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777funk
January 12, 2013, 10:48 AM
I have always heard it's best to keep guns in one location and ammo in another. I tend to agree that this makes sense.

There's probably more chance of an accident with an accessible loaded gun than the risk most would have of having to quickly take down an intruder.

That said, where's the trade-off? Who wouldn't want the ease and speed of the loaded gun when called upon.

I'm not one who believes that unlocking a safe in the dark is faster than popping a magazine in a pistol or putting a shot-shell in the chamber and slamming it shut.

So where is the solution. I've always been out on this one.

And it's hard to live without children at some point entering a home (even for those without children). So it's a pretty real question for all walks of life. Curious what your answer is to this.

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Sam1911
January 12, 2013, 11:06 AM
FIRST -- GUN-proof your KIDS rather than kid-proof your guns. Talk with them, explain things to them, give them all the SUPERVISED access they want. Demystify the weapons and hammer home the safety rules at every opportunity. This is primary above all other concerns.

Second -- there are plenty of ways to take reasonable precautions but it can start with a simple analysis of your risk. Worrying that your toddler is going to insert a magazine into your 1911, rack the slide and shoot is quite unrealistic. So probably until they're at LEAST 5-6, simply storing it where they shouldn't get to it, and with the mag removed and chamber cleared, is a reasonable level of caution.

For more school-aged kids, and on up to teenagers, some kind of lock is probably the best plan. They should by then be very well programmed to be gun-safe anyway, but a lock helps them if they have a moment of weakness, or the hands of a little friend of theirs somehow manages to wander into your storage location.

This can be one of the inexpensive bed-side pistol vaults, or a locking rack, or any of several other options.

For my family, my primary defensive shotgun is stored "cruiser ready" and with the slide racked about 1/2 way open, with a cable lock run through the action. Even without the cable lock, it's pretty questionable that any but my oldest would be able to figure out how to (or be able to) rack a shell into the chamber anyway -- and after many years and quite a few kids, not one of them has ever shown any desire to fool with it.

That would be pointless anyway as they all know that they can have all the access they want -- I'll always stop what I'm doing to show and tell gun stuff with them -- and even go shoot any of my guns they want to. They're more likely to try to go play with the lawn mower or my power tools than the firearms.

MedWheeler
January 12, 2013, 11:22 AM
There are countless thread here on this. One of the methods that pops up many times in each and every one of them is that the "first-up" firearm is always within reach of the "first-up" defender. That "FID" in my home is me, and my gun is on my hip at all times when I'm up and dressed. I do have a four-year old daughter, and she knows it's there, but I do admit I have not tried yet to educate her beyond what she's already figured out (which isn't much.) That day will come, though.

But you, like others here, may find that to be an extreme. That's for you to decide, as you know yourself and your situation more than any of us could. As pointed out above, educating children about them at an early age to remove the "mystery" element goes very far to prevent misuse later. That's a practice we taught in the fire service; teach children about fire by letting them experiment with it under controlled conditions early, and the fact is, they'll be much less likely to play with matches or start fires later.

777funk
January 12, 2013, 11:22 AM
FIRST -- GUN-proof your KIDS rather than kid-proof your guns. Talk with them, explain things to them, give them all the SUPERVISED access they want. Demystify the weapons and hammer home the safety rules at every opportunity. This is primary above all other concerns.

....
I agree 100% on this. I try to let my kids shoot what they're ready for (mostly pellets at this point) as much as possible and only that with supervision. They need to be taught in order to learn. I'm not one who believes toy guns are a good idea simply because they can lead to a casual attitude with guns. For instance, I'd never want one of my kids pointing any type of real gun (loaded or unloaded) at anyone. So I don't like getting this habit started with toys. Everyone's opinion is different here. Just what I think about toy guns.

And yes you are right, keeping the mystery out of guns is one of the best ideas.

OptimusPrime
January 12, 2013, 11:34 AM
+1
Demystify constantly, quarterly in my household. While supervised, "here, this is how I know it's empty see? You look. You hold it. Where should you point it? Should you touch the trigger? Hold it again, heavy? Set it down, what do you do when you see one at your friends' house? What should you say? What if your friend says....." I know it's working because they are getting bored with it. :D
But OP's question was keeping arms defense-ready too, and the cruiser-ready is a great option for me, but you need to make your own decision on your situation. For me, the scattergun has the slide pulled back with the round hanging loose at the bottom. I need to, I push it forward and go boom. My kids can't do that physically so I feel comfortable.

hovercat
January 12, 2013, 12:11 PM
The settlers of our country did it. Kids have not changed much in 150+- years. Check the laws of your state.

smalls
January 12, 2013, 12:21 PM
The easiest solution is to carry it in your body, even at home.

At night, I stick it on my night stand. I have a quick access safe for my wife's pistol, because she doesn't want to carry.

Ehtereon11B
January 12, 2013, 12:32 PM
I agree with gun-proofing your kids. I have a son on the way and he will be taught as soon as he is able.

I recommend using a shotgun as a HD weapon, loaded or saddle loaded with a variety of ammunition. There are quite a few companies now that make trigger locks that mount directly on the shotgun that use quick release buttons similar to bed side gun vaults.

Skylerbone
January 12, 2013, 12:50 PM
My policy is to keep one pistol loaded and chambered, the AR with a magazine in, empty chamber. The rifle remains sacked and my HD pistol is also my EDC which goes from belt holster to bedside retention holster.

My 4, 6 & 8 year olds are probably more aware of firearms than I was at their age even having grown up with firearms in view all my life. Under supervision my children are shown all they care to see. They help with basic reloading tasks and all now have their own rifles. No airsoft, no pellets, no toy guns and no violent video games.

Love, patience, encouragement and learning...you know, typical gun owner mentality.

gearhead
January 12, 2013, 01:29 PM
My dad kept a loaded revolver under the mattress on his side for as long as I remember. I also knew not to mess with it and I was never tempted.

mavracer
January 12, 2013, 02:10 PM
For gun proofing the kids:
My kids always had a simple rule they can look at any gun they wanted just ask me first. they have grown up to be resposible gun owners themselves. Their friends and other family's children have been given the same instructions.
As to kid proofing the guns:
all my guns are kept locked up except the shotgun and carbine that are unloaded but have ammo near them. My CCW is on my person most of the time and I have a small safe on my nightstand that currently has a cocked and locked 1911 in it. I open the safe when I'm in bed and lock it up when I get up.

gamestalker
January 12, 2013, 02:44 PM
SAM1911 said it right, gun proof your kids.

I raised my children with training and exposure to firearms at an early age. They saw what happens to an animal when it is shot with a firearm. I allowed them to hear the report from a firearm at an early age, but from a safe enough distance as to not harm their hearing. Now many years later as grown responsible adults I have asked them if they ever so much as touched any of the firearms in our home when they were juveniles. To my absolute faith in how I taught them, the answer was no, we never even handled them once without you or Mom being present, and permission to do so.

My Wife and I didn't buy them toy guns either. In my opinion allowing children to play with toy guns destroys and contrdicts everything you try to teach them about gun handling and safety.

GS

777funk
January 12, 2013, 03:55 PM
SAM1911 said it right, gun proof your kids.

I raised my children with training and exposure to firearms at an early age. They saw what happens to an animal when it is shot with a firearm. I allowed them to hear the report from a firearm at an early age, but from a safe enough distance as to not harm their hearing. Now many years later as grown responsible adults I have asked them if they ever so much as touched any of the firearms in our home when they were juveniles. To my absolute faith in how I taught them, the answer was no, we never even handled them once without you or Mom being present, and permission to do so.

My Wife and I didn't buy them toy guns either. In my opinion allowing children to play with toy guns destroys and contrdicts everything you try to teach them about gun handling and safety.

GS
I have to admit, even though I always knew where the guns were as a kid and usually where the ammo was also, I never thought twice about touching them (aside from hunting or shooting with my dad). As a teen the rules changed a little. I could probably have gotten away with showing a friend or two what we shot (no idiots were allowed in our home when I was growing up. Parents approved or they weren't invited).

skidder
January 12, 2013, 04:36 PM
Kids are naturally curious and there are options that will not defeat the purpose. It's not my kids I worry about, but family and friends that come to visit.

I have this $40 Winchester safe from Walmart bolted to my dresser. I keep it unlocked at night for easy access and locked during the day. Even with it locked one can still access their weapon in a matter of a couple seconds. Inside I have my wife's and my weapon loaded with an addition speed loader.


http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Safe/WinSafe.jpg

http://i1212.photobucket.com/albums/cc456/exlogger/Safe/RugerSafe.jpg

Chuck R.
January 12, 2013, 05:13 PM
I also believe in gun-proofing children, but I also remember what I was like, and more importantly my friends were like. Thereís also a concern of coming home during a break-in and facing one of your own weapons.

I use V-Lines for my HD stuff, no batteries, very quick, relatively cheap peace of mind. IF itís not physically on my person, itís locked up. IMHO every defense should be layered, IF you canít figure out how to buy the few seconds it takes to get into one of the small vaults you might want to consider carrying 24/7 or moving.

http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a5/CFRHunter/Shooting/DSC00116.jpg

http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a5/CFRHunter/X-Mas060958.jpg

Chuck

sean326
January 12, 2013, 07:33 PM
I never let any toy guns in the house, only real ones.
both my kids got crickets (small Pa made .22 bolt rifle) at about 5 or 6. 1911's in their early teens.
We have our own range and shoot weekly or any time they wanted. In my house guns were no more fascinating or unusual than the knives in the kitchen.
I also kept/keep my carry gun on me the whole day, then placed it in a simplex gun box under the bed.
now... not so much of an issue my little guy is older and keeps a suppressed Sten in his room... just in case. my bedside gun is a short barreled 870 with an extended magazine and pistol grip, first couple rounds #8 shot, last few 00. Wife has a .38 smith snubby on her side i also have a glock 30 on my side near the the 870.

dicky r
January 12, 2013, 07:41 PM
Seriously ? What do you do when your kids have to defend themselves ? Or you ? Have you heard of TEACHING YOUR KIDS ? Mine go to the range with me. They field strip all my guns and theirs IN MY HOME. They know what guns do. They know the four commandments of guns. They check and clear every weapon every time. Why ? Because I TAUGHT THEM. Spend some time teaching your kids. Ignorance is not bliss. Ignorance is deadly. Ignorance is the precursor to stupidity.

sean326
January 12, 2013, 08:04 PM
Seriously ? What do you do when your kids have to defend themselves ? Or you ? Have you heard of TEACHING YOUR KIDS ? Mine go to the range with me. They field strip all my guns and theirs IN MY HOME. They know what guns do. They know the four commandments of guns. They check and clear every weapon every time. Why ? Because I TAUGHT THEM. Spend some time teaching your kids. Ignorance is not bliss. Ignorance is deadly. Ignorance is the precursor to stupidity.
who were you talking about?
maybe i missed something but it looks like all the posters above were teaching their kids about guns......

rhartwell
January 12, 2013, 08:22 PM
I gun proofed my kids at a very young age. When my daughter was about 3 I took her out and had her pull the trigger on a rifle I was holding. Problem was solved. Take you kids shoot a watermellon or a glass jar of water (clean up the glass). It makes them understand really quick that a gun is not a toy. I never had a problem.

asia331
January 12, 2013, 08:24 PM
Teach your children well.

Here's what works for me.
1.The Bible teaches us; "Train your child in the way he should go and he will not stray from it when he grows old"
2.When there is an "unsecured" weapon in your home it best be on your person.

Fiv3r
January 13, 2013, 11:46 AM
My daughter is 2 and a half and not ready for an education beyond to not touch. I keep my LCP and 1911 locked in a similar safe as shown above. Bump in the night, roll over and slap on a tap light, 3 buttons and the safe is open and both are loaded and ready to fire. If anyone has made it through my house and to my bedroom from the time of the crash in 5-10 seconds, i was already in major trouble.

I keep my daily carry piece in a locked nanovault bolted to the floorboard of my truck. After I drop my daughter off at day-care, I unlock it and wear it for the day. When i get home, I lock it back up. The only time I juggle guns is when my work schedule requires that I carry a smaller pistol like my LCP. I usually swap out the Glock in my truck, but both are small enough to fit in the Nano.

My firearms are always within pretty quick reach and out of little hands. My non HD guns are locked unloaded in a cabinet with ammo and mags stored locked separately. I feel comfortable with this set up until she is old enough for training.

KTXdm9
January 13, 2013, 02:52 PM
Lots of drawer safe options out there. Try amazon.

easyg
January 13, 2013, 11:15 PM
I keep my handguns loaded and at easy access (on the nightstand, in a kitchen cabinet, in the computer desk.
But it's just the wife, the dog, and myself in the house.

When my nephews and nieces visit the guns go in the safe.

No matter how well you think you have taught/trained your kids about firearms, you simply cannot trust them.
Kids do the craziest things.

Diamondback6
January 13, 2013, 11:22 PM
Check out Mas Ayoob's book Gun Proof Your Kids.

PedalBiker
January 13, 2013, 11:24 PM
Do you ever leave gas in your car? Do you ever leave the car keys on the kitchen table?

I like the loaded gun in a holster on the hip approach. It's secure and available. The next option is a Simplex locked safe. No batteries and I can open it with my eyes closed, so can my wife.

My kids know how to shoot, they know not to touch any guns without supervision.

We have plenty of Nerf guns in the house. It's not hard to tell toys from the real thing. We require safety glasses and no shooting to the head.

Bladez
January 13, 2013, 11:36 PM
I agree with making your kids gun safe I believe everyone should have to go through gun safety training. My daughter has been shooting since she was six and has never messed with a gun when were not at the range or hunting. I have found a biometric safe works well to store my home defense gun

chris in va
January 14, 2013, 09:36 AM
Worrying that your toddler is going to insert a magazine into your 1911, rack the slide and shoot is quite unrealistic. So probably until they're at LEAST 5-6, simply storing it where they shouldn't get to it, and with the mag removed and chamber cleared, is a reasonable level of caution.

You should see my neighbor's 2 year old. He showed me how to use my Ipad the other day. He also has quite the mechanical mindset and loves toy guns, knowing how to load his Nerf rotary magazine.

easyg
January 14, 2013, 02:48 PM
You should see my neighbor's 2 year old.
I've yet to see a 2 year old with the hand strength to rack the slide of a pistol.

And if you have a Springfield Armory XD or a 1911 I doubt that the 2 year old's hand would be able to deactivate the grip safety while trying to rack the slide.

Still, older kids cannot be trusted around guns.

CWL
January 14, 2013, 03:46 PM
I use both of these safes to store my HD guns. Most emergencies will be late night/early morning so I wouldn't mess with any locks that require fine motor skills under stress and in the dark. This rules out keys, combo spin locks or even 10-key type buttons.

I'm using a Gun Vault for next to the bed, and Barska Biometric Gun Safe (locker) for the shotgun.

Gun Vault holds 2 pistols, brights and reloads. Is opened with 4-button combo latch that you set. This can be done in total darkness.

Barska can hold up to 20 "fingerprints" so you can enter digits from both hands as well as add family members as desired. For Barska biometric, first push the button and then place your finger in the panel for confirmation, it will then unlock.

http://www.gunvault.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/g/v/gvb1000-image-1.png

http://www.barska.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/barska-biometric-rifle-safes.jpg

Claude Clay
January 14, 2013, 03:53 PM
no toy guns in house

as was said--gun proof the kids. when my daughter was growing i would test her to keep a secret. when she had proven herself ( age 5) i introduced her to the 4 rules and a 10-22. she kept the secret till she graduated high school. very liberal where i live.

for home defense i used 2 browning HP's placed up & away and the wife & i carried the loaded magazines. yes safeties can fail and i functione tested them every time i changed the clocks.

now she is of age ( and an instructor in her own right) and got a present...one of the BHP's.

each child and family is different enough that you have to figure out what will work for you...and be prepared to make mid-course corrections.

bubba in ca
January 14, 2013, 04:09 PM
Common media pap--guns should be unloaded. Yes, sporting guns should be unloaded when not in use-cleaned, lubed, and stored securely. But the natural law right of self defense and the constitutional right to keep and bear arms have little to do with sporting arm. HD guns should always be loaded, period. Put them in a safe or whatever to help prevent unauthorized use, but keep them loaded so you are just one key turn away at most.

I will also speculate than not 1 American in 10 is capable of training their kids properly with something approaching 100 certainty to see that the guns were not misused by the kids or guests. I also would not want a burglar to get a gun out of a night stand drawer when I was not home. Sort out your risks and keep your LOADED guns somewhere secure but accessible.

mljdeckard
January 14, 2013, 04:17 PM
Depends on the kids and the situation. For all of the kids who are regularly in my house, I can leave them out, loaded, no problem. But for my oldest (ex step) child who is 14, I don't trust him as much. He's impressionable and a bit loopy sometimes. My youngest is autistic, and really has no concept of what a gun is. He also has boundless curiousity and no boundaries at all. If either of them were around often I would certainly have to be more secure.

FAS1
January 15, 2013, 06:48 PM
I'm not one who believes that unlocking a safe in the dark is faster than popping a magazine in a pistol or putting a shot-shell in the chamber and slamming it shut.

If your HD weapon of choice is a handgun you should be able to retrieve it with one hand in the dark in a matter of seconds. I think I could do this faster than load a magazine and chamber a round. Not to mention one handed vs two could be a real help if you happen to be fighting someone off. My HD gun is always chambered.

http://fas1safe.com/images/13466222496121215815641.jpeg

481
January 15, 2013, 07:04 PM
Definitely with everyone on educating/gun-proofing our kids and having the only firearm available in the house on my hip at all times.

At all other times, all firearms are secured (in a large gun-safe).

CraigC
January 15, 2013, 07:59 PM
Kinda hard to defend the homestead if your peashooter is empty and stored separately from the stuff that goes "bang".

I agree with post #2, gun-proof your kids.

Teachu2
January 15, 2013, 08:00 PM
My HD guns are in a Barska biometric programmed for my prints and the wife's. Inside it are a 12ga pump, a M&P 15 Sport, and a Sig p2022 9mm - all loaded and ready to go. On my nightstand is my carry gun of the day, again loaded and chambered. If we have grandkids overnight, I put my CCW in the Barska unless it's my 11 yo (going on 30)grandson - who is well-trained in firearm safety.

All the rest of the firearms are in safes. Every safe has at least one loaded handgun. Add in the alarm system, two noisy dogs, several nosy neighbors, a long driveway off a quiet street, and a safe in my primary vehicle - and I think we've got it adequately covered.

My sons were 6, 7 and 11 when I got 'em. Before I married their mom, we all went to the range. They each got to shoot, and that ended the curiousity issue. They all own and respect firearms as adults, and now we're working together to train the next generation. Oldest son chuckled when I asked him if it was OK for me to take the 11 yo to the range to shoot a pistol - he said that it could get expensive....

InkEd
January 15, 2013, 08:19 PM
Teach your kids and make the guns hard for them access.

Skylerbone
January 15, 2013, 10:10 PM
First, I treat all of my firearms alike. I would never consider loading any of them before storage in the main safe whether ideal for defense or hunting.

Second, I still say best policy is carry it then keep it where it's accessible at night. Here's a nice solution for those not wishing to push buttons: http://www.crossbreedholsters.com/BedsideBackup/tabid/99/List/0/ProductID/14/CategoryID/4/Level/1/Default.aspx?SortField=ProductName,ProductName. From hip to bedside, repeat daily.

Nasty
January 16, 2013, 08:02 AM
smalls and 481 said it above.

All my stuff is in the safe except for my CCW/HD, which is on my body 24/7 (or on the nightstand next to me).

The only exception is my wife...who's carry is sometimes on her and otherwise locked up.

She's *always* dangerous.:fire:

foghornl
January 16, 2013, 08:27 AM
No children in my home.

When I am up, the 'GI-45' is on me. Bedside table at night, in safe when visitors come over.

303tom
January 16, 2013, 09:49 AM
When I was a kid my father always had firearms sitting or laying around, myself, 2 brothers & a sister never messed with em, we were educated, we knew if we touched em we would get our britches fanned & none of us ever got shot by someone playing with a gun...........

USAF_Vet
January 16, 2013, 08:58 PM
I have taken my kids hunting and target shooting. In my bedroom I have a 12 gauge with a full tube loaded, within arms reach. My carry gun is in the holster on my nightstand, with one in the chamber.

My gun cabinet is closed and locked, but most of the guns in there are either loaded, or have rounds readily available, except for a few.

I have taught my kids, and many of their friends, about gun safety and safe gun handling. I honestly don't worry about them. Some of their friends... different story.

303tom
January 16, 2013, 09:38 PM
I have taken my kids hunting and target shooting. In my bedroom I have a 12 gauge with a full tube loaded, within arms reach. My carry gun is in the holster on my nightstand, with one in the chamber.

My gun cabinet is closed and locked, but most of the guns in there are either loaded, or have rounds readily available, except for a few.

I have taught my kids, and many of their friends, about gun safety and safe gun handling. I honestly don't worry about them. Some of their friends... different story.
Still say we need a LIKE BUTTON.............

raindog
January 16, 2013, 09:42 PM
There are only two loaded guns in my house. One is in a locked GunVault beside the bed. The other is in another GunVault when it's not on my hip.

BTW, all ammo and reloading components are locked up, too, though not in high-security fireproof safes. About the only gun-related things that aren't locked up are my muffs because our 3-year-old likes to wear them when mommy's vacuuming.

P-Dog
January 17, 2013, 06:19 PM
I'm a big believer in edum-a-cate'em! As they get old enough, teach them how to shoot, clean, maintain, reload, whatever. Takes the mystery out of a firearm and they learn valuable skills along the way. Hiding them from it allows the Hollywood <deleted> and video games to leave them with their own conclusions and curiousities.

Vurtle
January 17, 2013, 10:32 PM
I keep all guns locked except my edc, and it stays next to me at night with magazine in and chamber empty. I keep an orange plastic version of my glock laying around the house so my kids do not think the gun is mysterious and curious. The plastic gun is a great trainer for them in regards to safe handling and shooting technique. They also go with me to the range almost everytime. At the range, if they violate my safety rules they have a time out for atleast 5 minutes.

TFIT
January 19, 2013, 12:35 AM
I have always heard it's best to keep guns in one location and ammo in another. I tend to agree that this makes sense.

There's probably more chance of an accident with an accessible loaded gun than the risk most would have of having to quickly take down an intruder.

That said, where's the trade-off? Who wouldn't want the ease and speed of the loaded gun when called upon.

I'm not one who believes that unlocking a safe in the dark is faster than popping a magazine in a pistol or putting a shot-shell in the chamber and slamming it shut.

So where is the solution. I've always been out on this one.

And it's hard to live without children at some point entering a home (even for those without children). So it's a pretty real question for all walks of life. Curious what your answer is to this.
First, the best thing you can do to eliminate/reduce accidents is proper training. Keeping loaded guns in the house with children is not unsafe when you do things right. When the children are too young to even thing about such things, they don't even know the gun(s) are in the house. Keep them in a safe place!!! It's just being responsible. I should mention it helps to be well trained on the firearm yourself, and proper safety habits. Once the children are old enough, train them!!! It also helps if you have obedient children, and also keep the guns secured. You don't get what you expect, you get what you inspect. Don't leave children to their own devices. Keep the weapons locked up! Do not trust children beyond their capabilities. Think about when you were a kid...you were curious and believed nothing bad would happen to you. Well, so do your kids. :-)

jhco50
January 19, 2013, 03:09 AM
I started my children at 5 years of age. I drummed safety into them, taught them how to operate the firearm and when one of them doubted me I showed them a rabbit I killed in front of them. That got there attention and they then realized why the safety lectures. I never had a problem with them even wanting to examine one at home.

TFIT
January 19, 2013, 03:19 PM
I started my children at 5 years of age. I drummed safety into them, taught them how to operate the firearm and when one of them doubted me I showed them a rabbit I killed in front of them. That got there attention and they then realized why the safety lectures. I never had a problem with them even wanting to examine one at home.
To each their own. What works, works! I think the best thing is for the adult to be the adult, and show their kids how to be a good one. No one knows their kids better than they do, and so your method worked for you. It would be great if a lot more parents knew how to be good parents...meaning they know their roll and don't let the kids just "grow up". Good advice your input.

ku4hx
January 19, 2013, 03:35 PM
When my son was 11 years old, he and a group of his friends were at a friend's house. One of the kids found a pistol sitting on some piece of furniture. The mom basically panicked but did at least tell the kids not to touch it.

My son walked over to it, picked it up (as the mom raised her voice to him), dropped the magazine, locked the slide back and made sure the chamber was empty ... it was. He then walked over to the mom, handed her the loaded magazine and told her the gun was now safe. When the mom asked how did he know what to do, he replied, "My dad taught me".

Educate your kids, teach them to shoot, teach them how to be safe and how to make a gun safe. You can't prevent 100% of all tragedies, but you can make your kids part of the solution and not part of the problem.

duns
January 20, 2013, 11:19 AM
I'm an immigrant and in my former country was not allowed to own guns for protection.

In the US, I have not had the issue of small children but have had the issue of adults with intermittent (not extreme) mental health issues. My solution has been to keep guns locked up except for one, which is either on my person or under my pillow. if the mental health issues were more serious, my policy would be locked up or on my person.

jjjitters
January 20, 2013, 02:26 PM
I'm the youngest of five kids and growing up there was always guns around. I knew even at an age when I couldn't lift a rifle that I was NOT to touch them. I feared for my life (in a kids view of it) of my dad if I touched them. By 6 or 7 I had a BB gun and safety was absolutely pounded in. Any mistake resulted in loss of the gun and other punishments for a long while. Under a certain age I think a gun up high or in a hard to reach place is fine. Especially if the mag is out but nearby or the gun is made extra safe without being hard to use if needed. Certain guns are better for young'uns due to being hard to set off with kids fingers or such.
It's all about setting the strict rules early on and make sure they are afraid to even dare to touch them till old enough to know how to properly handle and make them safe. Parenting at it's basics.

ObsceneJesster
January 27, 2013, 04:44 AM
@Chuck or anyone else who may know what it is. What kind of safe is holding the shotgun in that picture?

Skylerbone
January 27, 2013, 06:03 AM
http://www.vlineind.com/ProductDetail.php?product_id=33

kbbailey
January 27, 2013, 08:11 AM
My setup is exactly like skidder's in post #14. I also have 2 small but bright flashlites in the safe. They are the only loaded guns in the house.

Chuck R.
January 27, 2013, 08:38 AM
Nope, itís not the shotgun case, I went with the slightly larger ďRifle Caseí because sometimes I use my AR and the Shotgun Case is too slim:

http://www.vlineind.com/ProductDetail.php?product_id=34

This way there's extra room for ammo, handgun, lights, etc.

Chuck

JRWhit
January 27, 2013, 08:51 AM
When my son was 11 years old, he and a group of his friends were at a friend's house. One of the kids found a pistol sitting on some piece of furniture. The mom basically panicked but did at least tell the kids not to touch it.

My son walked over to it, picked it up (as the mom raised her voice to him), dropped the magazine, locked the slide back and made sure the chamber was empty ... it was. He then walked over to the mom, handed her the loaded magazine and told her the gun was now safe. When the mom asked how did he know what to do, he replied, "My dad taught me".

Educate your kids, teach them to shoot, teach them how to be safe and how to make a gun safe. You can't prevent 100% of all tragedies, but you can make your kids part of the solution and not part of the problem.
Training works. I've been teaching my daughter, every gun is loaded. Don't pick it up or touch without me there and without knowing how to unload it. Simply put, ask me first to handle, and if needed how to unload.
Obviously, my guns aren't all loaded and are always locked up, but it has taught her to check first even if I checked before handing it to her. Now every time she asks me about a firearm I ask her back," Is it loaded? How do you unload it?" And her reply is,"Yes it is. Can you show me."

mister2
January 27, 2013, 09:07 AM
When I was training to qualify for CCW, one of the unforgettable points I took away was my responsibility for securing my firearm, to the extent of it being the *fifth* of the the usual four gun safety rules. I believe this pertains to everyone, but that everyone has a unique situation which requires different measures. Whatever works.

Training of MY kids is essential and was done. The potential problem is when there are OTHER kids in the house who may not be trained. Back to my previous point.

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