Gunsite Scout - What For?


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Triumph
January 17, 2013, 02:05 PM
Guys - Not trying to be provocative just curious.

I don't get the LER scopes & why they are beneficial.
I also don't get the short barrel on a the Scout .308s.

I understand the gun is supposed to be
light but it seems to me you give away the long shot capabilities
of the .308 with the short barrel.
So if the Scout is for 200 yards & closer, why not a 30-30 with Hornady
Lever evolution.

If I read correctly the Gunsite Scouts were also designed
to be used for self defense in a pinch. It seems
the 30-30 is much faster at follow-up shots.

Please educate me. I think the Ruger Gunsite Scout
is neat, just not sure what it gets me that I don't already
have.

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Sam1911
January 17, 2013, 02:20 PM
Probably nothing. It's a concept for a specific flavor of "do-all" rifle, trading heavily on the luster of Col. Cooper's name attached to the idea.

If you have another rifle, or even a modest collection of rifles, you probably have all the bases covered the Scout is supposed to do. It's really quite an interesting phenomenon just how many different rifles and kinds of rifles we all can be persuaded to buy, considering how very comprehensively their capabilities overlap in many cases.

Here are some threads on the concept: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=687569

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=675662

adelbridge
January 17, 2013, 02:53 PM
I do like long eye relief scopes because you can shoot with both eyes open. Shooting with both eyes open could be practical in dangerous situation. You give up about 10 minutes of usable daylight with a long eye relief scope vs typical 3.5" eye relief scope of similar make and model which is when most game animals show themselves. The other benefit of the GSC is the threaded barrel for suppressed shooting. Its a good gun but in the end it is a 2012 version of a 1898 battle rifle.

cal30_sniper
January 17, 2013, 03:30 PM
Even out of a short barrel, the .308 Win still has much more effective range than a .30-30 Win. I like levers a lot, but .30-30 doesn't hold a candle to .308 in ballistics.

I think a better question might be why do so many people insist on scoping lever action .30-30s. I could see scoping a scout rifle in .308 to give some extra range, but if you've got the ballistics of a .30-30, you can see anything you're capable of hitting and killing just fine with the naked eye.

rcmodel
January 17, 2013, 03:31 PM
It seems the 30-30 is much faster at follow-up shots.But it isn't.

A good man with a bolt-action will cycle the bolt before the gun comes back down from recoil.

And the Scout with a 20-round mag will do it almost three times longer without stopping then a 30-30 with a 7-round mag.

rc

cal30_sniper
January 17, 2013, 03:32 PM
That being said, I really don't see the need for a LER scope in a rifle. Personally, I prefer either a SER scope, iron sights, or if you have to have forward mounted optics, a red-dot type setup. For a quick handling rifle, it's almost impossible to beat a holographic-style sight.

Girodin
January 17, 2013, 03:54 PM
but it seems to me you give away the long shot capabilities
of the .308 with the short barrel.


How far do you want to shoot? I've seen 18" barreled guns shooting absurdly long ranges that are much much further than most people can shoot. I've shot my own 16" guns out to 600'. Sure if your focus is long range shooting then the longer barrel and every bit of velocity is nice. However, a 16" scout gun still has the legs to reach out to distances beyond what most shooters can make use of. Thus, if the focus is not long range, the weight and size advantage of a 16" gun might make a lot of sense.

baz
January 17, 2013, 04:07 PM
And the Scout with a 20-round mag will do it almost three times longer without stopping then a 30-30 with a 7-round mag.Where can I find 20 round mags for the GSR?

urbaneruralite
January 17, 2013, 04:13 PM
I bet you could find that the Ruger bolt action feeds more reliably than the lever gun. The LER scope would be beneficial if you fed with stripper clips or ran a sight for co-witness.

I would rather ask: "why .308 or why a barrel less than 20"?"

rcmodel
January 17, 2013, 04:15 PM
Excuse me.

I guess they are 10-round mags.

rc

baz
January 17, 2013, 04:19 PM
I happen to like the scout rifle concept because with a LER scope I can shoot right handed though left eye dominant. As for the short barrel length, you might find this article (http://www.tacticaloperations.com/swatdec2000/index.html) insightful.

psyopspec
January 17, 2013, 04:29 PM
Probably nothing. It's a concept for a specific flavor of "do-all" rifle, trading heavily on the luster of Col. Cooper's name attached to the idea.

I agree with this. I've wanted a scout rifle built to the COL's specifications for some time, but it's perpetually on the bottom of my list because it doesn't actually do anything other guns in my safe couldn't. But I still think it's a neat idea for a swiss-army type rifle.

R.W.Dale
January 17, 2013, 04:38 PM
Your mistake is to assume a 20" 30-30 has performance anywhere similar to a 16" 308

A 16" 308 has the power to hit targets and kill game well out past what most people can shoot and is still a 300yd ++ deer round




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Float Pilot
January 17, 2013, 05:47 PM
Back when I worked in the bush villages I always had two or three model 94 Winchesters in my shop because the local indigenous personnel would get excited while poaching a moose and jam up the M-94 action with a cartridge trapped in the lever mechanism. So I would get the knock on the door followed by ' Don't shoot White Cop, my rifle is stuck again." They called me "White Cop" because is was too hard to say my name without any front teeth and a fierce hang-over.

Lever actions like the M-94 do not do so swell when full of river silt, dust , mud and rust.
One reason they were never very successful as military weapons. A good military style bolt action is much easier to maintain in the field, particularly without tools. Nobody ever came over to have me un-jam a Model 70.

Col Cooper was into the idea of a short rifle which would handle in close quarters and heavy brush like a carbine, yet still be able to engage targets out to 300 meters when the terrain opened up. Thus the Scout Scope option... The same reason the military eventually went to a similar placement for battle optics on the M-4

Vern Humphrey
January 17, 2013, 05:56 PM
Lever actions like the M-94 do not do so swell when full of river silt, dust , mud and rust.
One reason they were never very successful as military weapons.
Another reason is, once the magazine is empty, it's slow to reload. The Russian Army in WWI bought the M1895 Winchester, with its box magazine, and specified it have a clip slot, so it could be reloaded as fast as a bolt rifle.

Which, by the way, is one reason for the LER scope on the Scout Rifle -- so it can be reloaded with stripper clips.

Float Pilot
January 17, 2013, 06:11 PM
That is why I think a 1903 actioned short rifle in 30-06, 338-06 or 35 Whelen , would be a slick scout rifle with a Scout Scope and stripper clips.
The same goes to a converted Enfield. Either 308 or 303...

jmr40
January 17, 2013, 08:30 PM
The Ruger version of the scout rifle is way overweight. Cooper envisioned a LIGHTWEIGHT rifle that could be used primarily as a survival rifle. Hunting most game animals and for SD in a pinch. It was never meant to be a primary combat rifle. Or as a primary hunting rifle

According to his criteria an optic was optional. He did want quality iron sights. He prefered the forward mounted scope (if the user chose to use optics) primaily because he wanted to be able to quicky reload bolt guns with stripper clips, not because it was better optically.

He did not say it had to be a bolt rifle, he felt a lever 30-30 was a viable option, but did prefer a bit more power and range that the 308 and similar rounds offered. Depending on the part of the world it would be used in. He liked the 375 Steyr for Africa, and the 7-08 for countries where military rounds are forbidden.

Cooper had a lot of good ideas, but his foward mounted scope was a dud. A low powered scope mounted conventionally is faster for up close shooting and much better for longer range shooting. This is by far the most commonly used set up used by the guys shooting in the 3 gun competitions where fast shooting at a variety of ranges from very close to intermediate is required. A quality 1-4X scope offers around 5" of eye releif and is as easy to shoot with both eyes open as an EER scope or a dot sight.

Personally, I think a 18"-20" stainless Hawkeye with a 1-4X scope on it in QD mounts with irons as a backup would make a better scout rifle than the
Ruger scout offering. It would be lighter, cheaper, and with stainless metal and a synthetic stock. For it's intended use the added expense and trouble of the detachable mags would not be an improvement in my opinion.

Thus the Scout Scope option... The same reason the military eventually went to a similar placement for battle optics on the M-4

Extensive testing by the military has shown that a low powered scope mounted conventionally is the best option. The Trijicon ACOG is the most used opitc in the military. It is designed to be mounted on the receiver, not forward on the barrel.

This photo shows a typical military optical sight.

http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m513/jmr40/M4-afghanistan1_zps553b9b99.jpg

Boattale
January 17, 2013, 08:45 PM
Scout rifle is all about a short light bolt action battle rifle. Something that nobody needs or has real world utility with what's been developed since the advent of the M-16 and Ak 47. Cool enough to look at and debate about whats best for this or that with one, but still, really. Not all that good for anything. Other than dreaming about.

tomrkba
January 17, 2013, 08:50 PM
The forward mounted scope may be a dud, but the forward mounted rail is perfect for a red dot optic. I'd prefer that the rail was farther back so I could mount a variable scope, but that's the way it comes.

The reason I am even interested in it is because it is magazine fed, comes in both right and left handed configuration, includes a rail, and has a muzzle attachment. It's about time a company offered a bolt action rifle with these features.

FMF Doc
January 17, 2013, 09:01 PM
From what I understnad of it, the scout style scope, also called Intermediate Eye Relief (IER) of Long Eye Relief (LER) is supposed to allow the shooter to shoot keeping both eyes open, but still provide the necessary magnification and aiming reticle. As for the chambering, .308 is still a great all around choice. The 30-30 is not a bad choice, but it lacks the power required for the largest of game, like the brown bears. As for barrel length, it isn't a huge issue. The .308 is not perticularly sensitive to barrel length as compared to others. 16 is a bit short, but it is still effective. I would have liked to see 18 inches with a more reasonalbe flash-hider. I will add, however, that if you plan to run a supressor on the Ruger Scout, it is a whole new game. Lastly, the great Col. Coopers idea called for a detachable magazine, in line with the duel role of a scout in noth hunting and military. I am not the authority, but I have done exhaustive research on not only this rifle, but the history and concept of the sout rifle. Take it for what you will.

Float Pilot
January 17, 2013, 09:03 PM
In my last unit we only had Aim Point red dot type sights on our M-4s besides the folding sights. Ok for closer range reflex shooting... You could see what was going on around you much better with both eyes open. A few of us brought along private purchase tele-optics.

I have a Shorty M-1A (no wait that was lost in a fishing boat sinking) way I put a Scout Scope mount onto way back when the Idea came out.... It has never proved useful

conrad427
January 17, 2013, 09:05 PM
I was under the impression that the ruger was not the rifle the good COL. had in mind at all. Wasn't the styer scout with the much larger round more what he had in mind anyway? Seems like a good rifle for something, i guess. As far as scopes, i always shoot any type of sighting system with both eyes open regardless of LER SER NER whatever. Dont most people do as well? Or am I a weird-o?

Art Eatman
January 17, 2013, 09:08 PM
What was found in shoot-and-scoot competitions at Gunsite was that the forward mount scope allowed faster acquisition of a target. People with Scout rifles, once available, won the matches.

Cooper did not intend that the rifle substitute as a regular combat weapon. A scout who gets into such a situation has already failed in his basic mission--which is to go find out, remain unseen, and report back.

R.W.Dale
January 17, 2013, 10:08 PM
If you put the 30-30 in a bolt action, like the Savage or Remington 788, and load it up to its potential with a spitzer bullet, a 20" 30-30 will actually outperform a 16" 308, using factory ammo in the latter. I dont give a hoot for any 30-30, understand, just stating the ballistic facts of the matter.

Having owned both rifles I can say unequivocaly that this is pure fantasy.

A 340 with its slow slow barrel loaded to "full potential " is a bomb and the 788 has no magazine space (see pic)


110g vmax
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y96/krochus/MAS36/6cd7e344.jpg

There is not a bbl length made that will make a 30-30 match even a 16" 308




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ECVMatt
January 17, 2013, 10:27 PM
I have always been curious about scout rifles, but the price of building one kept them out of my reach. When Ruger intro'd this rifle I was able to pick it up for less than $800 OTD. I was skeptical of the scout scope concept, but have come to embrace it on this rifle. I live near desert where we can shoot as far as we like. It is very easy to get some pretty long hits with this rifle and the speed up close is good enough to take out jack rabbits on the run (not all the time, but I am getting better). I like to take it out there because we might camp in a canyon that is only a few yard wide and then go out onto the open desert for 4x4'ing. This rifle is able to provide security in all these situations. I love my Marlin 336's, but they just can't reliably preform and distances past 200 yards for me and that is streching it. My scout rifle is easily good to go out to 400. I will admit that it takes some getting used to, but for some it works out great.

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 01:16 AM
If you put the 30-30 in a bolt action, like the Savage or Remington 788, and load it up to its potential with a spitzer bullet, a 20" 30-30 will actually outperform a 16" 308, using factory ammo in the latter. I dont give a hoot for any 30-30, understand, just stating the ballistic facts of the matter.

You do realize that a maximum load 150grn .30-30 coming out of a 24" barrel is only moving about 2300 fps. A .308 150 grn bullet is running somewhere in the mid 2900 fps coming out of the same length barrel. You're talking the difference between a 40,000 psi cartridge and a 60,000 psi cartridge with a much larger case capacity.

The .30-30 probably loses almost as much velocity going from 24" to 20" as the .308 loses going from 24" to 16". Heck, lets put it into perspective here. There's 200fps more difference between the .30-30 and the .308 than there is between the .308 and a .300 Win Mag. You're in a completely different class of cartridges, not comparable at all.

I like .30-30 just as much as the next guy, and have a rack of 94s chambered for it back home. Just keep in mind that it's only slightly more powerful than a 7.62x39, and really isn't suitable for shooting anything outside of 200 yards. Even inside of 200, you better make sure what you're shooting isn't biting back.

Art Eatman
January 18, 2013, 11:54 AM
cal30, in a modern bolt-action, the .30-30 can be loaded to the same pressure as a .308. :) (Not that I'd bother, you understand.)

But let's get back on-topic, which is the Scout rifle.

Cooper's idea was centered on the .308. He later considered a larger-bore cartridge, but I disremember the details. :)

Anyhow, short and handy, seven pounds total weight and fast acquisition of a target all make sense to me as a concept. Arguing over relatively minor details seems sorta nit-picky. No law against picking nits, of course, but I don't get all emotional over them.

Auto426
January 18, 2013, 12:05 PM
I personally like the Gunsite Scout rifle, particularly the full stainless variant with the 18" barrel. I guess I'm just different though, since traditional hunting bolt actions don't really turn me on. For one, I like my bolt gun to have iron sights, and that's something you won't find on the majority of bolt guns (that arent mil-surps) out there. I also like the idea of the removable magazine.

I plan on eventually getting one of the new stainless Gunsites as a general purpose rifle. It can cover a number of different situations well, and I just have an itch for a nnice newiron sighted bolt gun that I need to scratch.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 12:58 PM
Personally, I think a 18"-20" stainless Hawkeye with a 1-4X scope on it in QD mounts with irons as a backup would make a better scout rifle than the
Ruger scout offering. It would be lighter, cheaper, and with stainless metal and a synthetic stock. For it's intended use the added expense and trouble of the detachable mags would not be an improvement in my opinion.

If you check Ruger's website the only sub 22" offering
I see is the Compact (16").

2 years ago they had the Compact Magnum in .308
with Iron sights and a 20" barrel. Only problem is its wood & not
Synthetic.

I also like the Savage 10 FCM Scout. .308 with 20.5" barrel and iron sights.

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 01:08 PM
cal30, in a modern bolt-action, the .30-30 can be loaded to the same pressure as a .308. :) (Not that I'd bother, you understand.)


Art, I've got a question about that. Please understand that I'm not trying to argue needlessly, and I don't want to get too far off topic, but I really don't know what the right answer to this question is.

Wouldn't the .30-30 still have to be loaded to lower pressures due to the design of the brass casing? It is my understanding that high PSI cartridges such as .270, .308, .30-06, .257 +P, etc., have a thicker cartridge case near the base to help deal with the higher pressures safely. It is my understanding that you need both a strong action to keep from blowing up in your face (and a good gas redirect in case a primer punctures, blows out, or a case head separates), as well as a strong enough brass casing to actually hold the pressure without head separation. I may be wrong, but that's the way I've always understood it. If that's the case, then no, you wouldn't be able to load a .30-30 to .308 pressures, even in a modern bolt action.

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 01:11 PM
Also, Art, I'd agree on the heavier caliber. If you're going to shoot at closer ranges, I think you'd be much better served by something like the .358 Winnie. It loses a lot of the range of the .308, but hits a lot harder in close.

Then again, I've always wanted to build one in a 9x57 (with a modern .358 bore instead of the European .356). I think that would be the perfect use for a Mauser action turned into a Woods/Scout rifle. I believe I'd use receiver mounted peep sights though. No need for a scope with a trajectory like that.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 01:15 PM
My point was not to argue the ballistics
of .308 vs 30-30.

I made reference in my original post that I
was referring to 200yards or less. If the Scout
can reach further, with the 16" barrel, and you can see
what your aiming at, with a 2-7 LER scope, then
it has a place.

If I am in brush with various sub 200 Yard openings
I'd probably grab the 30-30. If in more open tundra then
the Scout would have a place.

I still wonder if I wouldn't prefer the Ruger Compact
Magnum .308 (20" barrel). Or the Savage 10 FCM (20.5" barrel)
with a quick detach scope. Both rifles have iron
sights.

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 01:32 PM
Triumph, one of the answers to your original question is the difference in ballistics. Is a lever action .30-30 more handy in the brush? To most people, perhaps. Does the .30-30 have anywhere near the punch of a .308? Absolutely not.

The idea of the scout is a high-powered rifle in a handy, quick handling package. A .30-30 will do just fine against deer or other thin skinned game inside of 200 yds (although 200 is beginning to push it with a .30-30, IMO). If you have the potential of running into bigger stuff, or something capable of getting nasty if you wound it, I'd much rather have a .308.

Also keep in mind, the .308 moves a lot faster, even inside of 200 yards. If you're shooting at things that aren't sitting still, that extra velocity might be the difference in a hit or miss. It's a lot easier to lead with a faster bullet.

Those are the reasons that a .308 scout bolt gun exist, to fill the role better than a .30-30 lever could possibly hope to. It's in about the same weight and handling class, but hits with a much more potent cartridge. You could always compromise and get a Savage 99, but I think you'll find it no faster to work the action on one of those than a bolt gun. Somebody with some bolt action practice can be very fast.

Queen_of_Thunder
January 18, 2013, 01:42 PM
Its going to be an excellent hog rifle for West Texas. I would have one now but I'm broke.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 01:43 PM
The idea of the scout is a high-powered rifle in a handy, quick handling package. A .30-30 will do just fine against deer or other thin skinned game inside of 200 yds (although 200 is beginning to push it with a .30-30, IMO). If you have the potential of running into bigger stuff, or something capable of getting nasty if you wound it, I'd much rather have a .308.

Also keep in mind, the .308 moves a lot faster, even inside of 200 yards. If you're shooting at things that aren't sitting still, that extra velocity might be the difference in a hit or miss. It's a lot easier to lead with a faster bullet.

Got it - Good points

I still wonder if I wouldn't prefer the Ruger Compact
Magnum .308 (20" barrel). Or the Savage 10 FCM (20.5" barrel)
What do you think of these two as alternatives, with a little more barrel?

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 01:47 PM
Its going to be an excellent hog rifle for West Texas. I would have one now but I'm broke.


Of course if one of the Hogs starts chasing you drop the Scout, pull out your 45 ACP AND EMPTY THE CLIP! :D

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 01:58 PM
Triumph, I'm a big fan of the Savage rifles due to their interchangeability and low cost. I'd probably pick it out of the two. Simplicity would probably be better in that case.

Then again, if I was going to have something like that, I'd use a Mauser. If you could get an 8mm Mauser, cut the barrel down around 18" or so, grab a good used sporter stock, and put peeps on it, you'd be set. The 8x57 will hit harder than a .308, the action is a lot more rugged than the Savage, it will probably be cheaper, and it has the cool factor. I'd even go for a straight bolt model. That straight bolt can be lighting fast if you know what you're doing.

My personal brush/scout gun is a 6.5x55 M94 Swedish Mauser that's been sporterized. Williams peeps, 16.5" barrel, walnut sporter stock with a straight comb and pistol grip. I love the lightweight and quick handling of the small ring, and recoil is pretty light. I'd carry it anywhere in the lower 48. If I was headed to Canada or Alaska, I'd probably want a 8x57/.30-06 or better. However, I think as long as you aren't actively hunting big bears, a .308 class cartridge will do just fine.

Forget the .45 if the hogs charge though, I'm grabbing the 10mm, haha.

mac66
January 18, 2013, 02:48 PM
With all due respect to Col. Cooper (I loved the guy) the scout concept was an exercise in mental masturbation. He took a concept and expanded it and tried different things. He never really got it where he wanted it because it really didn't do anything better than a conventional rifle.

Had the idea been thought of in 1915, it may have been the ultimate rifle. In this day and age it is somewhat of an archaic and romantic notion of the glory days of bolt actions.

Having said that, I think it is good to push the parameters of design and function even if it is old technology. It was a fun and interesting concept to play around with. I built, owned or bought a number of scout rifles and while I like the compactness of them I never thought they did anything special.

Offfhand
January 18, 2013, 03:21 PM
Cooper's so-called Scout concept was nothing but a copy of an idea gun writer Pete Brown wrote about back in the 1960's. Attached is a photo of the cover of the 1966 Sports Afield Annual dated 1966, featuring Brown's "scout" rifle on the cover. Also an inside photo of Brown shooting the rifle. Years ago, when I was a newly graduated engineer working with experimental small arms at Aberdeen proving center, a long time engineer there told me that nothing is ever new in the gun world, and the older I get the more I believe what he said.

MK11
January 18, 2013, 03:47 PM
Someone on a forum (might have been here) said that the GSR wasn't a good execution of a scout rifle, but was a nice update of the Jungle Carbine idea.

That, to me, is the appeal, especially since I'm in a state likely to get hammered with EBR legislation. I've always wanted a Jungle Carbine, but never seen a real one in person (and price/availability of .303 is a non-starter).

henschman
January 18, 2013, 03:56 PM
When it came out I thought the Ruger GSR was kind of cool, but wasn't exactly what I would want in a scout rifle. The barrel was shorter than I like, it didn't take stripper clips, and I prefer a flush bottom rather than a protruding magazine for that type of rifle. I figured I could do better myself, for less money. So I bought a FR-8 Spanish Mauser:

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk201/henschman/guns/FR81.jpg

And did this to it:

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk201/henschman/guns/FR-8scout2_zps845fbaf3.jpg

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk201/henschman/guns/FR-8scout1_zps4cfe971c.jpg

The red dot is a Bushnell TRS-25. It has a lower 1/3 co-witness with the irons.

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk201/henschman/guns/FR-8scoutco-witness_zps5877668e.jpg

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/kk201/henschman/guns/FR-8scout3_zpsce5dfd1c.jpg

It cost $380 or so, all told. The FR-8 is already a great rifle for this application... the only things I had to add were the XS scout mount and the Fajen synthetic stock. The syn stock wasn't really necessary, but it shaved several ounces and kept me from having to mutilate the nice mil surp wood to work with my scout mount and sling setup. Plus it looks mean as hell in all black. I am a big fan of the red dot sight for this type of rifle. It keeps the rifle nice and light, it is quicker on target than any other type of sight, it works great in the forward mounted position (leaving the action clear for stripper clips), and if you mount it low enough, like mine, you can see the iron sights right through the tube, so you don't have to remove the optic to transition to irons if it goes T.U. on you.

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 04:09 PM
When it came out I thought the Ruger GSR was kind of cool, but wasn't exactly what I would want in a scout rifle. The barrel was shorter than I like, it didn't take stripper clips, and I prefer a flush bottom rather than a protruding magazine for that type of rifle. I figured I could do better myself, for less money. So I bought a FR-8 Spanish Mauser, and this is what I came up with:

The red dot is a Bushnell TRS-25. It has a lower 1/3 co-witness with the irons.

It cost $380 or so, all told. The FR-8 is already a great rifle for this application... the only things I had to add were the XS scout mount and the Fajen synthetic stock. The syn stock wasn't really necessary, but it shaved several ounces and kept me from having to mutilate the nice mil surp wood to work with my scout mount and sling setup. Plus it looks mean as hell in all black. I am a big fan of the red dot sight for this type of rifle. It keeps the rifle nice and light, it is quicker on target than any other type of sight, it works great in the forward mounted position (leaving the action clear for stripper clips), and if you mount it low enough, like mine, you can see the iron sights right through the tube, so you don't have to remove the optic to transition to irons if it goes T.U. on you.

IMO, that is a lot more practical rifle than the Rugers or Savages that have been discussed. It'll hold up to every bit of abuse that you could ever throw at it. Don't know if I personally would have gone with the red dot, but I like everything else. Good work.

henschman
January 18, 2013, 04:25 PM
Thanks! You are right, there is just no beating the Mod. 98 action for reliability. That was another factor that led me away from the commercial rifles.

Yeah, a lot of people miss having the magnification, but nothing beats a red dot up close, and that's where most shots take place. I have killed plenty of critters with iron sights, and a red dot beats irons in every way except durability (hence the co-witnessed irons).

My Dad was skeptical at first too (he is an old fart who can't see very well, and figured he needed the magnification), but once he got to shooting my AR with a red dot, he ended up putting one on his too.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 04:30 PM
Love it. Just not sure I could find a FR8!

henschman
January 18, 2013, 04:32 PM
They are out there. Try armslist and gunbroker.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 04:37 PM
What's a decent price right now?

RPRNY
January 18, 2013, 06:28 PM
I will not argue parity between the 30-30 and the .308 as the .308 is indeed a different class of cartridge in pressure, velocity and range. But at what point in the last hundred years did animals in NA begin growing armor? Because 170 gr RNSP traveling at @ 2,000 fps will kill anything in NA. And 150gr out any 30-30 lever gun will kill any deer at any range that more than 95% of hunters can hit a damn thing. If you are in the 5% that can ethically hunt outside 200 yds, then the 30-30 may not be for you.

musicman10_1
January 18, 2013, 06:51 PM
I really like my GSR. I do not have a safe full of modern rifles and so the GSR is great for me. Plus, it looks great!

http://i34.photobucket.com/albums/d139/musicman10_1/IMG_7317.jpg

MTMilitiaman
January 18, 2013, 07:15 PM
Man I ask, "what not for?" I was immediately impressed with the Ruger GSR, and plain tickled when I learned they offered it in left hand. It quickly jumped to the top of my list, but I never intended to use a forward mounted scope. I was thinking about putting this;

http://americancopmagazine.com/xs-scout-rifle-scope-rail/
http://www.tactical-store.com/ts-bu-rs-eltc67.html

on it...

I realize that gets kind of expensive, but the advantages of a good 1-4 or 1-6 power FFP scope with an intelligent reticle far outweighs any speed advantages the forward mounted optic may or may not afford. The primary advantage of the forward mounted optic as I understand it was that it allowed access to the receiver for a stripper clip mechanism to top the magazine off. The design of the Ruger magazine is apparently durable and reliable, but does not allow the use of stripper clips or afford any other mechanism to top the magazine off. They instead stick to a more popular and industry proven magazine design. This means a practical and available detachable magazine setup was more important to them than staying dead-on with Cooper's original design and using a stripper clip mechanism, even if it meant drastic alterations and/or propietary and less available technology, i.e a heavy modified M-14 magazine and/or a heavily modified Mauser action. I think this is a good bet on Ruger's part given that they obvously intend for this to be a versitile rifle appealing to a wide range of uses. I think Col. Cooper would begrudgingly accept it in the face of modern optical technology as well.

Were I to be able to scratch this one off "the list," I could envision it using for general big game hunting (deer/elk), truck rifle, as a backpacking rifle, and as a decent social rifle. It definetely would not replace my Mossberg for home defense, but if it ever moved to much across the driveway, I'd break it out. Other uses I could see it being used for given the opprotunity is as a dandy pig rifle, esp in areas where a suppressor and night vision set up would be more acceptabley viewed, or as a patrol/squad car trunk rifle in areas where assault rifles may not be favorably viewed by the community or in rural areas where the officer may be called on to handle both indigenous wildlife as well as personel. In some ways the GSR might be more considered a light tactical rifle more than a Scout rifle by strict Cooper definition, but I think I like it and Cooper would too.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 07:49 PM
I want to like it I really do.

I just don't get the LER scope. The least important criteria to Cooper was Self Defence so what's the need for LER scope & stripper clips. If that's even a possibility, or I'm worried about getting mugged by Zombies on a hunt, I'm grabbin an AR-10.

I get it that it's a cool rifle and I like Ruger. I'd rather buy one than try to hunt
down & modify an FR8 or 8x57 Mauser. Maybe I'll just get one & mount the scope on QD rings in the traditional spot. Seems to make more sense than the forward mounted LER scope.

Still wondering about the Savage 10FCM Scout & Ruger Compact Magnum .308 also. Both have iron sights.

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 08:13 PM
Other than the stripper clip thing, how about being able to work the bolt fast? Trying to work the bolt and busting your knuckles up against the scope/mount wouldn't be very conducive to speed. Having the scope up out of the way means you can get as fast as you want with the bolt without banging into things.

Just a thought, I've definitely noticed the difference in my scoped vs. unscoped rifles. LER scope should give the same speed and ease as a rifle without a scope at all.

Triumph
January 18, 2013, 08:40 PM
Cal30- Good Point.

How is the FOV on the LER scopes?

cal30_sniper
January 18, 2013, 09:01 PM
The Leupold IER scout scope is 2.5X and has a FOV of 22ft @ 100 yds. So, not the greatest, but it's supposedly easier to pick up your target because you can see more of the background leading up to it.

Personally, I would prefer a forward mounted red dot or holographic sight if I was going to go with any optics at all.

BruceB
January 18, 2013, 10:45 PM
My wife and daughter gave me a left-hand Gunsite Scout for Christmas 2011. I like it a great deal. Smooth action and nice trigger right from the factory.

Not subscribing to the forward-mounted scope theory, the Picatinny rail was removed within minutes of opening the box. A shooter who understands shooting with scopes knows that having both eyes open allows VERY fast target acquisition and a full field of view....especially if the sight happens to be of low magnification.

I once mounted a Weaver K1.5 on my .404 Jeffery, and I could see everything from the rear express sight forward...meaning, at least half of the barrel. It was like looking out a picture window, and I could easily have fired accurately at a target two feet off the muzzle.

On this GSR, I mounted a new Redfield 3-9X on the receiver, because of my decreasing visual capability, and at 3X I can still easily pick up moving targets at close range.

The absence of the stripper-clip feature doesn't bother me. magazine changes are fast, so I have one 3-round mag which fits almost flush for comfy carry, and several ten-rounders for serious shooting. (The polymer mags are VERY nice, and function well).

having killed many moose, bears and caribou with rifles of the same general energy class, this rifle would suit me just fine as an all-round hunting rifle AS WELL AS a "serious social accessory" if needed.

I seriously dislike the Ruger flash-hider, so it was removed and replaced with an L1A1 'hider from a British FAL-type rifle. The threads match, it's a better flash-hider.....and I can even even mount the FAL BAYONET if the deer get too aggressive...

It's a nice rifle. Not the very best for any specific job, but perfectly capable of filling virtually ANY need a man might have for a reasonably powerful rifle... and I believe THAT is the proof of Colonel Cooper's Scout concept and Ruger's execution of the same.

splithoof
January 18, 2013, 10:54 PM
Leupold also makes an IER Scout Scope in 1.5-5X with a 30mm main tube, and Fire-Dot reticle. As it is not in the regular catalog, you can see it at SWFA. They are the exclusive distributor. While it is a bit larger than the other more often cited 2.5X28, after using both on the same rifle I can say that the variable is for my uses much better. The new plastic 10 round mags are also much of an improvement. I have found this rifle is great for my ranch work, and easy to remove/replace in the Jeep really easily. I use the Leupold quick detachable rings so in the event the scope is damaged (unlikely) the transition will be possible in the field without tools. The short barrel also makes it much easier to remove from my saddle scabbard when I must make the rounds on a horse. In that case a five round mag fits closer with the bottom of the stock and will not snag.
I would have to say that the GSR is now my favorite rifle, and has done very well for my uses, which tend to be hard on gear. It so far has proven very durable, reliable, and accurate.

henschman
January 19, 2013, 12:36 AM
Triumph, I'd say anything under $350 would be a good deal on an FR-8.

tomrkba
January 19, 2013, 09:13 AM
I mentioned why I like it in a previous post. In the past, I could not find an affordable rifle that took a 10 round magazine. Some of the other comments have shown me additional benefits.

Let's talk about iron sights for this gun. I do not like the ones that come with it. I do know I really like Garand rear sights. Is it possible to mount something similar?

Captains1911
January 19, 2013, 09:36 AM
The forward mounted scope may be a dud, but the forward mounted rail is perfect for a red dot optic. I'd prefer that the rail was farther back so I could mount a variable scope, but that's the way it comes.


The GSR comes with rings that enable the mounting of a traditional scope directly to the receiver.

http://i38.photobucket.com/albums/e106/Captains1911/paper%20punchers/DSC01498.jpg

Paul7
January 19, 2013, 09:52 AM
Nothing a Scout can do an AR can't do better.

Certaindeaf
January 19, 2013, 09:59 AM
Buttstroke a rhino?

musicman10_1
January 19, 2013, 10:35 AM
Nothing a Scout can do an AR can't do better.
I'm not sure that I agree. YMMV

cal30_sniper
January 19, 2013, 10:39 AM
Is the receiver drilled for an aperture peep sight on the Ruger? That would make an awesome quick handling setup if you wanted to skip the scope/red dot. It'd be even faster with a large aperture, but you'd trade off some accuracy.

cal30_sniper
January 19, 2013, 10:42 AM
Nothing a Scout can do an AR can't do better.

1. Cost much less
2. Fire a .308 (unless you're talking an AR-10 variant, which is a much more expensive proposition with hard to find magazines)
3. Skip being meticulously cleaned and not jam
4. Get dropped in the sand/mud and not jam
5. Hunt something bigger than deer
6. Not get banned?

I'm sure there's more I'm missing, but there's a starter list.

SharpsDressedMan
January 19, 2013, 11:33 AM
I am often confused about people's lack of faith in a 2-3x Scout scope for long range. I have seen many shooters use metallic sights to make bullseye hits at 1000 yards at Camp Perry. I think a good man with a scout scoped, accurate rifle can easily do the same.

black_powder_Rob
January 19, 2013, 12:27 PM
AR can take anything short of elephant.
Just get into archery range and shoot carefully for the brain, it's not that hard, at all. The Scout is nothing special at all, and the Scout from Steyr was $2500, many years ago already. once the stupidity is over, AR's will fall back to below $700, just watch. There are millions of them. The anti's are not going to let you keep the bolt actions, either. they have not done so in any other country in the world, once you break weak, you lose all the guns

While I have admiration for the .223/5.56 I am not sure about your statement. I believe the scout does not have to get as close to animals to take them out or relie on a head shot. Trust me I know .223 will work on animals and I even use my Handi in .223 to hunt with but I have no illusions on what it can do. Also if no one has noticed Ruger also now has an 18" version too.

cal30_sniper
January 19, 2013, 12:59 PM
Just get into archery range and shoot carefully for the brain, it's not that hard, at all. The Scout is nothing special at all, and the Scout from Steyr was $2500, many years ago already. once the stupidity is over, AR's will fall back to below $700, just watch. There are millions of them. The anti's are not going to let you keep the bolt actions, either. they have not done so in any other country in the world, once you break weak, you lose all the guns.

Hahahaha. Right. Lets see you take your carefully aimed brain shot against a charging bear. There's a reason why dangerous game in Africa cannot be legally hunted with anything less than a .375 H&H or 9.3x62. Running angry beasts don't get brought down by .223s. This isn't Africa, and the dangerous game isn't as tough, but you're still going to need way more than a .223. .308 is not something I would choose to go hunting bear, but I won't feel helpless if I ran into one either.

A Ruger scout rifle does not cost $2500, they cost $1000. I agree that they are way overpriced new, that's why I suggested a cut down military bolt like a Mauser. However, even for a grand, it will still do many things that an AR won't.

valnar
January 19, 2013, 01:00 PM
I think it is bad enough we have 14.5" and 16" guns shooting .223, but to me a 16" barrel is too short for .308. Noise, blast, as well as loss of velocity.

For that reason, I built my own Scout'ish rifle. I started with a Tikka T3 CTR (20" heavy barrel) and did a CDI modified bottom metal so I could use 10rd AICS mags. I then added a 3x9 Zeiss Conquest and a Harris bipod. All is good.

Seventhsword
January 19, 2013, 01:03 PM
A Ruger scout rifle does not cost $2500, they cost $1000

Paid $749 shipped for mine... LOve this rifel!:D

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8205/8244883650_b45df390f4_b.jpg

cal30_sniper
January 19, 2013, 01:08 PM
I think it is bad enough we have 14.5" and 16" guns shooting .223, but to me a 16" barrel is too short for .308. Noise, blast, as well as loss of velocity.

For that reason, I built my own Scout'ish rifle. I started with a Tikka T3 CTR (20" heavy barrel) and did a CDI modified bottom metal so I could use 10rd AICS mags. I then added a 3x9 Zeiss Conquest and a Harris bipod. All is good.

The Ruger doesn't have a 16" barrel, it has an 18" barrel. Ideal for a rifle that you have to carry day in day out, especially in brush. You aren't losing much with that barrel length in .308.

Seventhsword, that's a great deal. I was just going off the MSRP. Good looking rifle.

Kramer Krazy
January 19, 2013, 01:11 PM
I seriously thought about getting a Gunsite....until I noticed the short barrel length. Instead, I'll stick to wanting an M77 Target in 308 for the use I want the gun for - long distance shots. I've had a Ruger M77 Target in 223 since 1994 that I love and have been wanting a 308 version to go with it for about 15 years. I predict having one in less than a year, if not for any reason than I have a bunch of nice 308 ammo with reloadable brass and my only 308 is an SAR-8 that destroys the case when ejecting it.

cal30_sniper
January 19, 2013, 01:46 PM
The point is not to go hunting bears. The point is to have a rifle that's handy enough to carry all day, and powerful enough to drop one if you should encounter it. It's not just bears either, there's lots of animals that are considered too large for a .223. Arguing with that is just nonsense. People have killed bears with a .357 Revolver and a bow and arrow too, but you bet your butt they had plenty of backup standing around with heavy caliber weapons just in case.

Many, many deer have been poached with a .22LR. That doesn't mean that .22LR is a good cartridge for hunting deer. There's also such a thing as killing humanely. Your chance of doing that with a .223 is not nearly as great as a .308.

And sorry, but a .223 SP is going to have virtually zero effect on an angry animal of any sort. Unless you manage to not only hit the spot where the brain would be, but also punch through to the brain (much harder to do with a .223). You need to deliver aimed energy for stopping power, not rapidly spraying nonsense.

You also don't get charged by animals that are already dead from being shot with an adequate round. You get charged by animals you pissed off by shooting with a caliber that was way too small to be using in the first place.

Do you see anyone roaming the backwoods of Alberta, British Columbia, the Yukon, and Alaska with a .223 AR? Nope. You sure see a heck of a lot of them carrying .308, .358, .30-06, and .35 Whelen bolt actions though. I rest my case.

Art Eatman
January 19, 2013, 01:59 PM
Getting away from bears and back to the subject: To repeat, for those hardheads who won't read through the first pages, the benefit of the forward-mounted scope is more rapid acquisition of a target.

This was proven in competition at Gunsite. Discussed thoroughly "back in the day" of Cooper's ownership there. Personally, I'm happy with the conventional mounting, but I have no argument with proponents of the forward mount.

valnar
January 19, 2013, 02:11 PM
The Ruger doesn't have a 16" barrel, it has an 18" barrel

The original ones did, and still do. I see now they came out with an 18" model, which was originally reserved for International shipments. It's good that Ruger listened to complaints (there were many regarding the 16" barrel).

xfyrfiter
January 19, 2013, 02:35 PM
A whole lot of Alaska and Canadian Native Americans carry and use ar15 for everything from bear, to caribou and moose. This is not saying that they always make a clean kill but they are subsistance hunters and don't miss much.

Triumph
January 19, 2013, 02:45 PM
Quote:
The Ruger doesn't have a 16" barrel, it has an 18" barrel
The original ones did, and still do. I see now they came out with an 18" model, which was originally reserved for International shipments. It's good that Ruger listened to complaints (there were many regarding the 16" barrel).

I'm confused. The international version was 18" with
No suppressor. Now the Ruger website shows a KM77GS that
is 18" and the show it with a suppressor. So, would that
be 18" + a couple more inches for the suppressor?

Auto426
January 19, 2013, 02:59 PM
I'm confused. The international version was 18" with
No suppressor. Now the Ruger website shows a KM77GS that
is 18" and the show it with a suppressor. So, would that
be 18" + a couple more inches for the suppressor?

When the Gunsite Scout was first introduced, the version intended for the American market had a 16" threaded barrel and a matte black finish. Ruger also built a version ment for export, that had a 18" non-threaded barrel and was made of stainless.

I'm guessing Ruger noticed the demand for the export version here in the states, so this year they introduced what is basically the export model just with the barrel threaded and a flash suppressor included. The flash suppressor adds a little length to the end up the gun, but only an inch or so.

CraigC
January 19, 2013, 03:14 PM
The LER scope allows for rapid target acquisition, as has been stated and ignored. It also allows for a boltgun to have both an optic and a receiver sight mounted and that is no small advantage. It's relatively short and light weight, which makes it handy. The short barrel is not a detriment for the purposes for which the rifle is intended. It ain't an F-class rifle and probably won't be found on beanfields and prairies but it was also never intended as such.

I didn't know that leverguns were so crappy or that the .30-30 bounces off 90lb deer until I read it on the internet. All the .308 gains you over the .30WCF is range. It's not better for bigger critters and it doesn't kill applicable critters any deader.

PS, the new stainless GSR has an 18" barrel.

http://www.ruger.com/products/gunsiteScoutRifle/models.html

RPRNY
January 19, 2013, 04:23 PM
I didn't know that leverguns were so crappy or that the .30-30 bounces off 90lb deer until I read it on the internet. All the .308 gains you over the .30WCF is range. It's not better for bigger critters and it doesn't kill applicable critters any deader.

Hear him!

I must say that I often find myself at odds with your views and assertions but this really could not have been better said.

Triumph
January 19, 2013, 05:18 PM
I didn't know that leverguns were so crappy or that the .30-30 bounces off 90lb deer until I read it on the internet. All the .308 gains you over the .30WCF is range. It's not better for bigger critters and it doesn't kill applicable critters any deader.

I spend most of my hunting time in the Texas hill country. 95% of the available shots are sub 200 yards. I use Hornady Leverevolution ammunition with the Leverevolition matched scope that has B&C mark for 200 yards. If I visit the other property, where the terrain opens up, I grab my son's Weatherby Vanguard Youth 7mm-08. Sometimes I grab the 7mm-08 for the wooded areas because we mostly stalk deer and it has a bipod. I love both the Marlin Texan 30-30 and the Weatherby Youth 7mm-08. Both are short, light and easy to maneuver.

I had a Ruger M77 300 WSM and have it to my brother because he is much more likely to go big game hunting.

If I were to get the Ruger Scout I would get 18" use the 5 round clip with a Harris Bipod. One advantage is I put the boys on there belly a bunch and they don't always remember to shoulder the gun and get scope eye. The LER scope would alleviate that problem. Don't think I need the Scout - but since when has that stopped me :D

sdj
January 20, 2013, 12:44 PM
I have been considering a Ruger Scout. I have seen a review (Nutnfancy, Youtube) where the accuracy is described as well, not that accurate. From among Ruger Scout owners here on THR, what have your experiences been? How would you describe the accuracy out say, to 400m and 500m, with Match ammo or high quality ammunition? I have handled the Ruger Scout, but have never fired one. Thanks in advance.

MTMilitiaman
January 20, 2013, 09:28 PM
Nothing a Scout can do an AR can't do better.

Whoa there, easy with the Kool Aid.

If you are primarily looking for a home defense rifle, the AR may be the better bet. If you are looking for a squirrel rifle, the AR might be a better bet. For pretty much everything else, the GSR is going to be the better option. The GSR is just as accurate, more powerful, and more reliable, so it easily offers twice the useful range of most ARs, and unlike the AR, you don't have to buy three different uppers for it to make it useful. For the price of an AR and a couple different uppers, you could get the GSR, scope it, and go to Gunsite to have legendary riflemen instruct you in its use. Think it about...

I know you guys like your poodle shooters, but come on guys. You don't have to drink the Kool Aid in every thread, do you?

TCBPATRIOT
January 20, 2013, 10:47 PM
I have been yearning for one since they first released it. My wallet however cannot support my family and my passion for firearms. But I will have one. I am the kind of person who doesn't want a gun for every purpose I don't hunt often enough or a wide variety of game and being a military guy I love .308 so this rifle seems it was built for me. Good at a few different things but not purpose built for any one certain task.

swag
January 21, 2013, 06:12 AM
I'm from Oz, where the flash hider is a banned item. Quite a few have been sold over here , nice enough looking guns, but if I'm walking down the line at the range, I won't choose to sit down next to one. I try to use hearing protection out hunting, given half a chance, though I'll let off a couple of .308 out of a 24 inch barrel no worries. Something would have to be heading towards me at a rapid pace with a serious frown to make me fire a scout without muffs.

breakingcontact
January 21, 2013, 11:55 AM
I like it.

Seems to have either hates or fans and not many with moderate opinions on it.

If you don't want to run the scope foreward, you don't have to.

Art Eatman
January 21, 2013, 12:08 PM
sdj, my only experience is at 100 and 200 yards with a forward mount low-power scope. My buddy's rifle. As near as I can figure, I'd call it basically a one-MOA rifle. Stock tweaking and handloads? Maybe a bit better, I don't know.

I hadn't given any thought to using it beyond 300 yards.

chicharrones
January 22, 2013, 09:01 AM
Guys - Not trying to be provocative just curious.

I've wanted one of these since it came out and I stumbled across one for sale a couple days ago. The price is a tad outrageous, but sometimes want supersedes all else. It does come with Ruger rings which is worth money right there.

Here's my take on it. With respect, forget the legendary Jeff Cooper and the highly esteemed Gunsite. Just look at the rifle itself.

If you want a currently made rifle in .308 that has factory installed aperture sights with the option of two styles of scope mounts and has a short overall length this rifle does have that going for it. With the flash hider removed and all the stock spacers removed, the Ruger GSR is only 36.5" long.

I'll admit, I dislike the standard issue steel 10 round magazine. Luckily, Ruger offers a polymer 10 round magazine that is 1" shorter, a polymer 5 round magazine that is 2" shorter, and a 3 round polymer magazine that is nearly flush with the bottom of the stock. If Ruger would keep the steel 10 round mag and issue a polymer 10 rounder and polymer 5 rounder instead, I think more Ruger GSR buyers would be happier. Me included. :)

Here's a new photo. I will try it out in this configuration as I await polymer magazines. Then I will probably remove the flash hider just to shorten it up. Or leave it on just to p.o. the anti-gunners out there. "OMG look at that evil black rifle", never mind the fact it's not an autoloader. :rolleyes:

http://www.lssdigital.com/lwpilot/r-gsr-3.jpg

chicharrones
January 22, 2013, 09:36 AM
BTW, It would be a neat if some manufacturer would make a handguard to bolt in place of that forward picatinny rail. That rail is right where I like to pick up a rifle.

Auto426
January 22, 2013, 09:54 AM
The rail is removable if you don't want to use it.

chicharrones
January 22, 2013, 04:00 PM
Of course.

What I mean is, if the rail is removed and a handguard was installed in the same location. Something made of wood, or polymer like the Mini-14 has, but made for the Ruger GSR. I tend to rust steel with my hands if I touch it often and a handguard would be eliminate that worry. I'm just used to grabbing mil-surp rifles by the handguard, wrapping my hand entirely around the gun.

sleepyone
January 22, 2013, 06:19 PM
This is all very interesting. I'm a bolt action guy. That's all I hunt with in .243 and .270. Love the mechanics and feel of working a bolt. I love lever actions too but want more range than those offer. On the other hand, I want higher capacity than standard bolt actions offer. I've been wanting to replace a Model 70 .30-06 and a Tikka .308 I sold a few years back with another .30 caliber. I like the concept of the Ruger GSR, mainly the 18" stainless barrel, 10 round mags, lefty version and also because I can mount a scope on the receiver in case I don't like the forward mounting option. It's good to know there are options available should the AR style rifles ad high cap mags get banned. I've had several AR-15s the past several years and just sold my last one, for a nice profit I might add! I never warmed up to them. I love the look and feel of good quality wood and a nice mauser-style bolt!

DATL
January 29, 2013, 12:40 AM
My .02 is that the Ruger GSR is just a good all around utility rifle. Of course there are many rifles better at taking long range shots, and rifles better at close quarter engagements. But if you aren't rolling around with a gun safe on your back I feel it's a nice compromise.

I didn't get one of these rifles because it fit squarely in between my heavy, long barreled 300 WSM and my short barreled AR. I got it because I picked it up in the gun shop and just simply thought it felt awesome and looked cool as hell. Frankly I was bored with the usual bolt action rifles- long barrels, big scopes, low capacity, etc... I was also bored with AR builds- been there, bought the attachments. I figured it would be handy to have an uber reliable (mauser type extractor), short barreled, 5-10 round magazine fed, bolt action rifle with good iron sights. That's utility in it's purest form for me. FWIW the thing shoots great. I have only shot out to a couple hundred yards tops with it- after that it's hard to see the target for me without magnification (maybe it's because I just turned 30? lol) Another plus is I don't look like a suburban commando with it on my shoulder. That may not matter to some people just sayin...

Pictured I have one of my bipods on it and a red-dot sight. But honestly It handles so much better without the bipod or the red-dot. I may try a nice LER scope sometime soon.
http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc45/gcwaterski/GUNS/image_zpsd01e3c2c.jpg

This is the Ruger GSR compared to my Ruger M77 (30-06) for comparison.

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc45/gcwaterski/GUNS/IMG_4217.jpg

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