4 gun hunting battery (not including rimfires)


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Jason_W
January 19, 2013, 02:57 PM
Now that I'm finally back to work for a decent salary, I'm beginning to save to rebuild my collection. I want to start by filling most hunting niches while keeping my caliber collection small. Here's what I'm thinking and why:

1. Short barrel 12 ga threaded for choke tubes. I've found that short barrel shotguns are awesome when hinting grouse in the thick brush. They are also a decent up-close deer gun when loaded with slugs.

2. Longer barrel 12-gauge for waterfowl hunting (I don't really have the money for all the gear needed for waterfowl, so this is at the bottom of my list).

3. .44 mag carbine. I handload and cast so I can make light kicking, inexpensive fun rounds or load hot for large game at close and medium range. Additionally, some day I may be able to add a .44 mag revolver to my collection again and there is just something cool about a revolver/carbine pair that take the same round.

4. Something chambered in a reasonably flat shooting medium bore round for longer range hunting and hunting larger game if I ever have that opportunity. I'm going back and forth on the ,338 win mag and the 9.3x62mm.

I'm intentionally avoiding military rounds and .30 cals as they tend to be harder hit by panic buying than the slightly more unusual stuff.

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Dr.Rob
January 19, 2013, 03:06 PM
1. Remington 12 ga. 3" 870 shotgun with 2 barrels. Easy to swap for any occasion. 21 inch with rifle sights, 26 inch vent rib- both with RemChoke. Everything from deer to ducks and doves.

2. 30-06. Wide variety of commercial ammo available, wide possibilities of rolling your own ammo. Enough gun for 99% of all North American Game. (some people think 8mm, 270, 308 are about equal to this task--some even say a .30-30 will do.)

3. Bigger rifle. .375 H&H for the other 1%, big bears, moose and exotics like muskox that most of us will never see of hunt.

4. Dedicated Varminter. Long range centerfire designed for varmints. .223 on a precision rifle, or heavy barreled 243, 25-06 etc. (benefit of 24 cal + is they are big game legal in Colorado and are dandy on antelope, but you can certainly take one with the aforementions 30-06)

RoboDuck
January 19, 2013, 03:15 PM
22-250
12 gauge
.308 Win.
.338 Win. Mag.

bannockburn
January 19, 2013, 03:50 PM
For grouse I usually preferred a lightweight 20 gauge with as short of a open choked barrel as I could find. I don't know what your budget is like so for now I would say go with versatility and look for a 12 gauge pump with the provision for adding extra barrels and choke tubes as the need arises.

In a .44 Mag carbine maybe see if you can find an older Marlin Model 1894 or else a Rossi Model 92. I have a Rossi in .45LC to go with my Ruger Vaquero and Beretta Stampede and it is one slick shooting little carbine.

As to hunting larger game, I would think something chambered in .338 Winchester would serve you very well for just about anything you might find on the North American continent.

Jason_W
January 19, 2013, 04:46 PM
I have the short barrel 12-gauge covered. I just need to replace the barrel with one threaded for tubes.

For the .44 mag, I have handled and was pleased with the Ruger 77/44 bolt action.

beatledog7
January 19, 2013, 04:51 PM
My non-22LR long gun battery includes these:

.223 Remington, .257 Roberts, 7mm RemMag, .357 Magnum, 45-70 Gov't, 12ga. My bases are covered pretty well, but I'll slip something more powerful in between the Big 7 and the 45-70 eventually. I'm currently thinking .338 WinMag.

gdcpony
January 19, 2013, 05:14 PM
.223- I handload it, so panic buys don't hurt me as much. Very adaptable and light kicking.

.257Roberts- Again I handload it in +P brass to modern specs and get awesome performance on predators and deer. I am actually building an AR in it soon. It replaced the 7x57 as my mid-long range shooter. I can match about any factory .308 "tactical" rifle with my old Mauser at any range.

20ga- I am a slug hunter so my H&R Ultra has the most kills in my current firearms arsenal. I have shot it out to short rifle range (226yds) and it just plain shoots.

1911- I know it is not a common hunting gun, but while I have yet to get a deer with it, there are several 'yotes that are cursing that thing from above right now.

I have to add my bow. I have killed far more deer with it than all others combined. I have also managed more than a few squirrel, 'yote, rabbit, and other game kills with it too. Something about being silent in the woods that I like.

CB900F
January 19, 2013, 06:25 PM
Jason;

I agree with obtaining a longer barrel for your 12 guage if the platform will support it. A second barrel is usually not all that expensive.

Therefore, centerfire rifles: If you don't already have an A/R, forget it, the present market is through the roof & headed to Mars. So, since you're a handloader, my first choice would be a modern 6.5 X 55 Swedish Mauser. Then the .338 Winchester magnum. Those two cover the bases quite nicely.

Which leaves room for the handgun of choice. Lot's of options available, but need may vary upon your location. Do you have large predators in the back 40? If not, then probably a .357 in one of several platforms. But if so then perhaps a .45 Colt or .44 magnum. Unless of course you're a masochist & want something that produces recoil in significant amounts. However, those do tend to be more expensive.

900F

doc2rn
January 19, 2013, 06:41 PM
I gotta go against the grain
Ruger Red Label SxS 20g
Winchester 30-30
Weatherby 30-06
Ruger 77/22 Mk II v-bolt .22WMR

Ford
January 19, 2013, 07:32 PM
1. Fastest lightest shotgun I have ever shot or owned is my Remington 1100 light special field. Is great for quail or pheasant. I use it more for quail though. Is a 20 ga.

2. My favorite shotgun. Benelli M2. If you feel the need to shoot 3 1/2 step up to the SBEII

3. You want a .44 mag Carbine/Revolver combo? Go Ruger.

4.Savage or Remington rifle chambered in .30-06 will kill anything in the US cleanly. 180-200gr bullets for Moose.

joeschmoe
January 19, 2013, 07:55 PM
28" 12ga = Nova
30.06 (Garand or bolt)
.357 mag 6"
.223 (AR or bolt)

That plus .22lr pistol/rifle should take every kind of game on earth.

22-rimfire
January 19, 2013, 08:04 PM
I would choose either the Remington 870 or Browning BPS for a field gun in 12 ga. Grew up shooting an Ithaca M37 and the Browning feels just about the same and has the botten ejection that I love.

I'd go with a 375 H&H over an 338. When you are dealing with that much recoil in a sporting rifle, I'd just go with the tried and true 375.

Have you considered a Marlin lever gun in 44 mag? They are nice handling little rifles.

Hard to beat a good 223 as a varmint rifle. If that isn't enough horse power, maybe the 243 win.

Old judge creek
January 19, 2013, 09:56 PM
... some excellent suggestions here. In my case I would choose the following:

Shotgun would be without a doubt a Mossberg 500 12 ga combo with a "short home defense barrel" and a longer ventilated rib "hunting barrel" with screw-in chokes.

My light rifle would be a Ruger M77 in 243.

My medium rifle would be a Ruger M77 RSI in 308.

My big bore rifle would be a pre-Remlin Marlin 45-70 Guide Gun.


And truth be told I'd be never be happy until I replaced my Marlin 1894 Cowboy Limited in 44 magnum, but I'd probably fill the first three hunting rifle slots with the choices listed above.

1911 guy
January 20, 2013, 12:13 AM
12 guage should be at the top of the list. Too versatile to ignore. most pumps and autoloaders, you can get a spare barrel to change application rather than getting another shotgun.

Since you're avoiding military calibers, go with a .243 bolt gun. Can be used for varmints and deer both. I personally prefer the .22 caliber centerfires for varmint, though.

Between the two large game cartridges you mention, the .338 and the 9.3, I'd opt for the .338 simply because 9.3 is practically unheard of in my neck of the woods. Might be different near you.

And I'm never one to talk someone out of owning a decent levergun.

Jason_W
January 20, 2013, 08:30 AM
I'm not too concerned with adding a centerfire varmint round. Long range varminting options are few and far between around here and that niche can be covered with rimfires and shotguns.

The reason the .44 carbine is near the top of my list is the round's versatility when handloading is factored in. Fat, straight-walled pistol rounds are fun and easy to load as well.

22-rimfire
January 20, 2013, 08:41 AM
Good reason for choosing the 44 mag. Now you just have to decide on a rifle.

I would love to own a 375 and have almost bought one at least 10x. But a little voice keeps telling me that it is a pure waste of money for me and I would be better off with something I might actually shoot every now and then. It would be different if I lived in AK.

Jason_W
January 20, 2013, 09:04 AM
Handloading adds a little more versatility to rounds like the .338 win and .375 H&H. You can load down fairly easily for deer sized game and go full power should you have a chance to hunt something bigger and tougher.

If I obtain a .338 win, I'll likely load it down to .338 Federal levels when hunting deer over clearcuts.

gbran
January 20, 2013, 10:17 AM
If I could only have four, this would have to be one of them. .223/12ga.

http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y145/gbran/CrossfireMK1.jpg

kludge
January 21, 2013, 12:04 PM
0. A rimfire is essential, but this is a freebie, thus it is number zero.
1. If you must have a shotgun get two barrels, or three.

Since you get four choices overall and three choices left, you get a dedicated small game caliber and a dedicated big game caliber and something in the middle that is versatile. Choose these rifles, action types, and lengths by the terrain and game most commonly hunted.

First, my big game caliber... a .338/.280AI, .35 Whelen, .350 Rem Mag, .325 WSM, .338 Win Mag, .338 Fed, .358 Win, .338 MX.

Second , my varmint/predator rifle... I'm thinking .204 Ruger, .223 Rem, .22-250, 6mm Rem, .243 Win

And last the do-it-all caliber... 7mm-08, .280, .284 Win, .260 Rem, 6.5x55, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5 Rem Mag, 6.5-.284, .270 Win, .264 Win Mag, .25-06, .25 WSSM

If you don't need a dedicated varmint rifle, and the do-it-all will take of your need for the occasional long range critter, then yes, a .44 Mag wold be a great do-it-all short range rifle, including the critters.

paintballdude902
January 22, 2013, 02:20 AM
12ga super back eagle

.223 bolt gun for varmints

.30-06 for deer

.375hh for biggins

TexasPatriot.308
January 22, 2013, 02:39 AM
you picked a bad time to buy firearms...unless you just dont care what you pay.

Manny
January 22, 2013, 04:06 AM
I followed your link to Lo-Fi outdoors and enjoyed the site. One comment though, the pics, while nice, when used as background for text often make it impossible to read the text of the article.

Your Nova tactical shotgun is a nice versatile piece that would be morso with a threaded or poly-chocked barrel. Briley or someplace similar should be able to fix you up there.

For a waterfowling gun I'd just get a second Nova with the appropriate barrel. It's not that much more than a spare barrel and I like redundency.

For a big game rifle, after reading your site, you reminded me of another practical outdoorsman, Marshall Stanton of Beartooth Bullets. His favorite hunting rifle is a Marlin in .444 Marlin. With the proper bullets it makes a 200 yard elk gun and utilizing handloads is a tremendously versatile rifle. He wrote a three part article that details his results with this rifle & cartridge that can be found here:

http://www.beartoothbullets.com/tech_notes/archive_tech_notes.htm/17

I'd skip the seperate .44 mag rifle, handload the Marlin .444 instead and get the .44 mag hand gun you're thinking of.

josiewales
January 22, 2013, 02:54 PM
Barret M82
Browning M-24
S&W 500
Winchester 1878 8 ga.


Well he said battery! :)

Scrumbag
January 22, 2013, 03:13 PM
1.) Shotgun: Combo barrel Mossberg 500 / Browning BPS / Benelli Supernova 12g (Short slug barrel with rifle sight and a multichoke for bird hunting)

2.) .222 or .22-250 for varmints / small stuff

3.) .270W for deer hunting

4.) .338-06 (Should be able to resize off same '06 brass as the the .270W. Although having said that, I really like my 9.3x62).

ATB,

Scrummy

cal30_sniper
January 22, 2013, 05:08 PM
For use strictly in North America, here's what I would pick:

1. 12 Gauge
2. .223, .44 Magnum, or .30-30
3. .308, .270 or .30-06
4. 300 Win Mag

They are all easy to get ammo for. That would be my number one concern.

12 gauge can be used as an all-purpose weapon to hunt just about anything under the sun. No arsenal is complete without one.

.223 is great for practice/plinking, a good sustenance rifle (doesn't waste much meat, nor is ammo expensive or hard to carry), or great for varmints. However, if you wanted a pistol caliber carbine, I would use replace the .223 on the list with it. The .44 Rifle will hunt all the same stuff with most of the same benefits. The only thing you lose is range, but knockdown power at short ranges is greatly increased. The .30-30 will do pretty much the same thing, and ammo is cheap and easy to find, but I think I'd rather have the .44 if you can find one.

.308 or .30-06 depending on your personal taste. The '06 is a bit better on performance, but can also more expensive to feed. Either round will work just fine to kill anything from varmints to moose and elk. Most say they would work sufficiently for anything on the North American continent, at least at shorter ranges. I tend to agree. If you're personal taste lies with a slightly smaller bore, you could easily insert the .270 here instead.

.300 Win Mag is your go to rifle if the ranges are longer or the beasts bigger than you feel comfortable hunting with the .308/.30-06. If you're not going to Africa, you don't need anything bigger. It's easier to find ammo for than any of the other big magnums, except maybe 7mm Rem Mag. If you reload, you get the added benefit of being able to use the same bullets as you load the .308 or .30-06 for in a pinch.

Now, if you want to get less practical, I would personally go with the following, because I like reloading for oddball calibers and old Mausers:

12 Gauge
244 Remington or 220 Swift
7x57
9.3x62

Same purposes as above, just a lot harder to find ammo for.

Jason_W
January 22, 2013, 06:19 PM
Some useful insight here. Thanks, all.

Now, for the hard part. Saving up for this little endeavor.

My two top priorities are obtaining a choke-tube threaded barrel for the Nova and then a .44 mag carbine.

I'm going back and forth between a Rossi '92 clone and the Ruger 77/44. I once owned a '92 and it was cool, but I'm thinking the 77/44 is a bit stronger, easier to clean, and more practical for hunting. Since it would be a dedicated hunting rifle, the l,low magazine capacity is not a concern.

kludge
January 22, 2013, 11:12 PM
I guess it depends on where and what you're hunting... a 16" barrel '92 sure is handy.

cal30_sniper
January 22, 2013, 11:56 PM
I'd say go with the 92. The 77/44 would be a better "dedicated hunting rifle," but that's what you have the bigger rifle for. I would think that the .44 would fill the slot of a carry anywhere and tackle anything kind of rifle. For myself, the lever handles much better than the Ruger as well. The Ruger might be a bit more accurate, but that's going to be lost on the ballistically imposed range of the .44 Carbine. You won't ever hurt the lever firing pistol rated loads through it either.

A Win 94 would be awesome, but the price has gone through the roof on those since they quite making them. Do the research and figure out who makes the best 92 clone in .44 and go with that. Alternatively, check out the Ruger lever guns and autoloaders that were made in .44. Any of those would make a super handy carbine.

juk
January 23, 2013, 02:33 AM
Mossberg 535, 12 ga, with 28" field barrel and 20" alternate barrel.
AR 15 in 223/556
Ruger M77 (tang safety) in 308
CZ 550 FS in 9.3x62

The only one I don't own is the CZ. I am comfortable with all of the others and trust them. I'm sure the CZ would be a fine addition, but for the life of me I can't find anything in Alabama that needs to be hit with the 9.3x62. lol If I lived in one of the heavily infested hog zones I would already have one. I would love to see what a stout 9.3x62 would do to a hog.

Scrumbag
January 23, 2013, 02:53 AM
I have a 9.3x62 FN Commercial. One heck of a piggy stopper...

Zardaia
January 23, 2013, 03:26 AM
Only need two, based on no intention of hunting the really big or dangerous game and no .22 for this thread. Note, this is need not want

1: 12g pump, long barrel/interchangable choke tubes. Covers everything from squirel-short range deer-birds

2: .270/308 for longer range deer sized game

Just for the sake of op 4guns

3: .223 for long range varmint

4: maybe a 12g with dedicated rifled barrel instead of just diff tubes for better performance

Ole Humpback
January 23, 2013, 12:47 PM
Well, I'm half way complete on the 4 gun list as I own two of them already:

1.) Browning Gold Fusion 12ga with choke tubes. This covers everything from small game to deer here in Indiana. (own)

2.) BLR in 257 Roberts. Great little 200yd+ setup for varmints and everything up to elk. (own)

3.) Model 70 Winchester in 375 H&H Mag. Need this for hog, bear, and larger deer species.

4.) Pedersoli 50 caliber Hawken Rifle for muzzleloader season.

Now, this list covers almost all my needs (98% ish), but I would need two more rifles to finish it:

5.) Weatherby Vanguard Sporter in 257 Wby Mag. Dedicated 200yd+ gun. The 257 Roberts would become a 200yd and under gun after this purchase.

6.) Pedersoli 1874 Sharps Sporting Rifle in 45-70. Theres quite a few places where I'd like to hunt that have some odd rules on rifles. The 45-70 would give me a lot of cheap custom options for hunting in different places.

joeschmoe
January 23, 2013, 01:43 PM
You can buy another shotgun for the price of a nova barrel.

oneounceload
January 23, 2013, 02:03 PM
Model 70 Winchester in 375 H&H Mag. Need this for hog, bear, and larger deer species.


May be a WANT, but there is no hog, deer species or bear outside of grizzly where this much gun is necessary - if you want it, go for it

You didn't say where you hunted grouse - but if it is in the thickets and coverts of NE, you'll want a nice and LIGHT 20 gauge, like an AyA SxS
Since that won't do for waterfowl that you mentioned, a 12 GAUGE SEMI becomes the next choice
For whitetail and down, including antelope, goats and sheep, the 257 WEATHERBY will do the job
For the larger critters like mulies to moose, the 30-06 gets the nod, or if including grizzly and polar, then a 338, or 9.3, or 375 - a bit much for all but the bears though

Ole Humpback
January 23, 2013, 05:52 PM
May be a WANT, but there is no hog, deer species or bear outside of grizzly where this much gun is necessary - if you want it, go for it


Theres a bit of logic there. Yes, a 375 H&H is overkill for anything in NA (other than grizzly's), but I am also interested in doing an Africa trip at least once in my life for buffalo and the 375 H&H gets the job done. And for the record, the 375 H&H is most powerful cartridge I can comfortably shoot. I would know, spent alot of time shooting a 405 Win from an 1895. A 9lb recoil pad equipped M70 Safari model 375 H&H is the ticket for me.

You didn't say where you hunted grouse - but if it is in the thickets and coverts of NE, you'll want a nice and LIGHT 20 gauge, like an AyA SxS
Since that won't do for waterfowl that you mentioned, a 12 GAUGE SEMI becomes the next choice
For whitetail and down, including antelope, goats and sheep, the 257 WEATHERBY will do the job
For the larger critters like mulies to moose, the 30-06 gets the nod, or if including grizzly and polar, then a 338, or 9.3, or 375 - a bit much for all but the bears though


Just curious, who is this directed at?

If its at me, I'll go down the list:

Northern Indiana is not NE, so a 12ga is easy to get around with. I've also taken my 12ga into the broken back country of SE KY and believe me that 12ga was the easiest thing to get around with.

Waterfowl here in NE IN happens in alot of wooded swamps unless you have about $6k worth of decoys for a farm field. Either way, I am very comfortable with my 12ga in tight quarters hunting.

Since Indiana doesn't allow rifles for deer hunting and all the places I go (MO, KY, IN, AR, MI, WI) generally have 200yds or less of clear shooting space, a 257 Roberts is just fine for me. Some places in IN allow for shooting out to 300yds for varmints which is pushing it for a Roberts which I why I would like the 257 Wby.

For the larger deer critters & bears, I agree with the 30-06. But theres no rifle in that caliber that I particularly like. Go to the 338/9.3 caliber and the rifles are out of my price range for a common use gun which was why I settled on the M70 Safari in 375 H&H.

Browning
January 23, 2013, 06:13 PM
I only need 3 really if we aren't counting rimfires.


Medium caliber scoped hunting rifle for deer.
AR with a 20' barrel free floated barrel and a Trijicon Accupoint TR22G 2.5-10x56 Scope
Semi 12 Ga. Shotgun for dove and clays.


There's one on the want list though :

Marlin lever or Winchester Trapper .44 Mag rifle

Jason_W
January 23, 2013, 06:21 PM
"You can buy another shotgun for the price of a nova barrel."

Technically true, I suppose.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/321377/carlsons-barrel-benelli-nova-supernova-12-gauge-3-1-2-18-1-2-ramped-front-sight

Dr.Rob
January 23, 2013, 07:13 PM
You know, the muzzle loader might be a better option than a heavy rifle for most people.

Mine is a .54 Hawken.

cal30_sniper
January 23, 2013, 07:59 PM
For the larger deer critters & bears, I agree with the 30-06. But theres no rifle in that caliber that I particularly like. Go to the 338/9.3 caliber and the rifles are out of my price range for a common use gun which was why I settled on the M70 Safari in 375 H&H.

Why not a Husqvarna 640 in 9.3x62? Built off a commercial FN Mauser action, D&T for scope with swept bolt handle, very accurate, excellent workmanship fit and finish (i.e., Swedish Mauser), and you can usually score them for $500 or so used on gunbroker. One comes up ever couple of weeks, sometimes with the scope included. That would make on heck of an Africa rifle

Ole Humpback
January 23, 2013, 09:59 PM
Why not a Husqvarna 640 in 9.3x62? Built off a commercial FN Mauser action, D&T for scope with swept bolt handle, very accurate, excellent workmanship fit and finish (i.e., Swedish Mauser), and you can usually score them for $500 or so used on gunbroker. One comes up ever couple of weeks, sometimes with the scope included. That would make on heck of an Africa rifle


Personally, I'm not a fan of cheap guns. However; I also don't require custom made guns either. My price point for quality vs price is a Browning or Winchester. Also, the standard for DG hunting without a Double Rifle is an M70 CRF action.

In regards to Africa, while the 9.3 can certainly do it, not all places allow it. Depending on where you hunt DG, your rifle cartridge will most likely have to meet certain minimum requirements (diameter & ME) or be approved by your PH prior to the hunt. And even if you meet the nations requirement for caliber & ME and your PH approves it, the locality you hunt in may have a bit more stringent requirement. Given that quite a few places still require a 375 H&H for DG, why not go with it especially if you know you can shoot it well?

cal30_sniper
January 23, 2013, 10:30 PM
I completely agree that the .375 H&H is a better all around choice. I was also aware that some places in Africa allowed the 9.3 for DG, while others still require the .375 as a bare minimum. I mentioned it because you had just said that you would go with a 9.3, but they were out of your price range. The custom and semi-custom built rifles you typically find in that caliber are very expensive, that is for certain. Was it the x62 you were referring to, or the more powerful x64? IIRC, the x64 is legal in a few more situations than the x62 is.

Also, for anyone else that may be considering this cartridge, the Husqvarna 640 is not a "cheap gun". It is a 100% original, controlled round feed, Mauser 98 action. In fact, during the entire run of 640 production from 1944 to 1953, Husqvarna didn't even make their own actions. They bought completed FN Herstal Model 98 actions and fitted them with barrels and stocks to be sold under the Husvarna name. The Mauser 98 was the standard that the Winchester Model 70 CRF was designed to try to meet, not the other way around. An FN commercial mauser is about as cream of the crop as it gets without going full custom. The Husqvarna is just that, with a different name stamped on the barrel.

Captcurt
January 25, 2013, 10:06 AM
223 bolt gun
30-06 bolt gun
20 ga o/u
12 ga pump

I have all of these now, could sell all of the rest and never look back.

JShirley
January 25, 2013, 10:48 AM
It's hard to go wrong with a .30-06. A 7mm Remington Mag is also good, but a little more expensive to shoot, and a bit more recoil.

sixgunner455
January 25, 2013, 10:54 AM
Well, what I would do is somewhat different than others. But that's normal for me.

I would get a 2 barreled pump or semiauto 20 or 12 guage, one long and one short. Reasons for it are obvious and you stated them in your OP - upland rabbit and birds, close range deer with slugs.

I consider your .44 Mag carbine to be redundant when you are going to have a short-barreled shotgun, but that's just me. If most of your available deer hunting is in brush, then either will work great for that kind of hunting, but if you are starting from no hunting guns, getting both at the same time is kind of redundant. Just wanting one is sufficient reason to get one, of course, but you have to recognize that the .44 isn't giving you any real increase in hunting capability when you will already be setting up a short barrel on the shotgun for slugs.

So, start with the 2 barrel package shotgun from Remington or Mossberg.

If the biggest game you will hunt now is deer, then pick a rifle that will give you that and coyotes and other varmints with little fuss. Get a .243, .260, 6.8, .257 Bob, .25-06, 7-08, or .270. Or something like that. You said you are avoiding getting a .30 cal at present due to panic buying drying up ammo. I would agree with that, with the exception of the .30-06, since that seems to be on the shelf everywhere around here, but that's probably a regional thing. It's not hunting season anymore here, so few people are thinking "buy a stack of that .30-06 for in case there's none of it in October." But the -06 is bigger than you need for deer and coyotes. If you just want one rifle for everything in North America, of course, then it's your Huckleberry.

Later on, as your hunting needs and finances increase, pick out your big rifle for that Africa or Alaska trip, and pick up that .44 carbine you're wanting.

My advice is to run your priorities for hunting guns like this: Just a shotgun w/2 barrels and necessary chokes, one good rifle that is adequate for your local game, and a .22, and you're set until you are going somewhere that requires something different, or until you've saved up enough to get stuff that is more of a 'want' than necessary to accomplish your 'needs'.

And of course, there is the muzzleloader if you are interested in hunting during one of those seasons, but you didn't mention that.

oneounceload
January 25, 2013, 12:14 PM
I would add, IF Africa DG is on the menu, you might want to step up the 375 to a 416. Friends who go to Africa a lot use them on DG, with the 300 or 375 for large plains game and a 243 or 25-06 for smaller plains game

JEB
January 25, 2013, 01:17 PM
for me the list would be as follows:

1) ruger m77 hawkeye (wood and blue) in 30-06. i already own this rifle and i am 99% sure that white tail deer is the largest game i will ever get a chance to hunt. if i ever do get the chance to go after moose (my dream hunt) i will simply load a better constructed bullet in the '06. i have no interest in shooting brown bear, or going to Africa, so the 30-06 is all i will ever need.

2) remington 11-87 12ga. with standard field barrel, short smooth bore barrel, and cantilever mount fully rifled barrel with 1-4x scope. this will easily cover all my shotgun needs. standard barrel for turkeys and clays, short barrel for HD, and the rifled barrel for deer hunting during shotgun only seasons.

3) ruger redhawk .44 magnum 5.5" barrel. i like to carry a sidearm whenever i am hunting and currently i am using a ruger super blackhawk in .44 magnum with a 7.5" bbl. for my purposes, the 5.5" bbl of the redhawk would be more than sufficient, as well as making it a little more compact. double action would be preferred for ease of loading and just in case i ever found myself hunting out west where i could find myself using it for critter defense.

4) this one is a bit of a toss-up. the first three would fill any hunting need i may ever have (with the exception of rimfires). good choices here would be an ar-15 in .223/5.56, or a smaller caliber bolt action rifle like a 7-08. the ar-15 would be good for varmints as well as HD and three gun shooting, and is just a great all around "fun gun." also you would have the option of swapping uppers later on if you wanted to go to a larger caliber more suitable for deer type game. this will get expensive though and i would more than likely never get around to actually dropping the cash to get different uppers. the 7-08 is one i have been thinking about very seriously for some time now. lighter recoil than the 30-06 and a nice flat trajectory would make this a very appealing hunting round. it would easily be able to cover anything the AR could do in a hunting situation, as well as double as a back-up rifle to the '06 for everything up to and including deer and even elk if the ranges are kept reasonable.

murf
January 25, 2013, 01:18 PM
1. rem 870 20 guage magnum

2. (pre 64) 270win model 70

3. ruger blackhawk in 45 long colt (4.625" bbl)

that's all i need.

murf

MCgunner
January 25, 2013, 02:06 PM
Praise the Lord I can still own more. If I had to pick from my current guns...

Mossberg 535 (doves to geese)

Remington M722 in .257 Roberts because it was my grandpas and I killed my first deer with it 49 years ago. It's all I really need with where and what I hunt now, hogs to deer.

Savage 110 in 7mm Rem Mag since I could use something bigger if I ever get to hunt elk or nilgai

Hmm, I have a 4th I can have and it can't be a rimfire? Cool, since the Mossberg is all I REALLY need (though I like my 20 gauge SxS on dove and my 10 on geese), I think I'd go with my Hawken Hunter Carbine for black powder fun. I like my CVA inline, but I have to have something primitive weapons legal.

I have hunting handguns, but I have to triage here.

MCgunner
January 25, 2013, 02:12 PM
BTW, a .357 carbine can handle squirrels to 50 yards (.38 light loads) to deer and hogs to 100 yards. Very versatile gun if you like versatility. But, I've had one for 25 yards and only ever shot one deer with it and usually hunt squirrel with either a .22 rifle or handgun.

627PCFan
January 25, 2013, 02:15 PM
For the varmint gun, kick it old school. Go 220 swift. Something unique but still available enough for handloading-

Girodin
January 25, 2013, 03:46 PM
If I were only going to have four. First of all I'd be very sad, then I'd get the following:

Before I give my list I'd like to outline my general underlining approach to my choices. In any king of one gun decision one must almost necessarily look to a compromise gun. That is to say a gun that must be able to do many things acceptably well, but as a result tends to not be the very best choice for anyone one task. Alternatively one can pick a gun that does specialize in what he or she will use it for the most and then accept its shortcomings in other areas. Lastly, if I am only going to own one gun I'm going to go all out so to speak. I would certainly want a very high quality gun and might be less concerned with price. I'd also like something kind of neat that offered "pride of ownership" if it is going to be the only one I have. I blend these approaches in my choices, sometimes opting for the generalist and sometimes picking a specialist because that is what I realistically would use the gun for most of the time.

The List:

1.Caesar Guerini Ellipse EVO 12 guage Shotgun

http://www.gueriniusa.com/gun_models/ellipse_evo/images/EllipseEVO.jpg

I was tempted to pick a Benelli auto loader as a gun that could do it all from clays, to upland game, to water foul and Turkey. However, what I like to hunt the most is upland game, pheasants in particular. As such, I'd get a gun primarily for that. If I'm only going to have one shotgun, a nice O/U seems to be fitting. The Caesar Guerini Apex Sporting is not cheap. However, it is very well made, a great shooter and simply a gorgeous gun. Budget choice would be a browing Citori.

2. Custom .22-250 with a Schimt and Bender Scope. I would need a Varmint gun. I would be very torn between a Larue OBR and a custom 22-250 bolt gun. Most of my hunting would be for yotes or jackrabbits. I'd probably get the 22-250 simply because I love the cartridge and have some what of an emotional attachment to it as well, my father used to hunt with one and it was the gun he taught me to shoot and hunt with. The scope is really needed because yotes are often hunted when the light is low. Plus if one is only going to have a couple rifles there is no reason not to have really good glass on them.

3. Pre 64 Winchester M70 in 30'06 with a Schimt and Bender scope. My NA big game rifle This was my grandpa's deer gun. It is still very adequate for everything I have ever hunted and the vast majority of what I am likely to ever hunt. Although there are newer, fancier, more wiz bang, calibers and guns this will realistically do everything or very nearly everything I need a big game rifle. Plus its was my grandpa's (although if I was starting from scratch I'd be really tempted to get a 6.5x55 Swede).

4. An M70 Chambered in 375 H&H for a Big/Dangerous game rifle. Some day I might choose to go hunt in Africa or hunt big bears or the like in NA. This gun would cover anything I might ever hunt. Plus I just have always thought they were neat guns. I could use it on Elk etc, and not feel absurd. When I get serious about buying one of these I may choose a different rifle when I really research it out we will see.

lefteyedom
January 25, 2013, 11:32 PM
12 gauge, 3 barrels, rifle slug, 20" and 26" both with screw in choke.
223. varmint rifle
260 deer rifle, 20" barrel compact
300 win mag for everything else

Ole Humpback
January 26, 2013, 03:03 PM
I completely agree that the .375 H&H is a better all around choice. I was also aware that some places in Africa allowed the 9.3 for DG, while others still require the .375 as a bare minimum. I mentioned it because you had just said that you would go with a 9.3, but they were out of your price range. The custom and semi-custom built rifles you typically find in that caliber are very expensive, that is for certain. Was it the x62 you were referring to, or the more powerful x64? IIRC, the x64 is legal in a few more situations than the x62 is.

I was actually looking at rifles chambered for 9.3x74R. I didn't know other chamberings existed in 9.3.

Also, for anyone else that may be considering this cartridge, the Husqvarna 640 is not a "cheap gun". It is a 100% original, controlled round feed, Mauser 98 action. In fact, during the entire run of 640 production from 1944 to 1953, Husqvarna didn't even make their own actions. They bought completed FN Herstal Model 98 actions and fitted them with barrels and stocks to be sold under the Husvarna name. The Mauser 98 was the standard that the Winchester Model 70 CRF was designed to try to meet, not the other way around. An FN commercial mauser is about as cream of the crop as it gets without going full custom. The Husqvarna is just that, with a different name stamped on the barrel.

I didn't know that Husqvarna was that good. The last time I saw a Husqvarna gun was at a tractor supply a few years ago and it both looked an felt cheap for even a single shot 12ga.

Learned something that is both new & useful. Definitely more food for thought here.

I would add, IF Africa DG is on the menu, you might want to step up the 375 to a 416. Friends who go to Africa a lot use them on DG, with the 300 or 375 for large plains game and a 243 or 25-06 for smaller plains game

Let me clarify my DG hunting desires. I only had a cape buffalo hunt in mind for DG and thats it as those are about the only types of hunts I can see myself both doing and being able to afford. I have no desire to hunt elephant, lion, rino, or any of the other DG species. Too rich for my blood.

Also, a 375 is about the largest gun I can handle. No point in having a larger more powerful rifle that I know I can't handle or shoot well.

Jason_W
January 26, 2013, 03:44 PM
I consider your .44 Mag carbine to be redundant when you are going to have a short-barreled shotgun, but that's just me. If most of your available deer hunting is in brush, then either will work great for that kind of hunting, but if you are starting from no hunting guns, getting both at the same time is kind of redundant. Just wanting one is sufficient reason to get one, of course, but you have to recognize that the .44 isn't giving you any real increase in hunting capability when you will already be setting up a short barrel on the shotgun for slugs.

Ballistically speaking, I agree. That being said, I do have a considerable supply of powder, primers, and components leftover from the last time I owned a .44. That's part of my reason for wanting one. Additionally, A handloader can make some .44 loads that are actually fun to shoot. It's hard to make a 12 ga slug load that won't get old real fast.

For longer range stuff, I wish I could just stick with the .308. It's probably good for everything in Maine and I already have a gun chambered in it. I just have a feeling it will be a few years (if ever) before ammo and components for the common rounds is easy to come by.

witchhunter
January 26, 2013, 09:05 PM
I love this stuff! There are so many variables, here you go though.
Remington 870 12 gauge with two barrels, one slugger and one with tubes.
Bolt guns of your choice in:
.223 or .22/250
.30/06 or 7mm Mag
.375 H&H or .338 WM
That would cover just about anything except a .22

txcookie
January 28, 2013, 11:56 PM
270 win for elk and down
30.06 for everything
remington 870 for everything that flys
223 for fun and carmints

if you wanted a pistol through in the 9mm and remove the 223

T.R.
January 30, 2013, 09:13 AM
- Marlin 30-30 for deer in the forests & foothills
- Savage .308 for large game
- CVA Optima 50 caliber ML for restricted zones
- TC flintlock in 45 caliber for late season deer

Deer_Freak
January 31, 2013, 02:42 PM
I am making this selection based on the availability of ammo. There seems to be plenty of 270 ammo on the market. The 270 is more versatile than a 243. The OP can go to Walmart and get a Ruger American for $350 chambered in 270. I don't see how he can go wrong unless he is recoil sensitive. A 270 does kick like a mule.

cal30_sniper
February 2, 2013, 06:27 PM
A 270 does kick like a mule.

I've never really heard anybody say that before. My .270 certainly doesn't kick like a mule, and it doesn't even have a recoil pad. It's a bit more stout than my 7x57, but not anything like my .30-06 or 7mm Rem Mag kicked (in heavier rifles with recoil pads, nonetheless).

HankB
February 2, 2013, 06:44 PM
A four-gun hunting battery . . .

1. 12 ga shotgun. Benelli M1S90. Just fine for anything that requires either birdshot or slugs.

2. .223 for varmints. A good AR-pattern rifle is more accurate than all but the very best bolt action rifles, and if it won't reach out like a 22/250 or .22 Swift, it won't burn out the barrel as quick either, and it can be fired faster.

3. .30/06. An old standby, very common, this round is a good choice for all thin-skinned, non-dangerous game worldwide with the possible exception of giraffe and eland.

4. .375 H&H. Many elephants have fallen to this round, and unless you're an African PH or plan to hunt many elephants, this is a great choice.

RonDeer10mm
February 3, 2013, 05:55 PM
.35 whelen

Jason_W
February 4, 2013, 02:07 PM
Now I'm eyeing the 6.5x55 as my longer range choice. I used to have a sporterized M38 that I foolishly sold during a bout of youthful shortsightedness. From what I remember, the round outperforms what anything that light-kicking should.

It's more than moose capable with the right loads and the chances of me getting to hunt anything larger elsewhere are pretty much nil for the foreseeable future. Also, it doesn't take a .308 dia. bullet which is an advantage during panic times.

It's a good thing I don't actually have money right now. Otherwise, my indecisiveness would really be annoying.

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