Heritage Arms Rough Riders... Any good?


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Inebriated
January 26, 2013, 08:41 AM
So admittidly, this is a pure and simple impulse buy. But I'm probably going to go pick up a .22 LR/.22 Mag Rough Rider later today. The one they have is the satin 6.5" barrel model.

So what do you guys think? Decent enough gun for the money? Do they hold up after a lot of use? I was planning on a Ruger Single Ten, but I've been wanting something in .22 Mag, and this covers both both at a lower price. Since I'm thinking .22LR/Mag guns, do you think the Ruger Single Six Convertible would be a better way to go?

Opinions and insight are welcome.

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CraigC
January 26, 2013, 08:45 AM
Not really.

WCraven
January 26, 2013, 09:02 AM
My borther inlaw has a RR in 10" with adjustable sites which he had to order it, my slainless steel Ruger Six Single with 6.5" barrel will shoot tighter groups as we have compared them.

If you go Ruger then buy a used one at your LGS as i would think they stand behind there guns even used, a slainless steel model like mine should run around $400 used.

Inebriated
January 26, 2013, 09:08 AM
WCraven, yeah, I would likely go used on the Ruger. In the few minutes since I've posted this thread, I've sort of sold myself on a stainless single-six lol.

But I was wondering about accuracy. I don't expect much out of a $200 gun, but how were the group sizes, and what distance?

CraigC
January 26, 2013, 09:14 AM
Of the very few bench testing reports I've seen on Heritage, accuracy has not been very impressive. As I recall, three to four inches at 25yds was the best I've seen. A good Single Six should easily halve that and many will do an inch with preferred loads.

Inebriated
January 26, 2013, 09:18 AM
Good to know. Also somewhat expected.

And maybe I'm putting too much thought in it, but would the extra .002" diameter in the barrel to accommodate the WMR affect the LR? As in, would the convertible S6 with LR shoot as well as a dedicated S6 with LR? More of an academic question, than anything. Also, I'm just assuming that the barrel has a larger diameter. I don't know.

CraigC
January 26, 2013, 09:24 AM
IMHO, way too much has been made about the compromise bore of a .22 Single Six convertible. Personally and this is just theory, I think that the way Ruger cuts their chambers has way more to do with the Single Six's accuracy than the bore diameter. We must also remember that these were never meant to be target pistols like the Colt Officer's and K-22's of old.

There hasn't been a dedicated .22LR Single Six since ~1968. All since that time have had the same barrels, convertible or not.

WCraven
January 26, 2013, 09:27 AM
I shot his RR better then he did and maybe 15 yards but this was a 10" barrel , i would take my Ruger anyday over it, i took my CCW class with it (my Ruger) useing the 22WMR and the teacher said he would have to fail me (joking)because he couldn't count 21 shots out of 30 as most was in the same bullet hole which was 21' foot

When you look for a Single Six go by the serial number as there date coded by the first 3 number which Ruger has it on the site, i lucked up and got a 1986 model 261-XXXXX 261 mean 1986 and it's like new..


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/012-1.jpg

WCraven
January 26, 2013, 09:34 AM
target pistols like the Colt Officer's and K-22's of old

When i think of target pistols it's more like T/C Contender with a 10" superbull barrel which i have owned before in 22lr if you want a real target pistol.

CraigC
January 26, 2013, 09:41 AM
S&W's and Colt's were the gold standard when revolvers were used for bullseye shooting.

The point being that Rugers are built to different standards and should not be expected to shoot as well as a S&W or Colt. Not what constitutes a "target pistol".

WCraven
January 26, 2013, 09:47 AM
I had to poke at you some..lol but i know what your saying..

I had a 1993 model T/C with a scope and the trigger is adjustable, that thing would shoot half inch groups @ 50 yards with the 22lr and my 14" 35 Remington barrel was just as good.

WCraven
January 26, 2013, 10:07 AM
Here is my new RIA 1911 in 45acp with fixed G.I. sights as i needed some range time with it and i'm getting older (46) it needs a trigger job (IMHO and that recoil) this was cheap 230 FMJ ball ammo @ 10 yards (8 shots) just to gave you idea of how i shoot, the Ruger would out shoot this gun all day.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/014_zps5a2578fb.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v400/crazycrave/016-2_zpsf260adfd.jpg

bucktails
January 26, 2013, 10:28 AM
I would take the Ruger any day over the RR. But, that being said, I have a RR and for the money its just fine. My kids and grandkids shoot it all the time and I dont have to worry about it getting banged up or scrached. The Ruger on the other hand only fits in my hand. The RR is a good little shooter for the money.

CraigC
January 26, 2013, 10:42 AM
My kids and grandkids shoot it all the time and I dont have to worry about it getting banged up or scratched. The Ruger on the other hand only fits in my hand. The RR is a good little shooter for the money.
I think that's a good purpose for them and can understand having one for that.

Inebriated
January 26, 2013, 10:59 AM
IMHO, way too much has been made about the compromise bore of a .22 Single Six convertible. Personally and this is just theory, I think that the way Ruger cuts their chambers has way more to do with the Single Six's accuracy than the bore diameter. We must also remember that these were never meant to be target pistols like the Colt Officer's and K-22's of old.

There hasn't been a dedicated .22LR Single Six since ~1968. All since that time have had the same barrels, convertible or not.
Well I didn't know that they didn't have dedicated S6's. But yeah, like I said, just curious. I looked up some groups that people get with them, and can't complain. Long as it'll hit a golf ball at 25 yards, it's good enough for my purposes!

Nice shooting, WCRaven.

MedWheeler
January 26, 2013, 11:38 AM
I'm with Bucktails on the general purpose of the RR. I have one I bought in November, and I really enjoy it. I haven't shot it beyond about fifteen yards, though, and I have not shot it outdoors. It's crisp, feels nice in the hand, and reliable.

But, I have not shot a Ruger. If I had one, the two guns would likely fill the roles Bucktails has his in: one as a "knock-around" gun, and the other as a "feel-good" one.

RaceM
January 26, 2013, 11:55 AM
Nothing wrong with a Rough Rider. Decent gun for the money, but not as good quality as a Ruger. Lockup is tight, but the finish wears quickly.

The accuracy issue with a Rough Rider is the front sight. It is way too thin, making it difficult to pick up against some backgrounds. From what I've read here and elsewhere it is not uncommon for the front sight to be off center yielding poor accuracy. Mine shot low and left until I pulled the front sight off and replaced it with a 3/32" thick one of my own making. Dead nuts on now out to 25'.

nswtex
January 26, 2013, 12:21 PM
For regular use, frequent plinking go Ruger for sure. I picked up a Rough Rider for my boys on Black Friday from academy for 99 bucks. They love it, and I couldn't pass on the price.

BCCL
January 26, 2013, 01:00 PM
Same here, my LGS has the RR's on sale last week, so I picked up a 6.5" version. I already have a Ruger SS, but thought what the heck, I'll try one. Hopefully get to the range next week to test it out.

http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m103/Bear_Claw_Chris_Lappe/Firearms/Western%20Guns/RoughRider-1R_zps063c5a90.jpg

Yarddog
January 26, 2013, 01:20 PM
Same here, my LGS has the RR's on sale last week, so I picked up a 6.5" version. I already have a Ruger SS, but thought what the heck, I'll try one. Hopefully get to the range next week to test it out.

http://i102.photobucket.com/albums/m103/Bear_Claw_Chris_Lappe/Firearms/Western%20Guns/RoughRider-1R_zps063c5a90.jpg
I was fixin to say,, That gun was notshot much, as it looks new ; )
Y/D

xxjumbojimboxx
January 26, 2013, 01:31 PM
The rough rider is like 175 at academy right now. Its not a tack driver, but its a .22... SO.. what is it for other then cheap plinking anyway? The ruger is a fine pistol, but... well, I just cant see myself dumping more money on a .22 then I have to :) The rough riders hold up as well, they're not prone to breaking or anything. Id go with the RR

Ohio Gun Guy
January 26, 2013, 03:57 PM
They are fine.... YES there are nicer 22 pistols... but for 150 +/- mine shots good and is fun. I too let the kids shoot it.

strange246
January 26, 2013, 08:56 PM
Got 2 at Christmas, one for me and one for my son, consecutive serial numbers, birds head grips and less than $300 for both...We shot them last weekend, well worth the $$!

C5rider
January 27, 2013, 08:34 AM
Here's a thread that I did on my RR and SS.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=640428

Hope it helps.

CajunBass
January 27, 2013, 08:55 AM
It seems everytime someone asks about a Rough Rider, people jump in and say something like "Get a Ruger...it's a better gun."

Really? No kidding? The Ruger costs about twice what a Rough Rider does, maybe a little more than twice. Even used they're a lot more than a Rough Rider is new. It had better be a "better" gun.

For what they cost the Rough Rider apparently does a good job. I've never shot one, but I've looked at them a couple of times. My wife has expressed some interest in one with IIRC, about a 3" barrel and fake pearl birdshead grips. I might have to get her one just to see what they're like. The only reason i haven't already is we've got a half dozen 22 handguns around here now.

bikerdoc
January 27, 2013, 09:30 AM
I got one. It works well and newbies use it to learn basics. They have magical powers to put big smiles on peoples faces for not a lot of money.

CraigC
January 27, 2013, 11:47 AM
Really? No kidding? The Ruger costs about twice what a Rough Rider does, maybe a little more than twice. Even used they're a lot more than a Rough Rider is new. It had better be a "better" gun.
Considering that I paid $200, $225 and $250 for three of my Single Sixes, I don't consider a used Ruger to be a huge upcharge. Besides, would you rather spend $250-$300 on something good that will last several lifetimes or waste $150-$200 on something crappy?

Jlr2267
January 27, 2013, 11:53 AM
Besides, would you rather spend $250-$300 on something good that will last several lifetimes or waste $150-$200 on something crappy?
What's "crappy" about a $150 RR?

CraigC
January 27, 2013, 11:54 AM
Everything.

Racinbob
January 27, 2013, 11:57 AM
I could be wrong but I'm thinking a decent used Ruger SS would run about twice what a RR costs new. I hate the phrase 'for the money' but the RR is definitely a very good gun for the money. No, not a Ruger but a good value.

Jlr2267
January 27, 2013, 12:01 PM
Everything.

Price isn't crappy.
The fact that they shoot well isn't crappy
So, I would say "everything" is not crappy

DNS
January 27, 2013, 01:06 PM
Bought a used one four years back and surprisingly it shoots very well. Finish is crap and obviously not all steel but neithers a lot of carry guns nowadays.

Mines 22lr, no mag cylinder. If you really want a convertible then I'd save up for a Ruger. The Ruger will last several lifetimes and its all steel to handle magnum loads.

CajunBass
January 27, 2013, 01:37 PM
Considering that I paid $200, $225 and $250 for three of my Single Sixes, I don't consider a used Ruger to be a huge upcharge. Besides, would you rather spend $250-$300 on something good that will last several lifetimes or waste $150-$200 on something crappy?

Yea, I've paid that much for them a couple of years ago too. They had a couple in the case at my LGS the other night when I was in. They're tagged closer to $400.00 these days ($399.99). I might be able to talk them down to $350.00 but that's still a long way from what a RR costs.

Which would I rather have? I'd rather have the Ruger. I've got a Ruger for that matter. That's not the question. I suspect most people would RATHER have a Ruger. The question is "Is the Rough Rider a decent enough gun for the money."

I think it is. You don't. No problem.

CraigC
January 27, 2013, 03:14 PM
Price isn't crappy.
The price is great, what you get for it is not.

Zinc (pot metal) frame and grip frame.

"Micro-threaded", press-fit barrel held in place with adhesive.

Ugly, unnecessary safety.

Plastic ejector prone to breakage.

Gritty action.

Spray on finish.

Mediocre accuracy.

Bottom of the barrel but at least it's cheap. If you can't afford a $250-$300 used Single Six, you sure as hell can't afford to throw away $150 on a Heritage. Save your pennies, buy something good, thank me later.

BCCL
January 27, 2013, 04:17 PM
Not all Rough Rider .22's have a zinc frame, they make them in steel for sales in states that have ridiculous "low melting point"/"Saturday night special" laws. Illinois has that law,and the new RR I just bought as a steel frame.

xxjumbojimboxx
January 28, 2013, 12:18 AM
Craig you got a really good deal on those single sixes.. try finding a deal like that today, My RR is made of steel too btw, and honestly, it so big and heavy, i dont see it breaking under the usage of the gun... maybe if i chuck it at a boulder or something... But, Im not going to do that!.. I take very good care of all my guns, the valuable ones, and the cheap ones... Proper maintenace will provide you with a Rough Rider that could last generations as well. Look at it this way. I have an H&R pull pin revolver, that waeighs a third of what the RR weighs, and that thing has been plinking since the 60's.. literally, its all about how you care for it.

CraigC
January 28, 2013, 10:32 AM
I see them go for less than $300 on Gunbroker all the time. IMHO, some folks would rather buy the Heritage that's readily available than look for a good Single Six.


Proper maintenace will provide you with a Rough Rider that could last generations as well.
If you shoot it very little, I'm sure it will last a while too. I shoot the hell out of my Single Sixes. My 50yr old Old Model has at least 30,000rds through it over the 12-13yrs I've owned it and I seriously doubt a Rough Rider will last as long.

The steel Heritage uses for their guns is the lowest grade used anywhere in firearm's manufacture, 12L14. There are some that don't believe it should even be used in muzzleloaders. Chosen for its ease of machining. Ruger uses the same steels they use in Blackhawks and Super Blackhawks.

Jlr2267
January 28, 2013, 12:19 PM
The price is great, what you get for it is not.

Zinc (pot metal) frame and grip frame.

It's a 22, the frame isn't gonna break...well, I've never seen one break



"Micro-threaded", press-fit barrel held in place with adhesive.

Ugly, unnecessary safety.

I've never seen or heard of a loose or missing barrel either, but maybe it's happened. Personally, I like the safety.

Plastic ejector prone to breakage.

I would agree this might be a legitimate issue after years of service

Gritty action.

Mine is as smooth as my SS...maybe you handled a dirty one..??

Spray on finish.

The finish is not on par with a SS, agreed.

Mediocre accuracy.

Unless there are some objective numbers to reference, I would question any claim that the RR's inherent accuracy is less than the Ruger SS. Some folk may be more accurate with one or the other.

Bottom of the barrel but at least it's cheap. If you can't afford a $250-$300 used Single Six, you sure as hell can't afford to throw away $150 on a Heritage. Save your pennies, buy something good, thank me later.

Some folks don't want to pay 2x for a better finish, and an unnecessary, all steel frame. Yes, the Ruger is a better built gun, no question. Is it worth 2x...I guess that depends on the buyer and his/her intended use.

I have both. I bought the RR specifically as a plinker/trail/truck/fishing gun and it serves that purpose well.

CraigC
January 28, 2013, 12:46 PM
It's a 22, the frame isn't gonna break...well, I've never seen one break
Frames don't have to break. Do a search on THR and TFL to find a thread about a pot metal Cimarron Plinkerton to see what happens.


I've never seen or heard of a loose or missing barrel either, but maybe it's happened. Personally, I like the safety.
If you're okay with a glued-in barrel, that's fine. Some folks like to actually zero their fixed sight guns and that means turning the barrel. Can't do that with a Heritage.


I would agree this might be a legitimate issue after years of service
Doesn't take years.


Mine is as smooth as my SS...maybe you handled a dirty one..??
Uh, or several brand new ones over the years.


Unless there are some objective numbers to reference, I would question any claim that the RR's inherent accuracy is less than the Ruger SS. Some folk may be more accurate with one or the other.
Only 25yrs of reading everything I can on single actions, online and in print. I have yet to see a user post a bench rest report on a Heritage. Have only seen them in print and by online reviewers. Results not very good. While any good Single Six should shoot at least 1.5"@25yds. Have you bench tested yours, or are your feelings just hurt because I told the truth about your shooter? A Ruger won't shoot as well as a S&W or Colt on average, are my feelings hurt over that? Uh, no.


Some folks don't want to pay 2x for a better finish, and an unnecessary, all steel frame.
Obviously. It is up to the user, as is whether or not a steel frame is unnecessary. How many 50-60yr old Rough Riders you see around???

22-rimfire
January 28, 2013, 01:55 PM
How many 50-60yr old Rough Riders you see around???

Low blow! :D

I'm 100% with you for the most part with the zinc framed Rough Riders (RR). I just think you're better off in the long run to just get the Ruger and be done with it. But I have said that it is better to buy a RR and shoot than postpone a purchase for a many months or years to get the Ruger.

returningfire
January 28, 2013, 02:16 PM
Get a used SS for less than $300, yes they are out there. It will be worth as much or more after five years of use, but what would a five year old used RR be worth?

Jlr2267
January 28, 2013, 02:52 PM
Do a search on THR and TFL to find a thread about a pot metal Cimarron Plinkerton to see what happens.

I thought we were discussing the HRR

If you're okay with a glued-in barrel, that's fine. Some folks like to actually zero their fixed sight guns and that means turning the barrel. Can't do that with a Heritage.

Some folks don't need or want to...why would they pay extra for it?

Doesn't take years.

Mine's lasted years...have you experience with broken ones in less than a year?

Uh, or several brand new ones over the years.

Ok, I'll take your word for it, although it contradicts my own experience

Have you bench tested yours, or are your feelings just hurt because I told the truth about your shooter? A Ruger won't shoot as well as a S&W or Colt on average, are my feelings hurt over that? Uh, no.

I've not, neither my SS. Maybe you should share your data if you have divined the "truth" somehow. Should be an interesting read.

Obviously. It is up to the user, as is whether or not a steel frame is unnecessary. How many 50-60yr old Rough Riders you see around???

How many single sixes you see for < $100

mcdonl
January 28, 2013, 02:58 PM
Depends on your use... I keep mine in one of three places (The gun cabinet), a bucket with lures and baits or a tackle box...

It always works and is accurate enough for what I need, but I do not worry about beating the crap out of it...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/mcdonl/2011%20Trapping%20Season/0564f5fc.jpg

tpelle
January 28, 2013, 03:21 PM
I've looked at them in the past, and tried REALLY HARD to make myself like them, but I just couldn't! There's just something about the finish of the frame that screams "CapGun" to me.

Granted, however, that if you look at the way the one piece grip fram attaches to the main frame, they really look like a knock-off of that old Colt .22 (Can't remember what it was called...."New Frontier" or something like that?).

I wanted a .22 single-action revolver, but didn't like the Ruger due to their non-authentic loading sequence. (Yes, it's safe. I know that. But I wanted something with a little more authentic feel to it.) I also did not want any oddball safety levers, etc. I ended up buying an EAA Bounty Hunter. Here's a report I did on it, with pics, from back when I bought it:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=600240

CraigC
January 28, 2013, 03:24 PM
I thought we were discussing the HRR
If you don't think any other pot metal firearm is relevant, then stick your head back in the sand.


Some folks don't need or want to...why would they pay extra for it?
If some folks have no "need" or "want" to hit what they're aiming at, then I guess the Heritage is for them.


Mine's lasted years...have you experience with broken ones in less than a year?
How much do you shoot it? I've never heard of anyone pu tting more than 4-5000rds through one. Most the folks who jump to defend them really don't have a clue how durable they are because they don't do enough shooting to find out. Seen enough reports about broken ones....


Ok, I'll take your word for it, although it contradicts my own experience
Handle many single actions??? I reckon if you don't know what one is supposed to feel like.....


I've not, neither my SS.
So how can you argue with me about it???


Maybe you should share your data if you have divined the "truth" somehow.
I believe I have.


How many single sixes you see for < $100
Very few. They cost more because they're worth more.

Jlr2267
January 28, 2013, 04:25 PM
If you don't think any other pot metal firearm is relevant, then stick your head back in the sand.

Its entirely irrelevant. Some steel guns break too...is that an argument for pot metal?

if some folks have no "need" or "want" to hit what they're aiming at, then I guess the Heritage is for them.

Every gun does not need the barrel turned. Maybe you have been extremely unlucky.

How much do you shoot it? I've never heard of anyone pu tting more than 4-5000rds through one. Most the folks who jump to defend them really don't have a clue how durable they are because they don't do enough shooting to find out. Seen enough reports about broken ones....

Maybe a brick/month

El Mariachi
January 28, 2013, 05:33 PM
I still love mine----even two years and a thousand+ rounds later. Best $165.00 I ever spent on a hand gun.....:D


http://i774.photobucket.com/albums/yy21/shiftster/Guns/1306104387.jpg

xxjumbojimboxx
January 29, 2013, 01:55 AM
Get a used SS for less than $300, yes they are out there. It will be worth as much or more after five years of use, but what would a five year old used RR be worth?
who cares? it was 150 to start with, sometimes lower then 100 bucks on the used market. 100 bucks for good fun shooting is worth it in my opinion, esspecially when im known to blow twice that in a day when i take my ak out.

xxjumbojimboxx
January 29, 2013, 02:03 AM
There are folks out there who simply cant find joy in something if its not better than at least the majority of whats out there... Either way, It's the same reason poeple knock the hi point 995. Its probably becasue they've never had one, or they shelled out 800 bucks for their beretta storm and would feel stupid admitting that a 995 gets the job done... when it certainly does.
Ive put 1 5000 round brick + of .22lr and something like 500 rds of .22 mag through my HRR, Theres no issues, The wheel hasnt flown out of the gun and stuck a fellow shooter in the head. The ejector is fine (mind you im careful to line up the cyclinder before pushing the ejector in, that may be why they are prone to breaking....misalignment that is) Either way she gets the job done. And i didn't have to pay 450 for something brand new. In fact, I personally think that same 450 would be better spent on 3 HRR's... Least that way my buddies could shoot too without making me sacrifice any of my time.

CajunBass
January 29, 2013, 06:08 AM
Granted, however, that if you look at the way the one piece grip fram attaches to the main frame, they really look like a knock-off of that old Colt .22 (Can't remember what it was called...."New Frontier" or something like that?).

You're talking about the old "Frontier Scout" 22's that Colt made. (The "New Frontier 22 had a steel frame and adjustable sights.) I'm glad someone else thinks so. I had a Scout a few years ago, that was in near NIB condition (with the box). The very first thing I thought when I saw the gun was that it looked just like a Rough Rider. The "finish" on the Colt frame (paint) was a bit nicer and the ejector rod was metal, but that's about it. I bought it to get the box, and figured the gun was free. It went on down the road when I got tired of having a bunch of guns that I never shot.

I went looking for a Rough Rider yesterday but my LGS didn't have any in stock. They didn't have much of anything in stock to tell you the truth. I'll keep looking.

MrAcheson
January 29, 2013, 11:48 AM
Its entirely irrelevant. Some steel guns break too...is that an argument for pot metal?Steel has infinite fatigue life. ZAMAK does not. So the frame will eventually crack and fail. Also ZAMAK has a low enough melting point that it could creep at room temperature.

More importantly steel is hard. ZAMAK is not. This why after only a few hundred rounds of .22 lr, my rough rider has started to develop cylinder shake. It's because the sharp steel ratchets at the rear of the cylinder are literally carving away the ZAMAK frame under that fierce .22lr recoil. This is probably not dangerous, but certainly won't help accuracy any. And my gun does not so much group as pattern.

I own a heritage rough rider and I really suggest people spend more money to buy something else. It's not as bad as the Cimarron Plinkerton, but it's really not good.

RaceM
January 29, 2013, 11:58 AM
@ JumboJimbo et al: If you make a small bushing to go in the ejector's frame hole to keep things aligned ejection works much better. Just back the cylinder up against the hand and pop out the empties. While I was at it I replaced the cheap plastic on the ejector rod with brass.

Hammerdown77
January 29, 2013, 02:45 PM
I'll have to bench rest my Rough Rider against my old model Single Six. Last time out, I did shoot both of them off the bench to check sights (I had just gotten the Single Six), and as I recall, the Rough Rider shot smaller groups, although I didn't keep the targets to confirm that. My RR has the adjustable sights with the fiber optic front. I'd HIGHLY recommend spending a little more for the adjustable sight model.

The SS is definitely a nicer gun to work the action on, but the trigger pull on my RR is very very good, considering the spongy hammer action. The trigger could greatly benefit from some kind of overtravel stop. It feels like it travels half an inch after it breaks. The cylinder is difficult to rotate quickly when loading/unloading, but I think that's because the hand spring is really really strong and needs to be tweaked. When I first got the RR, I was surprised at how well it felt in the hand. The grip shape and size is very nice, and it points and balances just as nicely as the SS.

The old model SS is certainly the nicer gun, but you don't find these around my parts for under $300 very often (certainly not at any store or gunshow), if you find them at all. The new Single Six just doesn't do anything for me, especially for what they cost new.

BCCL
January 29, 2013, 04:59 PM
As cheap as they are, I recommend folks that want to know if they are OK or not, buy one and find out first hand. A LOT of internet talk about Heritage Arms, comes from people that have never owned one. I've heard a lot of the same chatter about their Big Bore line, being "junk", but mine has fired a lot of rounds without a problem, and is one of the more accurate fixed sight SA's I have.

On a good sale, the .22's can be had for anywhere from $99 to $130, and if you don't like one after actually shooting one, instead of relying of online "experts", then you can get most of that back and have some first hand experience to form an opinion on.

Jlr2267
January 29, 2013, 05:16 PM
Steel has infinite fatigue life. ZAMAK does not. So the frame will eventually crack and fail. Also ZAMAK has a low enough melting point that it could creep at room

Fatigue life is not infinite, for ANY material. Yes, for a given cyclic loading, plain carbon steel will have a longer fatigue life than ZAMAK, but that really does not matter if both guns are designed to withstand, say, 1 million shots.

Creep is, for engineering purposes, essentially zero for ALL common metals at room temperature. Creep requires *sustained* loading, at a stress that represents a significant fraction of the yield stress, and at elevated temperature (none of this applies to a handgun).

Apple a Day
January 29, 2013, 08:29 PM
I bought one when they were $130 brand new years ago. I have no idea how many thousands of rounds I've put through it but it was my every-time plinker for a good while. I finally wore the seer notch off the hammer. I ordered a new one, put it in place, and still shoot it from time to time. Once in a while I had to tighten the screws until I put some Loc Tite on them.
For a cheap plinker I've more than gotten my money's worth out of it. It's been several new shooters' first gun (with shorts or CBs). A couple of years ago I bought a Ruger Bearcat which now fills that role. The Bearcat is a better gun but costs quite a bit more.
I bought it as a cheap plinker and like I said I've gotten my money's worth.

DNS
January 29, 2013, 11:31 PM
We have a member on here that had one slightly out of warranty and it blew the frame apart.
I believe the casting was at issue. Obviously that wouldn't have happened with all steel.

Waiting and wondering if he'll post pictures.....

As an actual RR owner I'd agree more with CraigC and get a Ruger first. My Heritage is a canoe gun. My Ruger will someday get passed on to the kids.

bannockburn
January 30, 2013, 09:24 AM
I would say when it comes to the Rough Rider revolver, I'm more with the "glass is half empty" consenus. I have looked at them from time to time (had a friend that owned one, briefly), and I guess I just don't see their overall value. Believe me I'm not any kind of gun snob or dedicated collector but when I buy a gun I'm looking for quality, reliability, and durability; in other words something that's going to work right and keep on doing it that way for a very long time. I prefer to go with brand name manufacturers who I know turn out a decent product and I'm fine with paying the price for that product if it's reasonable and affordable to me.

So if a Rough Rider revolver works for you at that price point and for it's intended purpose, then by all means buy it, use it, and enjoy it. It's just that for me personally, it's not the direction I would go in if I was looking for a single action .22.

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