7mm or 300


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All4eyes
January 21, 2013, 08:28 PM
I am looking for a new rifle for elk hunting, with an effective kill range to 600 yds. I currently have a .30-06 Remington 760 pump. The pump shoots very well, but I can't attach a bipod. So what would you seasoned elk hunters recommend? This might also be used for mule deer.

On a side note I currently shoot 300 plus for practice, and want to stretch that out with a little mor gun. Thanks.

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All4eyes
January 21, 2013, 08:32 PM
I am looking for a new rifle for elk hunting, with an effective kill range to 600 yds. I currently have a .30-06 Remington 760 pump. The pump shoots very well, but I can't attach a bipod. So what would you seasoned elk hunters recommend? This might also be used for mule deer.

On a side note I currently shoot 300 plus for practice, and want to stretch that out with a little mor gun. Thanks.

Also is there better options that I am overlooking?

lefteyedom
January 21, 2013, 08:49 PM
Bolt action (savage or Stevens)
300 Win Mag with a 4X12 scope,
180 grain bullets
zero it in for 4" high at 100,5" high at 200, zero at 300, -11 at 400, -30 at 500
tape the data to the stock
practise at your 300 yard range tell you master it

Buy a really good range finder

helotaxi
January 21, 2013, 09:37 PM
The ballistics are almost identical assuming that you can get an extra 100 fps out of the .300 since the 7mm has the BC advantage assuming bullet of the same type and with similar sectional densities. Both would be moving at about 2,000fps at 600 yds and the terminal effects would be indistinguishable. Both would result in a dead elk. The only real difference is that the 7mm would recoil less. It would be my choice for that reason alone. The .300 doesn't offer anything to justify the extra recoil.

Eleanor416Rigby
January 21, 2013, 10:03 PM
deleted

jmr40
January 21, 2013, 10:05 PM
Out to 400 yards a 160 gr 7 mag bullet and a 180 gr 300 bullet are almost identical in trajectory, with the 300 having a slight edge in energy. At around the 400 yard mark the energy evens up and at any range longer than 400 yards the 7 mag shoots flatter, has more energy, and less recoil because of the more aerodynamic bullets. On paper I have to give the edge to the 7 mag. But I'd choose the 300 WSM if I wanted a magnum. Hard to explain exactly why, I just like it better. Sometimes you just throw out logic.

I haven't run the numbers, but a 200 gr bullet from a 300 will beat the 7's in energy at any range and be pretty close in trajectory. This is where the .30's are the most aerodynamic. At extreme ranges you need a good range finder and if you know how, you can always compensate for a little more drop.

I've had 'em all. I won't be shooting beyond 400 yards, so a 30-06 with good handloads would work just fine for me. If it were me, I'd keep things simple and either add another quality bolt rifle in 30-06 or trade the pump for one. If you are looking for a 600 yard elk gun you need to be honest with yourself. Are you really good enough to shoot that far? A properly loaded 30-06 will do at 500 yards exactly the same as the magnums will do at 600. And with a lot less expense and recoil.

helotaxi
January 21, 2013, 10:12 PM
Even at it's best, the .300 isn't very efficient from an aerodynamic standpoint. If I wanted something more than a 7mm Mag (I shoot a WSM) I'd skip the .300 and go to a .338 of some type. At least then I get more efficient bullets for the extra recoil as well as a significant increase in energy. For elk, you simply don't need more than the 7 mags offer.

a-sheepdog
January 21, 2013, 10:43 PM
I think either will serve you okay, but at 600 yards, the 300 will have an edge and gets my nod. I currently use a 338 Win Mag for elk, but would not hesitate to use a 300 Win Mag.

Art Eatman
January 21, 2013, 10:49 PM
If you're really competent at doping the wind, an '06 would work. That's also assuming equipment such as a laser range finder, since any cartridge's trajectory goes all basketball at 600.

If you're not really competent at doping the wind, common sense says to try very hard to stay at 400 yards or less.

mdauben
January 21, 2013, 11:32 PM
I am looking for a new rifle for elk hunting, with an effective kill range to 600 yds
I take it from this that you are an exceptional marksman? Most of the hunters I know should not be shooting at anything beyond 300 yards, if that. Assuming you are up to the challenge, I think for elk I would give the nod to the .300 magnum.

d2wing
January 22, 2013, 09:43 AM
I agree with jmr, 7mm mag or .300 WSM. For max range. A good 30-06 will do well, not quite as flat as the other two. And use a good range finder and chart.
Beyond 400 yards is where you really have to know the range, drop and you may have to account for wind and elevation. I know nothing about .338 s.

All4eyes
January 22, 2013, 06:12 PM
I like to shoot distance, with that being said I prefer to shoot 100 yds or less, but I have a once in a lifetime chance on private trophy land and I don't want to feel limited on options.
I want to have every possibly advantage I can get. I have thought of the .30-06 in a bolt, but do not have a magnum in the safe and would like to play with it on the bench. Doping the wind is a pain, but bullet drop is consistent. That's why I am asking about the magnums. This will more then likely be in a Remington 700 action, and will be hand loaded for. Keep the info flowing.

cal30_sniper
January 22, 2013, 06:41 PM
You're getting into the range where you're starting to necessitate really powerful ballistics. Have you thought about going ahead and going a step bigger and getting a 7mm STW, 7mm RUM, or 7mm Weatherby Magnum? They were all three designed for what you're talking about. I think you could get away with it with either the 7mm Rem Mag or 300 Win Mag if you do your part as a marksman, but the other three give you a bit more margin for error due to flatter trajectories. You'd have to work the ballistics tables yourself to see whether or not it would be worth it, but for a once in a lifetime hunt such as you're talking about, it's something worth looking into.

joed
January 22, 2013, 07:03 PM
I used to own 2 very nice bolt action rifles, one was a Remington Classic in .300 H&H Mag and a Winchester 70 XTR in 7mm RM. Had both for about 2 years.

After 2 years I kept the .300 mag and sold the 7mm RM. Why? Simple, the .300 mag kicked less, shot bullets from 110 gr to 220 gr. The 7mm RM shot bullets from 125 gr to 175 gr. Bottom line is the 7mm just wasn't as versatile in my opinion.

I miss that Winchester but not the 7mm RM.

skiking
January 22, 2013, 07:52 PM
Either would be fine. They are practically ballistic twins out as far as anybody should be shooting at game. I prefer the .300 Win Mag for the heavier bullets, I shoot 200 gr accubonds at just over 2900 fps.

Flatbush Harry
January 22, 2013, 08:16 PM
I've shot both. When I want to hunt big stuff, I use my .375 H&H; when I want a nice 250-yard+ shooter, I'm going to use my 7mm RM (new acquisition). I've relied on .30-06 in the past for this...it keeps enough energy to get the job done as far as I'm willing to take a shot and the 7mm RM doesn't kick any harder than the .30-06.

FH

All4eyes
January 22, 2013, 10:08 PM
I did look at the 7mm stw, and was a little intrigued with the ballistics. My main concern was finding brass for it in these scarce times, let alone finding loaded rounds. The ultra ages are a possibility but not sure I want the recoil from them. Any ultra mag shooters can chime in here it would be appreciated. You guys are tilting me towards the 300, but now I need to look at the other options you offered. Thanks and keep it coming.

forestdavegump
January 22, 2013, 10:24 PM
To old to carry a bull elk that far. I like to be at 60 yards instead, either we do at that range.:scrutiny:
I found 7mm cheaper right now $25 vs $33 fwiw

calapooia
January 23, 2013, 08:37 AM
I have a 300 Win mag, a 300 WSM, and 7mm Rem. For me 600 yards is way to far to shoot. Elk are tough. I have shot several with the 300 WSM and have had little reaction to the hit. They did go downandout within 50 to 75 yards thought. But They were less than 200 yrads whenI pulled the trigger.

My opinion, get a Browning A bolt with the BOSS system. You will have the recoil of a 308 and the power of a 300 WSM with the BOSS on at the range. When hunting remove the boss becauseyou will not notice the recoil with that bull in your scope. 7mm is my second choice. The 300 win mag just has too much recoil for practice.

Lloyd Smale
January 23, 2013, 08:46 AM
either will get the job done IF YOU CAN

HarcyPervin
January 23, 2013, 02:51 PM
When hunting remove the boss becauseyou will not notice the recoil with that bull in your scope.

Have you noticed any change in POI when removing the Boss?

MachIVshooter
January 23, 2013, 03:04 PM
Barring perfect circumstances, I wouldn't shoot at an elk 600 yards off with my 8mm mag, which has a definite edge over the 7mm RM and .300 WM. That's just a long, long shot for big game. I'll shoot at varmints that far and more, but being off by 6" or 8" is a complete miss on a prairie dog, while it's a wounding shot on an elk.

Dthunter
January 23, 2013, 03:35 PM
Use what your heart desires. They both will do the same thing. Kill big game.
Hunting is hunting, long range shooting isnt hunting. If you plan on just target shooting, the target doesnt care how many MOA your scope was adjusted.

If you are long range hunting, you also have to plan for the bullets adequate performance at the ranges you deem as your maximum.

I really enjoy shooting both past 1000 yards. So far the 168gr. VLD shoots best for me in my 7RemMag.
The 210gr. Berger Vld, and 230grain Berger Hybrid shoot unbelievably well out to 2000yards.

Some day this spring I will see how the 7mmRemMag shoots out to 1760yards.

Fun stuff this shooting!

If you are going to long range hunt, good luck. Its not like it is on T.V.
Been there/done that. It takes a tremendous amount of "timing" as well as skill to make those shots. You really have to study the conditions "competantly" before squeezing that trigger! I tend to keep my long range shooting and hunting apart.

All4eyes
January 23, 2013, 04:15 PM
Guys do not get me wrong I am not by any means planning on shooting 600 yds, that is worst case scenario. I do know that the average shot where I am going is 400 yds. I am one that has hunted more then many will get a chance to, and know my limits. I just want to be able if if need be. I do shoot a lot to 300, and will most likely have a few hundred rounds to 5 and 600, so my charts as as accurate as can be. I will be hand loading for maximum accuracy. I know the chances of wounding at that distance, but have seen a lot of wounded animals under 100 also. Thanks for the input,and again keep it rolling. As of now I am leaning on a 7mm, but I need to look at the charts a little more to settle my mind. I do like the idea of the BOSS system, but as stated earlier does it change the poi.

Clark
January 23, 2013, 04:48 PM
I have 338WM, 300WM, and 7mmRM reamers.
If I play with Quickload, the 338 can bring the most energy to the target at close ranges, the 300WM at medium ranges, but the most energy and flattest trajectory is the 7mmRM when it gets out past ~~400 yards.

calapooia
January 23, 2013, 06:04 PM
Harcy, no I have not noticed anychange of impact. MY browning A bolt in 300WSM loves the Winchester 180 grain XP3 factory load. They go at 2980 to 3000 on the chrony and shoot subMOA for 3 shots.(When I do my part) My Boss setting is #1. I have switched the boss and the non boss at the range and seen no diffrence i impact.

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