toughest most rugged pistol ever made


PDA






ba ba booey
January 14, 2013, 09:23 AM
What do you consider to be the toughest, most rugged pistol ever made? Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function. The only requirement is that it be semi automatic and chambered in something from .380 to .45acp.

If you enjoyed reading about "toughest most rugged pistol ever made" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
sigarms228
January 14, 2013, 09:37 AM
http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/vv60/kk9zz/smileyvault-popcorn.gif

LNK
January 14, 2013, 09:44 AM
Um, let me guess....................Glock?:banghead:

LNK

Chevelle SS
January 14, 2013, 09:46 AM
Glock 19

2wheels
January 14, 2013, 09:54 AM
If my spidey senses are correct, it sounds like some Glock fanboyin' going on round here.

Carry on boys, carry on.

wow6599
January 14, 2013, 09:59 AM
toughest most rugged pistol ever made

3rd Gen S&W's?

CyberRon
January 14, 2013, 10:02 AM
Ever try a Springfield XD or XDm? I have two and they're great!

Carpedium
January 14, 2013, 10:05 AM
Hi-Point .45

Onmilo
January 14, 2013, 10:07 AM
Bryco .380

meanmrmustard
January 14, 2013, 10:09 AM
Cz 75 p01

tarosean
January 14, 2013, 10:17 AM
Probably want to use the search feature to find the 1911 that was buried for an unknown number of years.

tuj
January 14, 2013, 10:19 AM
Glock vs. dog:

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t4/presto_z/IMAG1108.jpg

beatledog7
January 14, 2013, 10:22 AM
beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function.

Can we first discover the reason why anyone would do this to a pistol then rationally expect it to function? Sure, things happen to guns, and it's nice to know any particular gun's weaknesses, but to intentionally try to damage one to the point of failure--that's just Internet sensationalism.

45_auto
January 14, 2013, 10:26 AM
Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function.

I'll give you 10:1 odds that I can take out any pistol ever made with one blow from a sledgehammer. You put $1,000 in an escrow account, I'll put in $10,000, then you pick the pistol. If it still functions after I take just one swing at it with the sledgehammer then you get the $10,000.

CPLofMARINES
January 14, 2013, 11:02 AM
Looks like dog wins, unless dog was eliminated after that.
Wondering if mag can still be inserted after that?

Semper Fi

bannockburn
January 14, 2013, 11:11 AM
Actually I would think something made by the Soviets (like a Tokarev), during WWII would probably qualify as the toughest most rugged pistol ever made. I mean consider the very simple and basic design of the gun, the elements under which many of them were built, the quality of the metals used and the subsequent assembly process, and then factor in the brutal weather and fighting conditions that they were subject to and I believe a strong case could be made for the Tokarev TT-33.

Fishbed77
January 14, 2013, 01:09 PM
Ruger Standard/Mark II/Mark III.

Considering that these are built for the .22LR cartridge, they are probably the most overbuilt pistols in the history of firearms.

I'm sure the majority of them (with basic maintenance) will outlive all of us.

usp9
January 14, 2013, 01:45 PM
HK produced the MK23 to withstand harsh elements and abuse, more so than any other gun I've ever encountered.

tipoc
January 14, 2013, 01:51 PM
I once watched Mike Tyson eat a Glock.

This pissed off Chuck Norris so much he ate the slide of a 1911. But it was a Kimber so it was easy.

tipoc

bannockburn
January 14, 2013, 01:56 PM
Fishbed77

While the Ruger .22 autos are well built and fairly tough in terms of their design and construction, the OP was looking for something chambered in a caliber between a .380 and a .45. I still believe some sort of pistol designed primarily for military use would have to be the baseline when looking for the toughest most rugged pistol. Some others that come to mind would be the M1911, the Walther P-38, the Glock 17, the MAB PA-15, and the Star Model 28.

klyph
January 14, 2013, 02:14 PM
Ingram's MAC line of pistols, obviously. You could jam a piece of hickory in the magwell and use it as a sledgehammer. Ridiculously overbuilt and heavy.

jmr40
January 14, 2013, 02:24 PM
Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function. The only requirement is that it be semi automatic and chambered in something from .380 to .45acp.

This meets most of your requirements.

http://theprepared.com/content/view/90//administrator/

saltydog452
January 14, 2013, 02:24 PM
A single shot 45-70 ought to be in consideration.

salty


EDIT: The 45-70 doesnt fit in the box as defined by post # 1.

littlebluevette
January 14, 2013, 02:28 PM
delete

JTQ
January 14, 2013, 02:52 PM
This meets most of your requirements.

http://theprepared.com/content/view/90//administrator/
No doubt he's seen that, and it is the source for the OP's original question.

BigG
January 14, 2013, 03:23 PM
Luger P08?

jr_watkins
January 14, 2013, 03:30 PM
Ruger P89 series are as you describe.

Jaymo
January 14, 2013, 03:34 PM
If not for the caliber requirements, I'd say Desert Eagle. It's not built like a tank, it IS a tank. Even weighs the same as an M1 Abrams.

verdun59
January 14, 2013, 03:36 PM
I'll go with post #2 and have a Bud to go with it.

XD 45acp
January 14, 2013, 03:50 PM
Sledgehammer ???? They ALL lose....

carbonyl
January 14, 2013, 04:31 PM
Disregarding dogs chewing on the poly handle and sledge hammers wouldn't a P95 be one of the tougher ones?

klyph
January 14, 2013, 04:59 PM
Another good stress test is a high heat endurance test. Can the gun function after being left on a woodstove overnight or dropped into a fire for a certain time frame? Glock fanboys never include such tests in their "torture" testing for obvious reasons. I can think of many firearms that can survive such conditions.

ApacheCoTodd
January 14, 2013, 05:01 PM
I don't much like the pistol nor the regime that made it but I do respect the TT33.

What's tougher?

TarDevil
January 14, 2013, 05:06 PM
What do you consider to be the toughest, most rugged pistol ever made? Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function...
... and still group under 2" at 25 yards?

Seriously, "toughest, most rugged pistol ever made" doesn't worry me. Yeah, I want it to survive unscathed if I drop it, not rust if I wear every day, and not blow up in my hand, but mostly I want a gun that does what's expected when expected. I'm not gonna beat, squash, or bury my gun.

CPshooter
January 14, 2013, 05:25 PM
I know the H&K USP .45 is very tough and built to withstand a VERY high number of rounds without major parts breakage. I know OP had physical abuse in mind here, but if you consider the amount of abuse a handgun puts on itself during shooting, the H&K has to be one of the "toughest" overall.

csa77
January 14, 2013, 06:28 PM
Ruger MK or 22/45 series. outrageously overbuilt for the cartridge

in second is the slightly refined hi point, some people call it a glock

LeonCarr
January 14, 2013, 06:36 PM
I really like my Glocks but the Ruger P-Series are pretty tough.

Just my .02,
LeonCarr

el Godfather
January 15, 2013, 05:29 PM
Glock or H&K USP

TennJed
January 15, 2013, 05:50 PM
3rd Gen S&W's?
I have a Glock 19 and a S&W 5906. Both are would be good choices, but the Smith wins. A Makarov is in the discussion also

Fiv3r
January 15, 2013, 05:51 PM
Another vote for the TT-33 and its clones. My Chinese 9mm 54 is ridiculously stout. It doesn't outshoot my Glock, but I don't think a dog could eat it either.

rskent
January 15, 2013, 06:10 PM
Colt 1911
(you know, the ones that have a proper rattle when you shake um)

Roadking Rider
January 15, 2013, 09:13 PM
I'm going to agree with two other posters. CZ PO-1 and Ruger MK series of pistols.

meanmrmustard
January 15, 2013, 09:17 PM
Another good stress test is a high heat endurance test. Can the gun function after being left on a woodstove overnight or dropped into a fire for a certain time frame? Glock fanboys never include such tests in their "torture" testing for obvious reasons. I can think of many firearms that can survive such conditions.
Because they're unrealistic tests. There are better chances of a gun freezing or being submerged in some liquid or another than forgotten on a wood stove or dropped into a fire.

Unless, of course, an armed drunk desires to pitch his Glock into a bonfire.:rolleyes:

klyph
January 16, 2013, 01:52 AM
The impression that weapons are rarely subjected to high heat in combat situations is a mistaken impression.
Also, you can shoot an AK until the hand guard catches fire and shoot a Glock 18 until it melts. The difference is that the AK will keep running. IMO polymer guns are excluded from the running for toughest by default.

RSR
January 16, 2013, 01:56 AM
+1!!! 1911... Gimme carbon steel!

meanmrmustard
January 16, 2013, 07:44 AM
The impression that weapons are rarely subjected to high heat in combat situations is a mistaken impression.
Also, you can shoot an AK until the hand guard catches fire and shoot a Glock 18 until it melts. The difference is that the AK will keep running. IMO polymer guns are excluded from the running for toughest by default.
But you're comparing a fully automatic rifle to a machine pistol, either of which most of us will never own here in the states. So the materials they're made of are irrelevant to the discussion of semi auto loading sidearms.

Polymer crystallizes, not rendering it completely useless after high heat, either.

pockets
January 16, 2013, 08:10 AM
38 posts before the Makarov was mentioned? It's such a 'delicate flower' of a pistol.
After the world goes up, the only thing left will be cockroaches, armed with Makarovs and AKs.
.

CajunBass
January 16, 2013, 08:30 AM
Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer

I wouldn't expect a steel trailer hitch ball to work after beating it with a sledgehammer.

springer99
January 16, 2013, 10:45 AM
Makarov, any of 'em.

otasan56
January 16, 2013, 11:04 AM
Glock 17 or 19.

Elkins45
January 16, 2013, 11:23 AM
Ruger P89 series are as you describe.
I remember an article about these guns in one of the NRA mags shortly after they were introduced. Some of the things they did to their test guns were insane! Things like intentionally plugging the barrels and firing multiple rounds, making huge cuts in the slides, etc.

The ergos on those guns leaves a lot to be desired IMO, but you can't fault the engineering.

EDIT: I found a link with images from that article: http://thefiringline.com/forums/showpost.php?p=4016872&postcount=2

dbublitz
January 16, 2013, 08:57 PM
Ruger P90 or Makarov

Mooseman
January 16, 2013, 10:34 PM
I would think something along the lines of a bond derringer would be the toughest. Very little to the gun except thick barrel and frame with a small amount of moving parts. Mind you, the question wasn't about the best firearm, just the toughest:)

Ah, never mind, missed the semi auto part

Blue Brick
January 16, 2013, 11:46 PM
Ruger P-85, P89, P90, or P91

Mr.510
January 17, 2013, 04:53 AM
I would think a Glock or XD stand the best chance of surviving a "torture test". I say this because I've seen many torture tests carried out on both platforms and they both did very well. I have not seen a steel framed pistol survive the same abuse, mostly on the drop and run over tests because their frames can bend rather than flex and spring back. Yes, a polymer pistol can fail the dog test. I don't leave guns laying around for dogs to get hold of and I don't have a dog so this would be a relatively minor issue for me. Some guns are tougher than others with different forms of abuse and/or neglect. For my use and abuse polymer framed handguns ought to be the most durable. I agree with others that torture tests are pretty silly, but it is good to know I could do a face-plant at speed in the sand dunes on a quad and my XD full of sand would likely function as intended without cleaning or even racking the slide to get some of the sand out.

Shadow 7D
January 17, 2013, 05:31 AM
You can break anything, and if you ABUSE a machine, any machine, don't be surprised if it breaks. Better, MUCH better is to take care of what you got.

Pilot
January 17, 2013, 07:25 AM
Another vote for the Makarov.

Inebriated
January 17, 2013, 03:05 PM
I don't know if it's been said, but I will honestly put this up against any other pistol ever made...
http://cdn2.armslist.com/sites/armslist/uploads/posts/2012/03/04/325917_01_romanian_draco_pistol_640.jpg

CharlieDeltaJuliet
January 17, 2013, 03:25 PM
Ruger P90. They might be ugly but they are built like a tank. They handle +P+ammo like a champ...

Edit: had to call to ask which he shoots...
My buddy shoots 45 super in his not a +p+. I have never shot it but know he has put quite a few rounds through it. He specifically bought it for that. Said it was originally designed for a 10mm? Maybe? But Ruger changed it...so he says..

Babarsac
January 17, 2013, 03:32 PM
From what I've handled\owned in no particular order...

1911
Hi-Power
Makarov

CharlieDeltaJuliet
January 17, 2013, 09:33 PM
Sorry +p or p+ whichever

I have never shot them. My buddy swears by the hottest load you can get...I was going to try them but Sig does not recommend it and I won't try it in my Colt or Springfield. I only shoot Hornady Critcal Defense and or reloads.


Edit: nope sorry wrong again, 45super... I had to call him to ask...
I suppose my Sig isn't able to shoot these. I have no idea which is worse on it +p or super.

FMF Doc
January 17, 2013, 09:34 PM
Ruger P95

jaysouth
January 17, 2013, 10:06 PM
EAA TZ-75, tough as a tank and after carrying for a couple of hours, they also weigh as much as a tank.

sargents1
January 18, 2013, 04:21 PM
Glock vs. dog:

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t4/presto_z/IMAG1108.jpg

That was dog damage?:confused:...huh. I thought it was a stippling job.

BTW, my vote for toughest gun - Ruger metal frame P-Series.

dcarch
January 18, 2013, 05:38 PM
I'm sure the "right" answer is a Glock, but I'm going with an IWI Jericho just for the heck of it.

Hurryin' Hoosier
January 18, 2013, 10:23 PM
What do you consider to be the toughest, most rugged pistol ever made? Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function. The only requirement is that it be semi automatic and chambered in something from .380 to .45acp.
The Pistolet Makarova (commonly referred to as the Makarov). Not much for pretty, but built like a T34 tank!

jerkface11
January 18, 2013, 10:30 PM
Hard to beat the Ruger P series for toughness.

Cosmoline
January 18, 2013, 10:45 PM
I'd vote for one of the European all-steel blowback pieces. I think the Makarov is probably right on the money. Very few moving parts, nothing complex inside, and in a small low-velocity caliber. All in all a very tough little piece.

JohnKSa
January 18, 2013, 10:45 PM
Glock vs. dog:With a pocket knife, in an emergency, I could get that gun up and running in less than 5 minutes by simply trimming away the damaged parts. Do that kind of damage to a metal frame pistol and you're going to need a machine shop to get the gun working--if it's even possible to make it work again.

That said, I think the original Ruger P-Series gun (pre P345), especially the 9mms, are probably sturdier than the Glocks....shoot a Glock 18 until it melts.This is something you think might be true, or you have some evidence proving that it can be done using standard ammunition feeding devices and some remotely reasonable round count?

There's a commonly cited test that involved putting 1000 rounds through a Glock in less than 14 minutes. While the recoil spring guide rod melted, the gun did not. Furthermore, it kept running even with the melted guide rod. Glock has, since then, changed the recoil spring guide rod material to make it more heat resistant.

redfisher43
January 18, 2013, 10:48 PM
Another Ruger P-89 vote.:fire:banghead:

Elkins45
January 18, 2013, 11:22 PM
With a pocket knife, in an emergency, I could get that gun up and running in less than 5 minutes by simply trimming away the damaged parts. Do that kind of damage to a metal frame pistol and you're going to need a machine shop to get the gun working--if it's even possible to make it work again.

A dog couldn't do that kind of damage to a metal framed gun.

JohnKSa
January 18, 2013, 11:43 PM
I believe you are correct. Of course, I didn't say, nor even imply that it could. What I said had nothing to do with how the gun got damaged. I merely pointed out that the gun in the picture could be returned to working condition in a couple of minutes with a pocketknife while a metal gun with similar damage would require tools to fix--assuming it could be fixed.

Hurryin' Hoosier
January 18, 2013, 11:52 PM
I believe you are correct. Of course, I didn't say, nor even imply that it could. What I said had nothing to do with how the gun got damaged. I merely pointed out that the gun in the picture could be returned to working condition in a couple of minutes with a pocketknife while a metal gun with similar damage would require tools to fix--assuming it could be fixed.
I don't think very many dogs could even gnaw through the bakelite grips on my Makarov - much less damage the steel frame.

JohnKSa
January 19, 2013, 12:01 AM
....

jon_in_wv
January 19, 2013, 12:14 AM
+1 for the Makarov. The Russians love to make tough weapons and I'll put the Makarov against anything for its toughness and reliability.

Note. Not the cheap FEGs or Polish stuff, honest to God Makarovs.

meanmrmustard
January 19, 2013, 08:07 AM
the Makarov is less powerful than the 38 special and the .38 is well proven to be feeble.
The round isn't in question, the platform that fires it is. While I agree there are better choices, I personally do not feel undergunned with either a CZ82 or a EG Makarov...

Either of which or pretty damn tough. Not my first choice of "the pistol that wouldn't die", but they're high on my list.

Elkins45
January 19, 2013, 10:09 AM
I believe you are correct. Of course, I didn't say, nor even imply that it could. What I said had nothing to do with how the gun got damaged. I merely pointed out that the gun in the picture could be returned to working condition in a couple of minutes with a pocketknife while a metal gun with similar damage would require tools to fix--assuming it could be fixed.
OK, and I agree, but what kind of apocalyptic event would be required to do that to a metal framed gun? Dragging it behind your bumper for two miles on a gravel road?

meanmrmustard
January 19, 2013, 03:03 PM
so somebody without real knowledge about the subject "doesn't feel undergunned", so what? many feel ok with a .25 Raven, too. Many millions of people, in fact.
I fail to see your point. If you're hinting at caliber choice, you've contradicted yourself.

I can purchase 9x18 ammunition that is more than suited to the task of HD/SD, not to mention being fired in only one of three platforms that can handle it. That's damned tough to fire Buffalo Bore +P.

The Mak is plenty tough. As stated, not my choice initially, but high on my list.

JohnKSa
January 19, 2013, 04:05 PM
OK, and I agree, but what kind of apocalyptic event would be required to do that to a metal framed gun? Dragging it behind your bumper for two miles on a gravel road?Crazy things happen to items that get carried around on a daily basis. For example, nobody in their right mind would let a pet play with a gun, or even leave one lying around where that might be a likely outcome, but I've even heard of a situation where a gun, while unattended, got chewed on by a dog. How crazy is that? ;)

And yes, guns do end up on the road, getting run over and generally banged around violently from time to time. In a situation like that, the grip-frame/mag well is the part of the gun that's the least supported and most likely to be deformed or suffer significant damage. The barrel/slide area are very sturdy compared to the grip frame/mag well area.

powder
January 19, 2013, 04:26 PM
What do you consider to be the toughest, most rugged pistol ever made? Tough as in beat it with a sledgehammer, run over it with a truck, bury it for 10 years and still count on it to function. The only requirement is that it be semi automatic and chambered in something from .380 to .45acp.

The only realistic aspect of that for me is a 10 year burial, would be done in an air-locked plastic bag, and then put into a tupper-ware like plastic container sealed with duct tape.

Sledgehammers and vehicle run overs? Steel: 1911s or the 3rd gen Smiths.

klyph
January 19, 2013, 07:03 PM
If the thread is about "toughest, most rugged" then a plastic chew toy is right out. Glocks are great guns, but not the toughest, most rugged. Not by a long shot. What if poochy had chewed off the trigger? Your pocket knife isn't gonna fix that.

weblance
January 19, 2013, 08:27 PM
The Ruger P Series is one of the toughest pistols made. When they were doing development on the P85, Ruger had 3 employees doing firing torture tests to see how many rounds could be fired until there was a parts breakage. When those 3 guys eventually died of old age, Ruger put 3 new guys in that job and it took hundreds of thousands of rounds before the $2 extractor broke on one of the pistols. The died of old age comment was a joke, but the hundreds of thousands of rounds comment is true.

Elkins45
January 19, 2013, 11:16 PM
And yes, guns do end up on the road, getting run over and generally banged around violently from time to time. In a situation like that, the grip-frame/mag well is the part of the gun that's the least supported and most likely to be deformed or suffer significant damage. The barrel/slide area are very sturdy compared to the grip frame/mag well area.

I know you are going to think that I'm lying about this, but I promise that I am not. My house was burglarized in 1991, before I owned a gun safe. The thieving bastards stripped my pillowcases and used them to collect my stuff. My bedside gun at the time was a Springfield Armory 1911 and it got dumped into a pillowcase with a bandolier of shotshells and some other stuff I don't remember. Someone saw them carrying stuff out and so they left in a hurry. The pillowcase with the 1911 fell out of the bed of their truck when they drove off and it landed in the middle of the road. One of the responding police officers spotted in in the middle of the highway and brought it into the house. It had been run over a number of times because the pillowcase was torn and most of the shotgun shells were popped open and oblong.

The 1911 had a new scratch on the slide. It was still cocked and locked. The police took it as evidence and dusted it for prints.

When I got it back some months later it had been unloaded. I filled up the mag, racked the slide and let fly. It functioned perfectly and still does 20+ years later. So I have crossed "run over it repeatedly" as one of the ways to break a 1911.

JohnKSa
January 19, 2013, 11:28 PM
What if poochy had chewed off the trigger?"What if...?" Is fun because you can make it into anything you want, even if no one has ever heard of it happening and even if it's not really plausible.Glocks are great guns, but not the toughest, most rugged.I tend to agree that they're not at the absolute top of the list, however it's not because they have plastic frames that can melt if you put them in a fire or because if you give them to a dog it can break them, it's because the coiled trigger return springs break now and then and because the stock front sights loosen up if you do a lot of holster work with them....into a fire for a certain time frame...By the way, your idea of testing guns by putting them in a fire is problematic--it will ruin any gun.

1. Many metal-framed guns have plastic parts, and if you melt those parts, the guns will become non-functional. Even guns that are all-metal in every other respect often have plastic magazine followers and floorplates.

2. If the gun gets tested in the loaded state, the rounds going off in the magazine are almost certainly going to cause something to break.

3. Even if you can find a gun that is truly all metal--no plastic at all in any part of the gun or magazine--and even if you put it in the fire unloaded, it will still be ruined. At best, the springs will lose their temper and that will cause it to cease to function, at worst, critical parts of the gun can be weakened to the point that a catastrophic failure results if the springs are replaced and the gun is fired.

Besides, you need to look at the big picture. Every gun I'm aware of has at least one weakness that can be used to easily render it non-functional. If your goal is to rule out one particular gun or class of guns, you can focus on that single feature to the exclusion of all others to try to "make your point".

Or, you can look at the big picture and compare the various contenders on a more even playing field if you really want to learn something.

Depends on your goal, I guess.So I have crossed "run over it repeatedly" as one of the ways to break a 1911.Well, if you want to be totally accurate, you crossed out "being dropped on the road and possibly run over" as a way to break a 1911. There's no way to tell if, or how many times it was run over even if you can verify some of the other objects got run over more than once.

Besides, I have no problem believing that a 1911 (or virtually any gun for that matter) could survive being run over without functional damage. That's not at all the same thing as saying they CAN'T be damaged by being run over. It all depends on a number of things.

I had my foot run over many years ago and was totally uninjured. The car was small and the tire didn't get far enough up on my instep to smash things flat. But I'm certainly not going to state that my feet are impervious to injury from being run over on the basis of that experience.

Auto426
January 20, 2013, 03:09 AM
Am I the only one that finds it funny that the OP posts a clearly loaded question, and then doesn't even reply to any of the answers in the thread?

ba ba booey
January 20, 2013, 08:06 AM
i guess that is a little funny

meanmrmustard
January 20, 2013, 09:03 AM
Am I the only one that finds it funny that the OP posts a clearly loaded question, and then doesn't even reply to any of the answers in the thread?
How's it loaded?

Walking Dead
January 20, 2013, 09:05 AM
When y'all figure out what handgun manufacturer uses this testing criteria let me know.

JohnBT
January 20, 2013, 09:13 AM
When Ruger introduced the -Six series centerfire revolvers their sales reps were known to demonstrate the toughness of the design by tossing them around the range, driving over them and then shooting targets with them.

John

meanmrmustard
January 20, 2013, 09:13 AM
When y'all figure out what handgun manufacturer uses this testing criteria let me know.
I think OP was being facetious. I could be wrong.

bannockburn
January 21, 2013, 12:33 PM
JohnBT

I remember a similar story years ago concerning the then new Security Six and Bill Ruger. As the story goes Mr. Ruger wanted to show off his latest revolver design to a select group of people before the gun was actually introduced. So they took a Security Six frame, placed it in a remote firing machine rest, screwed in a solid barrel blank, and proceeded to fire six proof loads through it. They then replaced the solid barrel with a regular barrel and fired another six proof loads. The gun functioned perfectly without any damage being done to the frame or the cylinder.

Of course I have no way of knowing if any of this ever occured but I did think at the time, given the overall design and solid construction of the Security Six, that there was a certain amount of plausability to the story.

Ky Larry
January 21, 2013, 01:46 PM
I'd say the 1911 .45 ACP. It's been tested in every climate in the world for over 100 years under tougher conditions than any civilian will likely encounter. If it can survive sevice in Mexico,Hondurus, Saipan,Sicily, North Africa, Tarawa, France. Korea, and Viet Nam just to name a few, then it will probably stand up to anything you or I do to it.

jimherb
January 21, 2013, 04:23 PM
I couldn't say for sure--but I'll bet it's a Ruger.

otasan56
January 22, 2013, 09:23 AM
In my case - I hope that it is my G17. It is my only defensive handgun other than an M1911A1 .45 ACP.

fatcat4620
January 22, 2013, 11:48 AM
Most modern combat handguns are more rugged then their owner. So unless you are a superhero you will die before your handgun does (that includes being chewed on by a dog or tossed into a fire)

JohnBT
January 22, 2013, 09:53 PM
" So they took a Security Six frame, placed it in a remote firing machine rest, screwed in a solid barrel blank, and proceeded to fire six proof loads through it. They then replaced the solid barrel with a regular barrel and fired another six proof loads. The gun functioned perfectly without any damage being done to the frame or the cylinder."

I've heard that from a couple of different people and read it in one or two articles.

hak
January 22, 2013, 11:13 PM
if you don't plug the 'backstrap' of your glock

http://www.glockforum.com/images/1/0/8/9/6/18161-glock-plug-22.jpg

it will perform a lot less magically than you think it will in your torture tests and environmental exposure.

that's the glock kryptonite.

If you enjoyed reading about "toughest most rugged pistol ever made" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!