How to respond to your doctor if s/he asks you about gun ownersip?


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Green Lantern
January 17, 2013, 09:13 PM
No, not "get a new doctor!" - that comes later. I mean right then...

I'd assume the answer could vary depending on where you fit in on the scale:

A) Vocal pro-2A proponent
B) Someone who only a very few people, if at all, would know or even suspect you own firearms.

I'd suspect that if your Dr. is willing to go there, a simple denial might be better for you than telling him to butt out of things that are not his business (no matter that it's true). But if you're more of an "A" than a "B," it's not likely that they'd believe you anyway...

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EBK
January 17, 2013, 09:17 PM
My response would be "I dont have to answer that question" or "None of your business" if he continues to push the issue I will walk out.

ETA "how does this pertain to what I am being seen for"? would be a great answer

OptimusPrime
January 17, 2013, 09:18 PM
Our answers have always been "and what business is that of yours?" They mumble something about policy and move on.

Rustler
January 17, 2013, 09:20 PM
My answer to this and the Govt. AWB BS is - Bite Me!

Maybe not The High Road, but the way I feel...

kimbershot
January 17, 2013, 09:20 PM
we compare our arsenals.:D

ZeSpectre
January 17, 2013, 09:21 PM
My Primary care doctor is a lifetime NRA member and a vocal proponent.

However,

Should any other medical professional try to push the issue I will fire them, on the spot, and go find another. Hell if I've severed a relationship with a doctor because I had a hard time understanding his thick accent I sure don't have any issue doing so over inappropriate questions.

tomrkba
January 17, 2013, 09:24 PM
I would let them do the whole anti-gun spiel. Don't really answer the questions or just lie.

Then, say: "I thought doctors were men and women of science. The "studies" and "facts" you quoted or referenced have been shown wrong to the point of mere propaganda. If you had spent any time researching the topic, you would have known that. Perhaps you apply the same level of effort to your medical studies? What level of care am I actually getting here?"

InkEd
January 17, 2013, 09:28 PM
Everyone should simply say "No." End of discussion.

Unless you're being treated for a gun shot wound, any questions about firearms are not relevant to your medical care.

jhb
January 17, 2013, 09:29 PM
They outlawed that in florida, at least I think they did? Going by memory, but it was a political angle being pushed through the ama, pretending to be about gun safety to protect peoples health and their kids, etc.

My take is, id tell my doctor I'm here for medical advice, not gun safety advice. If I wanted that id make an appointment with a gun safety expert who is properly trained......and didn't learn gun safety from a ama phamplet. Course that is assuming my doctor wasn't a professional gun safety trainer on the side. If I got a snarky remark back from said doctor id find a new doctor, but that's me.

coondogger
January 17, 2013, 09:30 PM
Simply say that you don't think it's pertinent to any medical context. If they insist, walk out. And pay them a part of the bill since you were never actually seen as a patient.

rjrivero
January 17, 2013, 09:31 PM
I would just answer no.

However, if you want to educate your physician, remind them that it is considered a Boundry Violation by some to even ask such a question.

Dr. Wheeler did a nice piece on this exact issue a while back.

http://www.haciendapub.com/medicalsentinel/boundary-violations-gun-politics-doctors-office

I would also follow up with asking them a few questions:

1) What is your experience with firearms?
2) Do you have any certifications that show you are qualified to give advice about firearms? Fireams safety? Firearms Storage? Self Defense?
3) Do you feel it is malpractice to be discussing and advising patients in aspects of their lives that you don't have a working understanding of?

You would be surprised how quickly the conversation shuts down.

DMK
January 17, 2013, 09:31 PM
I would ask him how it is relevant to my medical condition.

Is the quality of my medical care dependent on me being a non-gun owner?

Maybe ask him what his sexual preferences are, or what his religious beliefs are, how he voted in the last election. After all, we're asking irrelevant personal questions, aren't we?

The only time I consider this a relevant question is if he is a qualified mental health professional and if you are a danger to yourself or others.

USAF_Vet
January 17, 2013, 09:31 PM
Anything aside from an outright denial will easily be seen for what it is.

You can answer 'yes'
You can answer 'no'
Or you can deflect the question and make it look like you have something to hide, in which case the answer is still obvious. I doubt any non-gun-owners would deflect the question.

i don't see how my owning guns pertains to my general health, and I consider it none of their business, so I simply answer 'no', and instruct my family to do the same.

scaatylobo
January 17, 2013, 09:39 PM
I will INSIST that since he is asking me,then he must tell me all about his feelings on the subject AND if he own any firearms.

Then I will need to know HIS address before I answer his questions -- to the best of my abilitys.

Bet he drops the subject FAST.

M2 Carbine
January 17, 2013, 09:40 PM
My doctor of many years is almost as big into guns as I am.
If I have to strip I lay my pocket carry gun on his desk.:)

But if a doctor asked be anything about guns I would ask him,
What's that got to do with my medical problem?

If he insisted in his questioning I would tell him my having guns, or not, is none of his business.
Then I'd get another doctor because I can't stand being around liberals, especially anti gun liberals.

InkEd
January 17, 2013, 09:43 PM
If you say anything besides a simple "No", then they know the answer is "Yes".

Rob G
January 17, 2013, 09:48 PM
I simply say "no."

You have to understand something, if you don't want somebody reading your medical file to know you own guns then "no" is the only answer you should give. Anything else you might say could be directly quoted by the doctor in your file, which means anybody reading it can pretty much figure out that yes, you do in fact own guns and don't want to talk about it.

j.kramer
January 17, 2013, 09:55 PM
not since the boat accident

M-Cameron
January 17, 2013, 09:58 PM
you have no legal obligation to be truthful to your doctor....if you dont want him to know you own guns, tell him 'No'......if you dont care, tell him 'Yes'.....i dont really see why this is such an issue.

meanmrmustard
January 17, 2013, 10:00 PM
I say "yea Doc, that's why I'm here. Where do you think I hid the gun!!!":D

armedwalleye
January 17, 2013, 10:02 PM
Since I took off the carry weapon and hung it on the coathook opposite side from the nurse before I stepped on the scale.

They just skip that one now.

And when they ask if I feel safe at home, I just smile and nod.

HorseSoldier
January 17, 2013, 10:02 PM
"Do you think buying a gun might help with my flu symptoms? I guess I could try that . . ."

bubba556
January 17, 2013, 10:06 PM
Sometimes but right now it's in my pocket.

emercer4
January 17, 2013, 10:07 PM
You could plead the 5th, assuming that one hasn't been ripped apart by EO too!:fire:

figment
January 17, 2013, 10:10 PM
Answer with the question, "Do you have any guns?" if the answer is no, leave. :)

Vern Humphrey
January 17, 2013, 10:10 PM
"I have been targeted for a burglary before, based on the wrong person finding out what valuables I have in my house. I don't care to repeat the experience, therefore I decline to answer."

Deltaboy
January 17, 2013, 10:16 PM
Tell them none of your business. I told my kids Dr this !

BCCL
January 17, 2013, 10:27 PM
"I have been targeted for a burglary before, based on the wrong person finding out what valuables I have in my house. I don't care to repeat the experience, therefore I decline to answer."

That right there!!! ^^

If you answer "yes", then not only does every "God knows who" person in some government database know you do, but every nurse, aid, janitor and every unknown skeezehead husband/boyfriend/brother/whoever, they are currently pillow talking with, has access to that knowledge, along with your address in the doctors files.

Birch Knoll
January 17, 2013, 10:29 PM
No, no, no....

If your doctor asks "Do you have any guns", glance quickly to your left, and then to your right, lean in close to him, and whisper, "What do you need?"

ElToro
January 17, 2013, 10:37 PM
Why ? You need something shot ?

LUCKYDAWG13
January 17, 2013, 10:40 PM
hey doc can you keep a secret me too :neener:

colorado_handgunner
January 17, 2013, 10:40 PM
I would politely remind him that in my state, asking that question could land him in some legal hot water and he may want to refrain in the future.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

SouthernYankee
January 17, 2013, 10:44 PM
When my doctor asks me about my guns he starts by telling me about his. Then we move on to what he's thinking about getting. After 20 mins. or so we finally get to what I went to see him for. Usually within 2 Sat.'s we're out somewhere on my property exercising our rights and putting on ear to ear grins. If you need a good Dr. I can give you his name... Good luck with yours.

gym
January 17, 2013, 10:50 PM
The last court ruling on this is that you need not answer, nor are they allowed to ask. Mine both carry guns. I usually remove mine when being weighed, it's a standing joke, with or without, both nurses also carry.
Neither of my docs have a problem with guns, I actually was the guy who got one of them into shooting.

Kayaker 1960
January 17, 2013, 10:58 PM
I'm 52 years old, I've seen a few different doctors though thankfully never anything too serious. I've never been asked, that question has nothing to do with my health and if asked that's what I'd say.

7402
January 17, 2013, 10:58 PM
A doctor asked me that question once and I considered it appropriate. Of course, she's my audiologist and I'm hard of hearing. We then had a brief and relevant discussion about getting some high tech ear protection. I have no idea if she is a gun owner or not--she neither volunteered nor did I have a reason to ask.

Isaac-1
January 17, 2013, 11:03 PM
I would probably respond with a question like, why do you ask?

As there may be some valid medical reason, for example he knows I have a bad left shoulder, and might advise the use of a better recoil pad or to avoid loads that kick a lot.

Although in all likelyhood around here it would likely be leading up to questions about good places to hunt, etc.

I have an appointment with my GP in a couple of weeks maybe I will ask him his thoughts on doctors asking about guns.

Birch Knoll
January 17, 2013, 11:05 PM
The last court ruling on this is that you need not answer, nor are they allowed to ask.

No, not if you talking about the Florida law which attempted to prevent physicians from asking about guns. A Federal court permanently blocked enforcement of that law. Doctors have freedom of speech; the government can't tell them what they can and cannot say.

Of course, you're under no obligation to answer, or to be truthful.

DHJenkins
January 17, 2013, 11:09 PM
Has anyone actually been asked this?

gego
January 17, 2013, 11:23 PM
Given the danger that he might put me in a data base, when he asked me if I had guns in my home, I would simply tell him that I might have some Dentine or Wrigley's Juicy Fruit, but I may have already used it up. An alternative answer might be, "I hope the next question your going to ask me isn't when I won't be home".

After the laugh, I would just say no. I gain nothing by confronting him and have a little risk in doing so . But given that I am 68 and probably have been to a doctor three times in the last 20 years, I don't count that as an issue. I just hope I don't need to go sometime for shooting myself in the foot.

Sheepdog1968
January 17, 2013, 11:25 PM
In general when I get a question that is somewhat inappropriate and I really don't want to answe I just say "why do you ask"? It seems to work. I've been using it for 15 years at work. If I ever do get someone to say something that they think is reasonable, I palm to say that it's an impnappropiate question and I'm not going to answer.

HOWARD J
January 17, 2013, 11:30 PM
A long time ago my Dr. asked me if I had a gun.
I told him I carry a gun
He said" let me see it " I took out the bullets & handed it to him.
" where can I get one" I told him
He bought one
Glock 26

hueytaxi
January 17, 2013, 11:56 PM
The AMA has lobbied for more gun control. Obama has enlisted the CDC to explore gun violence. Guess at the outcome of such research. I'm sure in 20 minutes on my laptop I can research more pertinent factual info than the whole CDC can in 6 months.

Ehtereon11B
January 18, 2013, 12:05 AM
My old doctor back in NY knew of my military service and asked if I had firearms. I responded with a simple "Yes" and he proceeded to ask me what he should get for personal protection. Spent a good 20 minutes going over firearm recommendations. Last I heard he ended up getting a Beretta Px4 before this whole mess started.

Ohio Gun Guy
January 18, 2013, 12:10 AM
I was asked, while having one of the kids check-up. I said no. Later, I encouraged our changing Dr.'s.....

para.2
January 18, 2013, 12:24 AM
A number of years ago, taking my youngest son in for vaccination, the doc asked me if I had any firearms at home. I was younger, more confrontational, and taken by surprise, so I Looked him in the eye and said "That's none of your G--D-mn business!" That resulted in a several minute lecture from him about the dangers of guns in the home, importance of gunlocks, etc, after which I asked him which firearms instructors courses he had attended. (I had been training soldiers for years, local law-enforcement and concealed-carry classes,more recently, and was state-championship level at cowboy action shooting that spring.) He said that he had none of that, just studies in some medical journal. We walked out, and son got his immunization somewhere else the following week.
If asked the same now, I'd simply answer, "No.";)

velojym
January 18, 2013, 12:52 AM
Far more people being killed by medical mistakes... I'd tell him his family was in more danger having a doctor in the house.

Chevelle SS
January 18, 2013, 01:11 AM
"None of your business."

Dr_B
January 18, 2013, 01:22 AM
If we don't answer our doctors, does federal law require a mandatory prostate exam?

Fishslayer
January 18, 2013, 01:31 AM
Everyone should simply say "No." End of discussion.


^^^ This. Kinda like "Are you gay?" any answer but no means yes. :D

Somebody pointed out that it's not illegal to lie to your doctor, but it might become so when they become Fed employees. :what:

Apachedriver
January 18, 2013, 01:53 AM
No need to get confrontational or to lie to the doc or anyone else asking.

Simple answer. "In light of recent events, I can't answer that question. If I say No, I might become a victim. If I say Yes, I might become a victim. I don't know who will have access to my answers. Therefore, I would risk putting my family and I in future danger by answering truthfully."

End of story.

pockets
January 18, 2013, 07:38 AM
It's never been an issue for me.
I've been friends with my GP doctor and my hematologist for a long time. We talk about guitars, guns, books, etc....all sorts of things that we share common interests in.
.

mcdonl
January 18, 2013, 07:45 AM
"Can I get a copy of my records on the way out?"

Shultzhaus
January 18, 2013, 07:58 AM
If you own a gun, be careful about saying no on any form. The feds can then get you for lying. That's just part of all the new rules that are coming our way. You buy a new gun at a store, and lie on the app. form, they can get you for perjury. I would just leave the doctor's form blank.

ontheroad
January 18, 2013, 08:03 AM
Ask him if he still beats his wife.

Davek1977
January 18, 2013, 08:05 AM
Shultzhaus said: The feds can then get you for lying. And exactly what law would you be in violation for "lying" to them? What are these "new rules" you speak of? Exactly "how" are they going to "get you" for doing so? I mean, if you know they will, you must know the how and why behind it, right? Otherwise, without basis for such comments, you are simply adding the fear many people are feeling. I'm not saying your comment is without basis, but WHAT basis is what I'm concerned with......

Evergreen
January 18, 2013, 08:06 AM
I always leave it blank, like I do my SSN. There is no legal obligation to supply the information for either. If the doctor won't see me because I leave it blank, then I go find a different doctor. Most doctors and offices are so busy, it wouldn't be worth their time to fight you on it.

The only time this may be an issue is if you are going in to receive anti-psychotic or mind-altering substances for anxiety, suicide, depression , etc. In which case there may be some challenges.

BCCL
January 18, 2013, 09:10 AM
There is nothing that allows the feds to "get you" for lying to your doctor.

foghornl
January 18, 2013, 09:39 AM
"Mr. Foggy, do you own guns?"

"Doc, are you familiar with the term *Boundary Violation*? "

jmorris
January 18, 2013, 09:40 AM
My doc already knows, have her check my lead levels every year.

Drail
January 18, 2013, 09:52 AM
I stopped going to doctors when they all decided to stop treating patients who suffer from chronic pain. They all seem to be working for the DEA now. I haven't found one doctor in over 3 years who will even give you an appointment if you suffer from chronic pain.

AirForceShooter
January 18, 2013, 09:52 AM
Just lie and say no.

It's not illegal.

And if you think your records are private you are sooo wrong.

AFS

psyopspec
January 18, 2013, 09:53 AM
If you own a gun, be careful about saying no on any form. The feds can then get you for lying. That's just part of all the new rules that are coming our way. You buy a new gun at a store, and lie on the app. form, they can get you for perjury.

I too am curious about your source on this. Just because it's illegal to lie on a 4473 does not = lying to a doctor is illegal. That's like saying "Just because I can't lie while delivering sworn testimony in court means that I can't lie while talking to my city's solid waste manager."

As to the original question, the answer is no. If the guy has hunting pictures on the walls of his exam room, then the answer might be that I used to hunt but no longer do.

Phineas Dregg
January 18, 2013, 09:57 AM
"Do you have one for sale? What kind is it and how much do you want for it?":)

aka108
January 18, 2013, 09:59 AM
I've seen most of the Drs I have been to and my Dentist at gunshows, at the range and swapped shooting stories with them. No big deal.

TAKtical
January 18, 2013, 10:01 AM
Simply, "No".

Phineas Dregg
January 18, 2013, 10:01 AM
This isn't quite as big of a problem here in AZ. In fact, the director of the Emergency Department where I work says that when he interviews potential doctors or PAs, he asks "Do you like guns?" and "Do you like scotch?" He says he refuses to hire anyone who doesn't answer affirmatively to both questions.

2nd 41
January 18, 2013, 10:05 AM
I came across that in an office one time. I thought about it and did not reply. I was more concerned that the office personnel does not need to know my business. "No" would be the appropriate answer if an answer is required.

morcey2
January 18, 2013, 10:16 AM
My Dr. knows that I own a gun already; We've been shooting together several times. I'm not sure, but everything is so fuzzy from the accident. You should never try transporting all of your firearms at once across the deepest spot at Flaming Gorge Reservoir in a float tube. It's amazing how much damage one misplaced bayonet can do in a situation like that.

Matt

longknife12
January 18, 2013, 10:18 AM
Actually, I shoot with my Doc.We usually talk shooting and Elk hunting. He has never asked.
Dan

Rob G
January 18, 2013, 10:22 AM
If you own a gun, be careful about saying no on any form. The feds can then get you for lying.

Yeah, you can take off the tin foil hat. People lie to doctors all the time. Depending on the question it might be stupid to lie, but hardly illegal. If they're asking about gun ownership it's neither stupid not illegal to lie.

Zeke/PA
January 18, 2013, 10:29 AM
Somehow the subject came up at a recent visit of mine to my M.D."s office.
Seems one of the Nurses is a trap/skeet shooter and I offered to alter a buttstock on one of her shotguns and she was delighted.
No fee of course.
She shot Thursday night I'm anxious to hear the results.

brnmw
January 18, 2013, 10:33 AM
Tell he or she you got a BB gun.... and if you own one then you are not lying, then you also don't look like you are hiding anything either. ;)

rdhood
January 18, 2013, 10:37 AM
I'm guessing that if you answer affirmatively, then some box gets checked on your medical record... like if someone admits to smoking.

About the smoking comment. A few of my coworkers who are not regular smokers go out back and smoke a cigar on Fridays at 4:30. One of them told me a tale of telling his doctor that he smokes a cigar on Fridays. He thought nothing of it... until another of his doctors at a DIFFERENT practice said, "So, you are a smoker?". Once that gets onto your medical record, it NEVER comes off. It affects your health insurance and life insurance rates... forever. I suspect that if you answer affirmatively about guns, it will get on your permanent medical record and never go away. SO DON'T ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT GUNS TO YOUR DOCTOR, AND ADVISE EVERYONE IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD NOT TO ANSWER QUESTIONS IF POSED BY DOCTORS.

If you own a gun, be careful about saying no on any form. The feds can then get you for lying.

The feds can't "get you" for lying to your doctor... what kind of BS is that?

CajunBass
January 18, 2013, 10:38 AM
I see no reason to lie about it. I also see no particular reason to answer the question. A simple N/A on a form, or a "none of your concern" if asked face to face.

KMatch
January 18, 2013, 10:44 AM
Many of you guys are missing the point. It's not about answering your Dr., it's about what goes to the guberment. So what if your Doc is pro gun? My ex doctor sells ammo, has a firing range used by the local SD, etc, but if you chit chat with him and admit you own guns as a good ol' boy, it still goes as a check in the "yes" blank and goes on your record. "NO" is the proper answer. I don't remember lying to a doctor being a felony. yet...

fdashes
January 18, 2013, 10:47 AM
J.kramer...I forgot about that horrific accident...I am so sorry for your loss

HankR
January 18, 2013, 10:52 AM
Never come up with my doctor--wife and kids have been instructed to not answer if asked in my absence.

I have brought it up w/ my eye doctor before, as it seemed relevant. Only problem was that he wasn't a handgun shooter and had to ask me to demonstrate about how far from my face the front sight would be. He said I should bring in my gun next time and try it out w/ the machine, but he guessed that he had a good prescription for shooting/computer glasses by guess (and he did).

On a somewhat related note, we go to a medical clinic with multiple doctors and a rather large waiting room. I find that this is an excellent place to drop off "Grandpa Jack" (http://jpfo.org/filegen-a-m/gj.htm) comic books

HoosierQ
January 18, 2013, 11:22 AM
I'll just be saying "no". Why get into the beef? I suppose if they make me fill out a 4473 everytime I go to the doctor and "swear" as to the fact under penalty of law then I guess I will contemplate.

I'll just be saying "no" in the meantime.

guyfromohio
January 18, 2013, 11:25 AM
Lie. Who cares?

Ole Coot
January 18, 2013, 11:33 AM
I've carried concealed for many years so I guess it's public record. But I did have a company Dr. ask years ago, wanted to know if I owned one, would actually use one, was shocked at my answer and probably went back to NYC telling his friends about those crazy rednecks from KY, this was easy I asked him because he was about my age where he served in Vietnam. No answer on that just we're finished.

ultramag44
January 18, 2013, 12:20 PM
Well, my PCP is in my gun club, so we always talk guns when I see him! :)

However, my company pays for 4 visits a year to a certain clinic. I have only been there 2X in the last 10 years. The last time the nurse asked if I have guns. In a very polite, modulated tone AND using medical terminology, I replied, "When was the last time you (insert a certain sexual activity here)"?

She flustered and replied, " Um...ehh...That's none of your business sir!"

I smiled and said, "True, I shouldn't be so inquisitive."

She got the message, skipped the silly questions and got to the business @ hand. ;)

But, I agree w/ the other posters, just say "No" in a calm, disinterested manner when asked if you have guns in the home.

Tygarys
January 18, 2013, 02:35 PM
I ask them to fill out a form I get from here:

http://www.keepandbeararms.com/information/XcIBViewItem.asp?id=2135

Teachu2
January 18, 2013, 02:52 PM
I ask him how much liquor he keeps at home.

Certaindeaf
January 18, 2013, 02:56 PM
What's that got to do with hard-on pills, doc?

Clean97GTI
January 18, 2013, 02:59 PM
My wife and I were at an OB appointment when she was pregnant with our son. Her doc asked if I could get him in to the SHOT show.

Certaindeaf
January 18, 2013, 03:04 PM
My wife and I were at an OB appointment when she was pregnant with our son. Her doc asked if I could get him in to the SHOT show.
Sounds like extortion.

wojownik
January 18, 2013, 03:06 PM
My doctors generally never ask. However, the only exception was our family practitioner, where the topic came up in conversation (I was reading a sporting magazine, while waiting for him to come in, looking at a rifle ad).

Doctor: "Do you have any firearms?"
Me: "Yup. All locked up safe and sound" (smiling politely).
Doctor "Are you under stress or feeling depressed."
I replied "No, of course not, But then I haven't seen your bill yet."

He smiled, and went about the physical. Great doctor. Not pro-2A by any definition, but a nice guy. He passed on a few years ago. But, even though he was a nice guy, the exchange left me concerned about mixing doctors, politics and social agendas.

Dnaltrop
January 18, 2013, 03:45 PM
I offer to take him out to the range, and detail any safety equipment he may need, but he monitors my lead levels as well, it's not a surprise to him. .

He hasn't taken me up on it, but his Nurse asked a few questions about the range. ;)

TRX
January 18, 2013, 03:53 PM
>Everyone should simply say "No." End of discussion.

Though I ordinarily don't hold with lying, an improper question merits an improper answer.

Any answer other than "no" will be interpreted as "yes."

JohnM
January 18, 2013, 04:01 PM
At my age I see several different Docs on a regular basis now.
Never been asked that question, but I wouldn't pull punches and would just state it was none of their business.

Derry 1946
January 18, 2013, 04:03 PM
"Do I have any guns? Of course! I have caulk guns in two different calibers. But only for self defense (against moisture), and I know how to use them properly and store them safely. I'm thinking about getting a semi-automatic grease gun, and a small glue gun for concealed carry. As a curio/relic, I have a really old TV that contains some cathode ray guns. Next question."

SharpsDressedMan
January 18, 2013, 04:07 PM
rjrivero, I loved your responses, and will definitely use them. I think I'll type them on a card and carry in my wallet.

Certaindeaf
January 18, 2013, 05:02 PM
^
If you used the quote function we'd know what you were talking about.

KingMedicine
January 18, 2013, 05:06 PM
I took my doctor and family out shooting for his wedding. I think I'm safe.

sonick808
January 18, 2013, 05:10 PM
no.

c.latrans
January 18, 2013, 05:15 PM
My doctor does not ask. But if one should, the answer will be a simple "no".

verge
January 18, 2013, 05:18 PM
No, not "get a new doctor!" - that comes later. I mean right then...

I'd assume the answer could vary depending on where you fit in on the scale:

A) Vocal pro-2A proponent
B) Someone who only a very few people, if at all, would know or even suspect you own firearms.

I'd suspect that if your Dr. is willing to go there, a simple denial might be better for you than telling him to butt out of things that are not his business (no matter that it's true). But if you're more of an "A" than a "B," it's not likely that they'd believe you anyway...
Simple,

"That is none of your business don't ask me again."

Vern Humphrey
January 18, 2013, 05:18 PM
If we don't answer our doctors, does federal law require a mandatory prostate exam?
No. They might find my back-up gun!:p

UnitMaster
January 18, 2013, 05:21 PM
I would simply counter with:

I have you ever considered cheating on your spouse?

The moral compass of my doctor is just as relevant.

Certaindeaf
January 18, 2013, 05:22 PM
I would simply counter with:

I have you ever considered cheating on your spouse?

The moral compass of my doctor is just as relevant.
No hard-on pills for you!

Hornd
January 18, 2013, 05:42 PM
I'm a physician. The government is always adding REQUIRED questions that must be documented with visits, usually under the guise of some sort of quality check. As you may know, doctors are being required as part of the healthcare reform act to buy expensive computer record systems for their practice, which have not shown cost savings http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/business/news/report-says-it-hasnt-mitigated-health-expenses-670952/ (Similar to big expensive taxpayer funded government required databases about gun issues that never affected crime)

Will the question of whether or not you own a gun ever come out of your doctors record into a bigger database? Who knows.
Most Doctors dont care, and I'll bet well over the majority are gun owners.
Only for patients with psychiatric issues or with a family member with psych issues should this even be considered a reasonable question.

I would answer no If a doctor asked me that question.

Certaindeaf
January 18, 2013, 06:06 PM
That's a pistol in my pocket, thanks for the pills! lolz

we are not amused
January 18, 2013, 06:12 PM
My doctor and I would compare our shooting scores.

But seriously, it is none of their business, and would be a boundary violation if they started to lecture you on gun safety or insisted that you tell them if you declined.

HankR
January 18, 2013, 06:14 PM
What's that got to do with hard-on pills, doc?

OK, now it makes sense (Is that a gun in your pocket or...)

Certaindeaf
January 18, 2013, 06:19 PM
OK, now it makes sense (Is that a gun in your pocket or...)
Certain vernacular. kind of a joke

bolus
January 18, 2013, 06:51 PM
I'm a physician. The government is always adding REQUIRED questions that must be documented with visits, usually under the guise of some sort of quality check. As you may know, doctors are being required as part of the healthcare reform act to buy expensive computer record systems for their practice, which have not shown cost savings http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/business/news/report-says-it-hasnt-mitigated-health-expenses-670952/ (Similar to big expensive taxpayer funded government required databases about gun issues that never affected crime)

Will the question of whether or not you own a gun ever come out of your doctors record into a bigger database? Who knows.
Most Doctors dont care, and I'll bet well over the majority are gun owners.
Only for patients with psychiatric issues or with a family member with psych issues should this even be considered a reasonable question.

I would answer no If a doctor asked me that question.

Im a physician as well. We use EPIC, one of the larger electronic record systems and there is no entry place for recording firearms. Which means it would be extremely difficult to get information out of it on who has a firearm. Not to mention that HIPAA is in the way. I dont really ask about it unless I want to compare hardware

Though after my handgun training I learned a lot more about potential lead exposure and may bring that up to my patients who are at the range frequently.

If I was in New York I would be telling them to F off. My obligation is to the patient. Unless they say they are going to go home and shoot their family and then themselves, I am not about to start reporting every patient who is depressed.

Shultzhaus
January 18, 2013, 07:13 PM
Dave1977 - and others I'm sorry about the no to a doctor. I should have said the form that you fill out to get a new gun at a dealer. The dealer himself explained that one to me. I laughed at some of the stupid questions about do you take drugs? have you ever been committed to a mental institution? and so on. I asked him who would even answer these questions truthfully, and that was his answer, that when the feds audit him they pick out random forms to see what they catch. If you falsify one, you can be charged with something - not sure what. My info came from the dealer himself. (the hell with the doctor)

herkyguy
January 18, 2013, 07:41 PM
i'll ask him/her why and invite them out to go shooting in the sticks....but i'd leave it at that.

Homeland Security already requires its employees to fill out a form going on and on about whether we own firearms and have any disqualifying conditions....it's a CYA kind of move that started about two years ago.

things like this never go away, they just expand.

Mousegun
January 18, 2013, 07:50 PM
I say when the AMA starts giving shooting classes and/or firearm safety courses and the NRA starts doing general medical practice and/or doing brain surgery, then we can talk about my gun ownership or lack thereof.

USAF_Vet
January 18, 2013, 07:54 PM
If a doctor asks me if there are guns in my house, I'll ask him if there is a doctor in his. Statistically, more people die from medical malpractice than from guns.

Deer_Freak
January 18, 2013, 07:58 PM
I live in a small town. It is hard for me to lie to my Dr. A week later he drives by and sees me riding a 4 wheeler with a orange hat on and a gun slung over my back. He might not be real bright but he has that one figured out. If I feel the need to lie to a Dr I go elsewhere. My family doctor was one of my references when I applied for my concealed weapons permit.

627PCFan
January 18, 2013, 08:01 PM
I like the boating accident. Have them all the time.......

Green Lantern
January 18, 2013, 10:28 PM
and I'll bet well over the majority are gun owners.

Could be around here, but I know that around here, most of them endorsed Obama the first time. Not sure if my soon-to-be one did or not (other one retired).

I'm not sure if e-scripts are part of that huge computer record system or not, but I can speak from experience that they can be FAR more trouble than they are worth all around.

Original: Get handed paper Rx, or get Rx called or faxed in to pharmacy. If not ready when you arrive at pharmacy, they can get on it right away.

Post E-Script Mandate: CAN'T get paper Rx, gets sent electronically. Rarely might arrive in time to be ready when you get to pharmacy. Usually not, more often than not the patient beats the script to the pharmacy by at least 15 minutes....

But I digress. In short, what I gather is that IMO, a simple "no" is the very best answer to give to the question, when practical. IE, not in Deer Freak or others' situations where Doc is liable to actually SEE you with a firearm. Works for me, though I'm one of the outspoken 2A activist types. It's not like open-carry is part of my personal activism repertoire....

Even if your Doc is pro-gun...who's to say that Doc is the ONLY one nosing through your file?

Hokkmike
January 18, 2013, 10:55 PM
I just tell the truth. So what?

76shuvlinoff
January 18, 2013, 11:14 PM
Since it's a nunoya moment, as is nunoya damn business. Lying doesn't bother me a bit.

brewthunda
January 19, 2013, 05:45 AM
Gerry Spence once said that he always wanted to start a law school where prospective students would have to answer just a single question correctly to be admitted.

The question: "What's the worst thing you've ever done?"

Everyone who replied "That's none of your ****ing business" would be accepted immediately.

And that's my answer to doctors who ask questions about stuff unrelated to my present health matters (minus the swearing).

7thCavScout
January 19, 2013, 01:37 PM
My personal physician happens to also be one of my best friends. he is not a gun owner, but his Dad and I shoot quite often together.
On the other hand when I go to VA for my Service Connected (combat) injuries my Doc there does ask about "access to firearms" I've always answered yes I do. I hope I don't wind up paying a price for honesty.

joeschmoe
January 19, 2013, 04:12 PM
Yes. Twice on the forms you fill out. I did not answer.
Once verbally. I said "I won't answer that question".

powder
January 19, 2013, 04:36 PM
I ask about their malpractice insurance carrier. :evil:

rem700nut
January 19, 2013, 07:28 PM
if my doc asked me that ,i came up with the answer i would give ,.... so doc just how many times a week do you and your wife have sex?

1911 guy
January 19, 2013, 07:34 PM
I got lucky. My doctor is a small town guy with a small collection of his own. At my last physical he did a close inspection and said he was thinking of buying a 1911, too. Then he checked me out for my physical.

pa350z
January 19, 2013, 07:37 PM
Here is the rub. If you don't answer, it is either then checked as a yes or refuse. Then, when your family members go to the doc, they answer yes. Now what. Early on in Obamacare, this won't be an issue but will in time.

Friends.... at some point, we all will be required to answer the question or be denied health care. It won't be an issue of going to "another" doc or provider because you will be deemed ineligible. Obamacare will be the ultimate tool for gun control.

joeschmoe
January 19, 2013, 07:58 PM
Here is the rub. If you don't answer, it is either then checked as a yes or refuse. Then, when your family members go to the doc, they answer yes. Now what. Early on in Obamacare, this won't be an issue but will in time.

Friends.... at some point, we all will be required to answer the question or be denied health care. It won't be an issue of going to "another" doc or provider because you will be deemed ineligible. Obamacare will be the ultimate tool for gun control.
What's wrong with "refuse"?

I could also ask why they didn't ask me about my diet or exercise since those factors are far more reposible for health/death than the presense of guns.

Kim
January 19, 2013, 09:03 PM
Here is what I do as a physician, I rarely ask about firearms. If I do here is how it goes. You know your father or mother has dementia etc. If they have guns you might consider removing them without causing them stress. If you have young children in your home and firearms you need to store them safely. The only way I get worse than the (if stage is ) they tell me they are thinking about killing themselves. Then they go straight to evaluation by a mental health professional either voluntary or not. I have never had a patient that talked about killing others. What I am saying is that for the usual gun safety stuff you do not have to ask direct questions. Where I live I assume everyone probably has a gun. Which is probably true.

Krogen
January 19, 2013, 09:42 PM
Sorry Kim, but you crossed the line with ". . . you need to store them safely." While you mean well, and I don't disagree with your concern, you're preaching to the patient. With that simple "if" statement, you treat firearms as a health concern.

Texan Scott
January 19, 2013, 10:24 PM
How about...

"Not in about twenty years .... does this have anything to do with my prostate?"

wickedsprint
January 19, 2013, 10:36 PM
"No, but a lot of my friends go shooting and I was considering one since they look fun, why do you ask?"

Maybe you end up with a new shooting buddy vs initiating a conflict.

buckhorn_cortez
January 19, 2013, 10:45 PM
Has anyone actually been asked this?

Personally, not by a doctor. However, the last time I was admitted to a hospital (Dec 2012), the forms I had to fill out included a question as to whether I owned or had access to firearms. I left that blank, as with other questions that I did not want to answer.

However, to make up for it, and show them I was really trying to get into the spirit of their forms and answer as accurately as possible - I put my age down as 63.8333. I'm sure they appreciated the extra effort on that one...

Green Lantern
January 19, 2013, 10:47 PM
Here is the rub. If you don't answer, it is either then checked as a yes or refuse. Then, when your family members go to the doc, they answer yes. Now what. Early on in Obamacare, this won't be an issue but will in time.

That's why you make sure you and the family are all on the same page, whatever route you take with it.

Kim
January 19, 2013, 10:49 PM
Krogen--- You missed my point. I do not routinely ask or say anything regarding firearms PERIOD. There is no check list etc. I only mention it if I think I need to. I have been practicing for 20 plus years and I could count one one hand the times I have ever brought it up. If .gov demands I do it will be the indirect way I mentioned. IF YOU DO HAVE FIREARMS????? Not DO YOU HAVE....

Airbrush Artist
January 19, 2013, 10:57 PM
Will Emergency Room Doctors Be Inquiring?,Just a Thought

Krogen
January 19, 2013, 10:58 PM
That's all well and good, Kim. You example, however, of discussing home firearms storage in a medical setting is the problem. It's irrelevant to medical care no matter how infrequently you might bring it up.

BoilerUP
January 19, 2013, 11:07 PM
My son's pediatrician asked this when he was just a few weeks old, amid a bevy of other questions about cabinet locks, stairs, outlet covers, etc.

I looked her in the eye and said "Yes. Why does that matter?"

Probably seeing the look on my face, she said something about not being judgmental, just evaluating potential risks in the home and ensuring they are mitigated in the interest of safety. I told her my weapons were secure from my infant and any other child that might be in my home, and it hasn't been brought up again.

If my GP asks, answer will be the same - "Yes. Why does that matter?"

I'm not going to lie to my doc, but I'm not going to listen to a naive spiel from him, either. Answer the question honestly, then shut down any BS that might follow.

Kim
January 19, 2013, 11:14 PM
I do not bring it up unless it is relevant!!!!! My gosh 5 times or less in 20 plus years. Give me a break.

Kim
January 19, 2013, 11:19 PM
Firearms are NOT a health concern. I agree. I have also advised some patients to get a firearm, police report and restraining order. I would never just recommend a restraining order. I was a stalked ONCE. I carried a firearm and went to court to get a permanent restraining order. It was a total stranger.

Hindsight
January 20, 2013, 11:25 AM
I am a physician in a medium size town. I am also very PRO 2A. I do not think that firearms are a health concern, but I do think that the people that handle them are.

Physicians deal with all sorts of people, from company CEO's to mentally handicapped. I am not saying that one is smarter than the other, however I try to treat each of them the same, regardless of their status.

People lie to physicians all of the time. Are your following your diet? exercising? taking all your medications? wearing your seatbelt? child wearing helmet while riding bike? use any illegal drugs? etc. I think you get the idea. Most people are not going to give 100% honest answers all the time, and we accept this. If you are asked by your physician then just say no and move on.

Are firearms related to your health? No, but the people who handle them are. Mental illness with delusional behavior, bipolar, dementia, teenagers with poor choices/coping skills, suicidal people, and lead exposure are all reasons to inquire about weapons in the home. If you dont what to answer then say no. I have litigation to worry about and will have covered my butt.

Ya'll are paranoid about the government (I am as well), but I am also paranoid about family members.....because they contact lawyers when something happen. Bringing up firearms (routine or not) in a medical setting is relevant to covering me, and sorry it is about doing the best for you, but also about covering my butt as well.

@Krogen- do you really want to limit what you physician talks to you about in a medical setting? If the physician is wrong (which happens), why not teach them something? You are making the assumption that everyone with a firearm is a responsible gunowner.

Stumpknocker
January 20, 2013, 11:56 AM
Just say 'no'!

buckhorn_cortez
January 20, 2013, 12:31 PM
Will Emergency Room Doctors Be Inquiring?,Just a Thought

I have been in an ER twice in the past 1.5 years, and once in 1996. The doctors and nurses are so busy working on you that the only questions that have ever been asked are directly related to the problem they're treating

The only other questions were asked by the admitting staff to my wife - "Do you have insurance?" and - "How do you want to pay the deductible?"

Krogen
January 20, 2013, 03:50 PM
@Krogen- do you really want to limit what you physician talks to you about in a medical setting? If the physician is wrong (which happens), why not teach them something? You are making the assumption that everyone with a firearm is a responsible gunowner.

Yes, I do want to limit what my physician discusses with me - to medical issues. If we happen to be in a social environment, at the range, having a beer etc. then fine we can talk guns. In the doc's office, it's business. I'm paying for health advice. (I do mean me, not my insurance company. I'm on an HSA plan so it's my money!) I want the doc focusing on my health, not my guns. Office visits are so short I expect the discussion to stay on topic. Even if the doc is wrong, it isn't my place to educate him/her during an office visit on my nickle.

I disagree with your last point. I'm not assuming all gun owners are responsible. I've witnessed irresponsible gun owners in action. Still, I think the doc's office isn't the place to turn the irresponsible into responsible gun owners.

Now about privacy: I truly wouldn't care about the doc knowing I own guns. It's that dreaded data system. Call me paranoid (am I paranoid enough???? :what:) but once that info goes in the system I have no control over its disposition. I know I'm probably on lists and in databases already, but why feed more info into them? No good can come of that for me. Currently we have privacy laws, but those could be repealed in the future. It's the same argument we use against gun registration.

This issue puts me in an ethical dilemma. Thankfully it hasn't come up yet. I'm not a liar, so "no" is a problematic answer. "NOYDB" and "yes" are equivalent. I really just want the doc, in the office, to be silent about guns. Shades of "don't ask - don't tell" I suppose.

RevLouM
January 20, 2013, 04:00 PM
My family doctor and I have hunted together. He already knows. He will check "no".

Any other doctor I encounter will be told no. It's that simple.

What are they prepared to do? Add 4473's to our medical records?

I think there would be some serious public issues should they try and mandate that.

Crashbox
January 20, 2013, 04:21 PM
It's none of my doctor's business- never has been, never will be.

easyg
January 20, 2013, 04:39 PM
they tell me they are thinking about killing themselves. Then they go straight to evaluation by a mental health professional either voluntary or not.
Why?

The very notion of being subjected to an involuntary mental health evaluation is probably why so few folks are willing to tell their physician when they are feeling suicidal.

303tom
January 20, 2013, 04:43 PM
Almost all of the professionals I deal with are avid hunters & or collectors.............

Inebriated
January 20, 2013, 04:50 PM
21 years of going to the doctor, never been asked. If I am, I'll likely say "no".

joecil
January 20, 2013, 05:53 PM
The question has never come up and if it did I would ask them what business was it of theirs either way and it isn't.

hueyville
January 20, 2013, 09:02 PM
I work as a volunteer with our local EMA, GEMA, FEMA and local regional hospital in disaster situations. My primary care specialist is an avid hunter and shooter. I was talking to my internest about possible scenarios during a pandemic outbreak and how he could be a target for someone desperate for meds during an outbreak. I took him to the range and spent the day burning powder. That was in November. The next week I took him to the toy store and he purchased three Sig Saur's, two Khars, and two Ruger pistols. We went across town and picked up a 12 gauge Benelli for him and a 20 gauge 870 for his wife. Stocked him up on practice and defense ammo. Less than a month later full panic hits and prices go nutts and shelves empty. He is a very happy doctor and now loves the sport.

Ric
January 20, 2013, 09:13 PM
Two words
"Boundary violation"
They won't ask again

zorro45
January 20, 2013, 09:29 PM
Gee, I use a variant of this if I get pulled over for an unconstitutional "roadblock" or small difference of interpretation of the traffic laws. If the officer wants to look around inside my vehicle, I respond Officer, do you mind if I go to your home and/or personal vehicle and just have a "look around"? (last time this was a very cute female trooper, and I didn't get a ticket).

Hindsight
January 22, 2013, 03:22 AM
Yes, I do want to limit what my physician discusses with me - to medical issues....In the doc's office, it's business. I'm paying for health advice.

Do your hobbies, activities, and social choices not affect your health? Now I absolutely agree that if your doctor "focuses" the entire checkup on "only guns" then that is ridiculous. The question is for risk stratification in my mind. If looking at heart disease I am not going to ask about guns, but I will ask about family history, exercise, diet, job stress, etc. If you come in with problem where a gun may be used to cause harm, then absolutely I am going to ask. Am I the perfect doc, not by a long shot, but I do try to do my best for my patients.

Still, I think the doc's office isn't the place to turn the irresponsible into responsible gun owners.

Where or when should we educate people? Honestly a 5 second blurb on gun safety can start the process. Many times this little blurb will spur the patient to ask a question that they have been reluctant to ask. I agree that office is not the best place to teach gun safety, but broaching the subject can lead to referring them to a range or instructor for further "proper" instruction. I learned more about girls from my dad while cutting firewood than I ever did in a bar.

Now about privacy: I truly wouldn't care about the doc knowing I own guns. It's that dreaded data system

Krogen, this we can agree on. The government is mandating electronic medical records be used for patient encounters. Now you and I both know that it is not for "better patient care" or for "reduction in medical errors". This is purely for data mining on docs and patients. You are concerned about being on a list or in a database, and you should be. Once that data/information is placed in the system, it goes to cyberspace waiting to be pulled out, tallied, logged, and interpreted by the powers that be. So yes be paranoid, and believe me sometimes we wish patients would lie to us just so we would not have to hear/deal with the truth.

I do appreciate your opinions and your points regarding where you stand on this issue. I do not begrudge anyone for standing up for what they believe in, and will respect them more for it. You have given several points to think about, a viewpoint from the other side of the stethoscope, and I hope that I have done the same for you. Without conflict there is no progress, without questions there are no answers, and without debate there is no understanding.

Kiln
January 22, 2013, 03:42 AM
The data could be compiled over time and used to project firearm owners in a negative light. The small and seemingly harmless question can be turned into a negative statistic down the road to try and paint firearm ownership as a health concern.

Cosmoline
January 22, 2013, 03:48 AM
Thankfully around here when doctors ask about firearms they're usually gun nuts.

BoilerUP
January 22, 2013, 07:41 AM
The data could be compiled over time and used to project firearm owners in a negative light. The small and seemingly harmless question can be turned into a negative statistic down the road to try and paint firearm ownership as a health concern.

Like what?

Mp7
January 22, 2013, 08:03 AM
"Why, do i have any holes in my body that are not supposed to be there?"

Resist Evil
January 22, 2013, 08:11 AM
My wife was suffering from a pain in her back. We decided to go to the ER. One question asked by the attending was do we have guns in the house. I answered that they are verrry dangerous. I don't know how she recorded my answer on her paperwork.

wrc
January 22, 2013, 08:59 AM
Like what?

Once you have a data set that includes self-reported facts like gun ownership, all sorts of correlations can be made with other data. Plausible "connections" can be made for the layman if the statistician carefully slices and dices the full data set.

-Gun ownership correlates with depression among females 18-29? Sure!
-Gun ownership correlates with incidence of heart disease among males 30-47? Not as crazy as it sounds, it's all in the data!

The goal of the AMA, AAP, and APA through their push for medical practitioners to collect this data is to help them advance the case that "gun violence" and "gun ownership" is a "public health problem". It is not a benign way for your local physician to take an interest in your hobbies and health. It is a political act to advance the political cause of gun control.

Once the data is collected, it is collected. It doesn't get uncollected. There are always unscrupulous researchers available to take that data and present findings that advance one agenda or another. Refer to the CDC back in the 90's.

DoubleMag
January 22, 2013, 09:49 AM
I'm guessing the purpose of this post is a response to the President's recent Executive Order.
Since that order has been issued it's a game changer IMHO and after scanning through almost all posts, I never saw a mention of the constitutionality of it all.

My response...'' You're forms must be old.The Affordable Health Care Act forbids that question. You're technicallly in violation of the law by asking, and , any Executive Order does NOT override existing law."

Remembering 1) I've probably had a long term relationship with the Doctor:)
2) None of them, NONE, like:barf: the Affordable Health Care Act

If it's a new doctor or an ER situation, I HAVE THE UPPER HAND of the law. I will ask to speak to the floor supervisor etc.

Only question I have really is, what happens if you're en route to ER after a car wreck, and carrying your CHL appproved pistol. Obviously the hospital officer will secure all your property including your sidearm. Would hospital staff ''automatically'' report it in accordance with the new Exec rule??

Robert
January 22, 2013, 10:15 AM
It's none of their business. Answer however you feel the most comfortable.

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