Classic American Rimfires?


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KodeFore
January 27, 2013, 04:35 PM
I would like to know what folks here consider the classic american made rimfires?

"Classic" for me means something that has been around a long time or maybe has had a major Impact on the shooting scene, something that still appeals to many shooters today.

I am going start things off with the Marlin 39, Remington 572, and Marlin 60. These are guns I own & love shooting. I have never had a ruger 10/22 but I think that should be on the list. ( If I can ever find a a takedown model I might jump on that bandwagon)

So what do you think?

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rcmodel
January 27, 2013, 05:22 PM
If the Browning SA22 isn't on the list, it darn well should be.

It has been in continous production longer then any other .22 rifle made.

I'd have to throw in the Winchester 9422 also.
It was as good as it gets when they were still being made.

And the gool old Winchester 1890/06/62A pumps.

They sold a boatload of them over the years too.

rc

TexasPatriot.308
January 27, 2013, 06:04 PM
by that definition, mine aint a classic but I have had a Sears & Roebuck (made by Marlin) single shot for over 50 years, I can still shoot a snake in the head (cottonmouths in the water) with the iron sights at up to 50 yards, no problem...the rifle is beat up and I still love it.

content
January 27, 2013, 06:15 PM
Hello friends and neighbors // The Marlin 1897 ,used by Annie Oakley,or the later 39 (as stated)would be high on the list.

From personal use, starting in Boy Scouts, my choice is the Winchester 69 or 69A bolt action.

loose noose
January 27, 2013, 06:19 PM
Stevens Favorite, I've got one and truly love it, it belonged to my grandpa, as well as my dad, and still shoots accurate.:D

natman
January 27, 2013, 06:41 PM
Winchester 52
Marlin 39
Winchester 69a (first gun I ever fired)

stan rose
January 27, 2013, 07:06 PM
I not as long on the earth as some of the other members, but my "classic" .22lr accumulation consist of Winchester 62, 69a, 9422, and a Remington single shot Target Master that my grand father got for Christmas in the late 1920s. All are a lot of fun to shoot.
And I forgot about an old "salt wood" Browning T-bolt I got from my uncle. They may not be as prevalent as some other models, but I think it's a classic.

Boattale
January 27, 2013, 07:39 PM
The Remington 51_ series of bolt rifles is in there. I think 77/22 is as well.

Furncliff
January 27, 2013, 07:52 PM
Marlin 39...in production for 100+ years. The best selling lever rimfire in the world.

Marlin 60... more than 11,000,000 sold.

WoodchuckAssassin
January 27, 2013, 07:58 PM
My dad's Remington Scoremaster .22 is still the gold standard for me. He's had it for 50 years, is STILL the only .22 he owns, and drives tacks all day long.

My Ruger 10/22 shoots very nice nickel size groups at 50 yards, but the old Scoremaster will never be touched in terms of quality, and down-right good looks!

soonerfan85
January 27, 2013, 08:17 PM
add

Remington Model 12 Gallery Special slide action, for those of us that are old enough to remember when shooting galleries used real .22 rifles.

The Winchester slide actions rifles with external hammer.

The Ruger Mark series pistols.

Rembrandt
January 27, 2013, 08:20 PM
Winchester 52's......about as American Classic as John Wayne.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/52/52collection.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/52/52receiver.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/52/52peeps1.jpg

Nasty
January 28, 2013, 01:08 PM
The Remington "Nylon"...the very first of plastic firearms. Millions still in use today...this is mine dating back to a birthday in 1967.

http://i1198.photobucket.com/albums/aa458/raynewton/66rightsidelarge-1-1_zps25082bb3.jpg

Jackal
January 28, 2013, 01:16 PM
Any Remington 500 series and Mossberg 40 series.

ironworkerwill
January 28, 2013, 02:36 PM
Savage 99 gets my vote

tuj
January 28, 2013, 07:42 PM
Remington 40X and Kimber 82G.

ColtPythonElite
January 28, 2013, 07:46 PM
Remington Model 37 and 40x.

DrawDn
January 28, 2013, 09:05 PM
Winchester's 52, 69, & 9422.
Remingtons 511, 541, & 581.
Browning T-Bolt & SA22.
Marlin 39.
Ruger 10/22, 77/22.
Springfield 1922.

Abel
January 28, 2013, 09:34 PM
The Winchester 190 & 290

...and the 255 too!

Joe I
January 28, 2013, 10:52 PM
I guess it depends on what facet of the shooting sports you're into.

For me, the Remington 37 and 40X, and the Winchester 52 represent the high point of American target rifles.

The 10/22 is probably the most-accessorized .22 out there. Frankly I don't care for them in out-of-the-box condition, but you can certainly make something out of them with aftermarket parts.

If I had to pick an overall favorite, it would be the Marlin 39. Well-balanced, good accuracy, classic looks, beautiful wood-to-metal fit, perfectly weighted for an all-day carry.

Deltaboy
January 28, 2013, 11:00 PM
Any Remington 500 series and Mossberg 40 series.
This I love my 512 .

ColtPythonElite
January 28, 2013, 11:16 PM
I guess it depends on what facet of the shooting sports you're into.

For me, the Remington 37 and 40X, and the Winchester 52 represent the high point of American target rifles.

The 10/22 is probably the most-accessorized .22 out there. Frankly I don't care for them in out-of-the-box condition, but you can certainly make something out of them with aftermarket parts.

If I had to pick an overall favorite, it would be the Marlin 39. Well-balanced, good accuracy, classic looks, beautiful wood-to-metal fit, perfectly weighted for an all-day carry.
The 37, 40x, and 52 are the high point of American target rifles. They cost a lot now, but also cost a lot when new. They were and still are worth it.

Cocked & Locked
January 28, 2013, 11:25 PM
Marlin 39/39A

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/17383006/270024917.jpg

SwampWolf
January 28, 2013, 11:28 PM
Winchester Model 77 and, of course, my first gun-the Winchester Model 67.

forindooruseonly
January 29, 2013, 12:32 AM
My personal favorites are the Winchester 52 and the Winchester 63.

TooManyToys
January 29, 2013, 04:28 AM
Winchester 1890, 1906 pumps, 69, 52 Bolt actions.
Marlin 39 lever.
Remington, 121 pump, 510, 511, 512. Bolt actions.
Ruger 10/22
ALL pre 70's Mossberg Bolt actions.

Boxhead
January 30, 2013, 10:38 PM
My 1933 vintage Rem M34P.

http://i1197.photobucket.com/albums/aa437/boxhead61/Guns2011047.jpg

ThirtyOughtSix
January 30, 2013, 11:31 PM
Henry Lever Action

Cocked & Locked
January 30, 2013, 11:46 PM
My 1933 vintage Rem M34P.

http://i1197.photobucket.com/albums/aa437/boxhead61/Guns2011047.jpg

That Remington is nice! :what:

Chair ain't bad either. :cool:

huntsman
January 31, 2013, 12:13 AM
Win 63

d2wing
January 31, 2013, 08:13 PM
Winchester 74, Mossberg 44

Cee Zee
February 2, 2013, 10:49 AM
The Remington 40X is the king of the US rimfires by a good margin. Nothing has had as much impact on accuracy as the 40X. They built them right and they are still highly sought after and the price is getting higher for examples still in operation. Bench rest shooters rely on them heavily. But they are great squirrel rifles in their original form. They are just incredibly good rifles.

Other rifles are also good but not on the same level IMO. The Winchester 52 among others is a great rifle. Then of course other .22's have made their mark on the world like the Marlin 39.

If you want to talk ubiquitous rifles though the top of the list reads "Marlin 60". It's the top selling rimfire of all time for good reason. It's a great rifle that comes at a great price and does the job right out of the box which is exactly what a lot of people want. The 10/22 is second on that list. With half the sales of the 60 it isn't the "everyman's rifle" that the Marlin is but it certainly is a popular rifle. It can be built into an incredibly good level but it comes out of the box pretty good. It just isn't as good or as cheap as the Marlin as a stock rifle. But if I had my choice between a total bling Ruger and a bone stock Marlin the choice would be simple. The Ruger would be a much better rifle. But personally, if I want accuracy I get a bolt action. It's much cheaper that way. A fully modified Ruger is not a cheap rifle. In fact it's a very expensive rifle and it will never be equal to the top bolt action rifles.

A lot of other rifles are great American rifles too IMO. Savage has created a great rifle in the MkII especially the heavy barrel models. T/C was a great, great rifle. The Remington 597 and several other Remingtons and a long list of Winchesters and a long list of Stevens and Savage rifles have all been classics IMO. Then there's the custom built rifles. Maybe I should have started this list with a Bill Calfee built rifle. That would be the best rifle you could possibly get as far as accuracy goes. He builds rifles from parts of course but no one does it as well as he does. I almost had my mitts on one a few years ago and at an incredibly great price. I should have borrowed the money to get it but I hate borrowing money. It was Christmas and I was low on cash after having bought a lot of presents. By the time I got the cash the rifle was gone. I guess that will always be the one that got away for me.

JohnBT
February 2, 2013, 12:00 PM
A vote for the Cooper 57M. The folks who said people would never buy expensive .22 rifles were proven wrong.

"The Model 57, 22LR, was added to the line-up in 1999, eventually evolving into the Model 57M in 2001"

Otoh, I didn't sell my Mountie or 541-S either. That reminds me, I need to see about getting my father's Savage 23AA from my uncle.

Accurate, too. My 57M Custom Classic .22 LR.

http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj80/JohnBT3/12153coopercustomclassic57M.jpg

Deltaboy
February 2, 2013, 12:11 PM
Don't forget the Marlin 60.

SwampWolf
February 2, 2013, 05:22 PM
The Remington 40X is the king of the US rimfires by a good margin. Nothing has had as much impact on accuracy as the 40X.

I would argue that the Winchester Model 52 has just as much "stature", if not, more.

Rembrandt
February 2, 2013, 06:18 PM
Agree with SwampWolf, the 52's were the benchmark for nearly 75 years. They held countless Olympic and world records during that time. While the 40X is certainly tops, it doesn't have the pedigree of the 52.

SlamFire1
February 2, 2013, 07:46 PM
For a generation long dead, their rimfire would be the Stevens Crackshot rimfires. Stevens made a number of variations of single shot rifles, all built around a rolling block type action.

This is the STEVENS "JUNIOR" NO. 11 rifle in .22rf. The first advertisement for it appeared in the Feb. 1924, Hunter, Trader, Trapper magazine for $4.50. Production ceased in 1932. Pretty nice old piece considering that it's AT LEAST 79 years old!

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?p=711094


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/A_zpse68a0608.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/B_zps25659252.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/C_zps1a6cb83b.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/D_zps0ffcf19e.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/E_zps5596bb08.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/F_zpsbe079907.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/G_zps22cd202c.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/SlamFire/Rifles%20various/Stevens%20Crackshot/H_zps3f209c02.jpg

hueyville
February 2, 2013, 08:54 PM
The classic American 22 is which ever one your father gave you growing up. If it came to him from his father add 5 points in scoring value. If it came to your grandfather through his father add another 12 points. If it goes back in the family farther than that then it is a beyond points scoring rifle. In my vault is the 22 rifle that passed down through the family an unknown number of generations. I am on the registry of the sons of the American Revolution and a Son of the Confederacy. My family still lives on the 160 acre farm that was a land grant from the King of England. As such, we may be some of the few people in this country living on their own property. Check out this link. You might find this some of the more interesting reading in years. Thus glad we hung on to the deeds going back to pre revolutionary war as to ownership of our property. Bottom line, we may well still be a colony of England. Government schools never seem to present some facts of importance.

http://www.civil-liberties.com/books/colony2.html

My 22 rifle dates back so far we cannot put a date or even a generation on it. There is no makers name on it, no dates, no hallmarks, serial number, etc. It is a turn bolt .22lr and not even stamped with that information. It is not slick, pristine, or even well taken care of. It has never been abused but it has been highly used. If required, I could feed my family with it as it did a couple of generations in the past. In 30+ years of being a firearm affectionado I have yet to show it to an expert that could definitively identify it. Thus I am not sure if it is even American made but it is most definitely an American Classic.

ApacheCoTodd
February 3, 2013, 11:56 PM
...and a couple others. Everyone was out for a check-up after our recent rains so I thought I'd snap a photo.
-Remington Speedmaster 552. Semi-auto that feeeds short, long or long rifle in the semi auto mode. Decent sights and scope ring rails.
-Marlin 60. For me THE American semi-auto .22.
-Stevens 66B. Outstanding sights in peep/match and open form with alternative front profiles like any good match gun. Full size feel. Tough to scope without drilling.:mad:
-Marlin 39: Hex and round barreled "Golden 39". Micro groove. Smooth action. Full size feel. Easy to scope - drilled and tapped. Bolt action accuracy with boy-appeal cowboy lever.
-Winchester 75. THE BEST!
-Springfield M-2. how rockin' cool is a righteous .22 based completely upon the best bolt action battle rifle ever made?
-Mossberg Model R. I'll withhold assessment on this till after the restoration but it is pushing the right buttons so far.
-Winchester 74. Great action and feel. Tough to scope. Decent factory sights.

Cee Zee
February 4, 2013, 03:16 AM
I would argue that the Winchester Model 52 has just as much "stature", if not, more.

The 52 was a classic and had just as much stature as the 40X right up until the time the 40X came along. And some people held onto the notion that they were just as good. But the 40X quickly proved they weren't. You might notice that I didn't mention "stature". What I said was the 40X did more for accuracy than any US rifle and that's true. Yes the 52 with it's beautiful lines and hand crafted quality was a true classic. All I said was the 40X became (and remains) an even bigger classic. And that is true all day long. Remington did to Winchester what Winchester had done to other rifle makers. They made a relatively inexpensive (compared to the super expensive European rifles for example) rifle that could hold it's own with any rifle when it came to accuracy. Well Remington was cheaper and more accurate. They pretty much put the 52 out of business by doing the same things the 52 had done.

Consider the equipment list for the ARA National bench rest competition (http://archive.americanrimfire.com/2011/Outdoor/Ntl-Tourn-Equip.html). There are 116 contestants listed. Of those exactly one person uses a Winchester "54" action. 22 people use a 40X action. There's a reason for that. The 40X is still making a dent in our shooting culture while the 52's and 54's have become collector's items more than top notch shooters. Yes they were classics for a long time. But the 40X became "the" classic US rimfire and it still is.

Coal Dragger
February 4, 2013, 03:41 AM
I'll second JohnBT on the Cooper 57M. Although mine is more utilitarian with its laminated stock and matte blue finish there is nothing cheap, or chintzy about it. I am glad it is still possible to buy an American made rimfire rifle that is made to meet a atandard of excellence, and not just a price point.

I also love my old Kimber M82 Govt' for similar reasons.

Deer_Freak
February 4, 2013, 03:54 AM
I don't think that your personal favorite rimfire should be the definition of classic. A classic rimfire should be a gun that was ahead of it's time. A gun that was copied by many manufacturers because nothing in their line up should match it.

Another forum has two articles written on deer rifles and calibers that changed the game. Most of the calibers were so obscure I have never heard of most of them yet the author skipped guns/calibers that literally changed the way we hunt deer today.

Aaron1100us
February 4, 2013, 05:30 AM
Remington Nylon 66.


My 1961 in Seneca Green

179097

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk 2

351 WINCHESTER
February 4, 2013, 08:01 PM
I hardly think the Browning SA22 could quality as American even though it's designer was. I would pick the 63 Winchester, 39 Marlin, 67 Winchester, 514 Remington, Nylon 66.

wrs840
February 4, 2013, 08:12 PM
IMO, the Marlin 60 is a towering achievement in the category "classic/standard", even though it may not be gorgeous to look at.

One Winchester 9422M is probably the prettiest and most elegant rifle I own. I think it came infused with "The Force" too, because it "hits" way above my class.

ApacheCoTodd
February 4, 2013, 08:16 PM
Remington Nylon 66.


My 1961 in Seneca Green

179097

Sent from my PB99400 using Tapatalk 2
I remember as a kid how our dads would be Ford/Chevy/Chrysler or moms would be Mary Kay/Avon... whatever.
Amongst us kids, if one was into semi-autos (I didn't really like them) it came down to Nylon/60/10-22.

Even though I never had one I still get a kick outa seeing a pristine vintage Nylon.

content
February 24, 2013, 10:39 AM
Hello friends and neighbors // How about a couple of Military .22cal training rifles and a straight shooting oldster.

1915 Enfield (top) Lucky to find this ,Parker Hale, locally.

180315**middle-- is a 1939(first year) Remington 510.Non military still functions, going by the carvings and cracks it has definitely been a boys woods rifle.

1943 Remington 513T (bottom) We used these shooting in High school ROTC.
Started my niece rifle shooting, last year, with this old "jewel". She appreciated the Military history almost as much as I do.

content
February 24, 2013, 10:46 AM
Hello friends and neighbors // At one time single shot, takedown .22s were everywhere.

Remington #4 Rolling Block
180316

180317
Stevens #26 "Crackshot"

content
February 24, 2013, 10:57 AM
Hello friends and neighbors // The single shots were soon followed by .22 rifles of every flavor.

Remington Model 12 (1911) Pump action180318


Winchester 69 (1937), 69A (1943) Bolt Action180319 I first used these in the Boy Scouts at Camp Horseshoe, Pa.

Marlin 39A (1952) Lever action180320

Remington 552 (1955) Semi auto action180321

xfyrfiter
February 24, 2013, 11:21 AM
I have an old Marlin 81DL that I would consider a classic. Also an old Stevens single shot that my dad learned to shoot with, he was born in 1919. The old Stevens has taught all of my younger brothers, and both of my boys. Sorry, no daughters in the crew.

Sav .250
February 24, 2013, 11:23 AM
Remington,model-511. Clip.

Pacsd
February 24, 2013, 12:12 PM
I like my model 60, 10-.22, & the Nylon Remington but, I think I like the old model 783 tube fed .22Mag. best.

CB900F
February 24, 2013, 02:25 PM
Fella's;

Another vote for the Marlin 39 in first place. But, considering BRNO too, I'll also throw a vote for the CZ452.

900F

snakeman
February 24, 2013, 02:40 PM
10. springfield 03
9. m1 garand
8. winchester m70
7. remington 700
6. ruger m77
5. weatherby mk V
4. savage 99
3. marlin 336
2. winchester 94
1. winchester 1873

natman
February 24, 2013, 04:25 PM
10. springfield 03
9. m1 garand
8. winchester m70
7. remington 700
6. ruger m77
5. weatherby mk V
4. savage 99
3. marlin 336
2. winchester 94
1. winchester 1873

Classic rifles all, but none of them are RIMFIRES.

BisleyBlackhawk45
February 24, 2013, 04:34 PM
The very first .22 semi automatic....Winchester model 1903. Obsolete cartridge today but IMHO One of the prettiest little rifles ever produced....and John Moses didn't design this one.

rodinal220
February 24, 2013, 09:49 PM
Stevens Crackshot,Remington 12 series

ColtPythonElite
February 24, 2013, 10:01 PM
One of my classics:

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=179780&d=1360963611

76shuvlinoff
February 24, 2013, 10:14 PM
My 56 and 77 39As. I also have a Marlin 60. I think it is the most vastly underrated .22 semi auto.

http://i476.photobucket.com/albums/rr123/76shuvlinoff/3c7cb854-7f15-44ce-81f6-d2fbb64a257a_zps065ddd0d.jpg

Onmilo
February 24, 2013, 10:25 PM
The title alone sums it all up.
They are ALL classic!

HOWARD J
February 24, 2013, 10:33 PM
62 years ago I purchased my first rifle
Took a street car downtown & bought a Savage Model 22/410 ( later named Savage 24V )
22 over 410
It was a fun gun for a first weapon

snakeman
February 25, 2013, 12:14 AM
Oh rimfires! duh!

I'll go for 5 on this round.

5. winchester 9422 22 mag
4. marlin 39
3. marlin 983 22 magnum (my favorite magnum)
2. ruger 10/22
1. henry lever 22 standard configuration (my favorite non magnum)

Cee Zee
February 26, 2013, 11:32 PM
considering BRNO too, I'll also throw a vote for the CZ452.

I'd have to check but I'm pretty sure those aren't "American" Rimfires. ;)

mach1.3
February 27, 2013, 03:21 PM
My collection includes my classics.
Remington 550-1
Winchester 74
Marlin 39A
(3) Marlin M60s
Remington M34( I love tubular mags)
Ruger MKIII Target/Competition 5.5"
Ruger SS Hunter 6.88"
New yesterday CZ American 455 combo

I'm always looking to build on my .22 family.
If I could just find the 1600 rd. ammo can of CCI .22 Mini-mags in 40 gr. RN.

SwampWolf
February 27, 2013, 07:12 PM
Quote:
I would argue that the Winchester Model 52 has just as much "stature", if not, more.

The 52 was a classic and had just as much stature as the 40X right up until the time the 40X came along. And some people held onto the notion that they were just as good. But the 40X quickly proved they weren't. You might notice that I didn't mention "stature". What I said was the 40X did more for accuracy than any US rifle and that's true. Yes the 52 with it's beautiful lines and hand crafted quality was a true classic. All I said was the 40X became (and remains) an even bigger classic. And that is true all day long. Remington did to Winchester what Winchester had done to other rifle makers. They made a relatively inexpensive (compared to the super expensive European rifles for example) rifle that could hold it's own with any rifle when it came to accuracy. Well Remington was cheaper and more accurate. They pretty much put the 52 out of business by doing the same things the 52 had done.

Consider the equipment list for the ARA National bench rest competition. There are 116 contestants listed. Of those exactly one person uses a Winchester "54" action. 22 people use a 40X action. There's a reason for that. The 40X is still making a dent in our shooting culture while the 52's and 54's have become collector's items more than top notch shooters. Yes they were classics for a long time. But the 40X became "the" classic US rimfire and it still is.

The op did not ask which rifle was/is the most accurate. He asked:

I would like to know what folks here consider the classic american made rimfires?

"Classic" for me means something that has been around a long time or maybe has had a major Impact on the shooting scene, something that still appeals to many shooters today.

It's a matter of opinion, of course, and my opinion remains that the Winchester Model 52 has been, is and will always continue to be seen by most classic .22 rimfire rifle aficionados to be more of a "classic" than a Remington Model 40x wannabe will ever be. And that, my friend, constitutes "stature" in the world of classics.
It is conceded that the word "classic" doesn't necessarily always translate into being the best; it only means that most serious collectors/shooters view it as being something more than a rifle just making a well-deserved record on the range; it's something more, something special in terms of looks, handling, workmanship, accuracy, reputation, accuracy, durability and reliability. Not many firearms ever reach the level of being a true American classic. The Winchester Model 52 is one of the few and I would argue that the 40x just doesn't measure up, no matter how well it shoots.

Cee Zee
March 1, 2013, 10:40 AM
The op did not ask which rifle was/is the most accurate. He asked:


I stated what I think and I'm sticking by it. You can think a rifle that was proven to be inferior to another rifle is more of a "classic" all you want. I don't think that way. You can argue whatever you like. Just not with me. It takes 2 to argue and I'm not playing. The 40X is clearly the greatest American rimfire of all time. IMO that makes it "the" classic US rimfire rifle. Bye.

twice barrel
March 1, 2013, 03:00 PM
Sears Model 25
High Standard Sport King

.22-5-40
March 1, 2013, 06:51 PM
post #55 implied that the Winchester 1873 was not a rimfire..The winchester 73' was that companies first rifle chambered in .22 short and long..( the long-rifle didn't make it's debut until 1887). and I believe the first repeating American .22 rifle.
Other classics are Ballard No. 3, Colt Lightning, Remington rolling blocks, and the various Stevens from full-blown off-hand schuetzen match rifles to plain hunting guns.

content
March 1, 2013, 07:07 PM
Hello friends and neighbors // The .41rf, Swiss Vetterli would be a Classic Military Rifle.
180632

In use by the Swiss from 1869 thru 1890 the 12 shot(11 +1), bolt action, rimfire is still available in America but often converted these days to shoot centerfire.

Several videos are posted at youtube.

Cee Zee
March 1, 2013, 08:12 PM
There were also lots of stalking rifles in rimfire cartridges .22-5-40. But I still tend to think of those and the Schuetzen rifles as mostly German or Austrian rifles by design. I know lots of US companies made them but the designs and the competitions were strictly Prussian. I'm storing a stalking rifle for a friend right now while he spends the winter in Florida. He wanted it locked in my safe along with a few other classics. It's a .22 Hornet though so no rimfire cartridge and it's not American either. It is a fantastic shooter though. And it will be up for sale as soon as my friend, who has a machine shop, makes some scope mounts for it.

And some of you guys are still missing the "rimfire" and "American" parts of the OP's question. A Swiss centerfire really doesn't qualify does it?

There have certainly been lots of classic American rimfire rifles. And they keep making new ones too.

content
March 1, 2013, 09:42 PM
I think you missed both the fact that the Swiss is a .41 RIMFIRE used as an AMERICAN sporter since the 1890s, like mine, just not American made.

Cee Zee
March 2, 2013, 07:44 PM
You were talking about it being converted to a centerfire. That's why I said that. But I still wouldn't think it was an American classic because it isn't American.

Ibgreen
March 9, 2013, 09:06 PM
Winchester 1906
Winchester 62A
Marlin model 60
1868 spencer 56-50 rim fire repeating rifle

MCgunner
March 9, 2013, 09:33 PM
If the Browning SA22 isn't on the list, it darn well should be.

Belgian rifle? Japanese rifle? Was it ever made in the USA? I love the gun, just sayin'.

Smith357
March 10, 2013, 12:53 AM
Winchester, 52, 75, 62, 63, 9422, et et
Stevens 44 1/2
Remington #4 Rolling Block, 37, 513, 541, 40X et et
Marlin 60, 39a,
Ruger 10/22
Mossberg 44
Kimber 82

788Ham
March 10, 2013, 01:52 AM
My old Remington model # 33 single shot. Salvaged this old barn gun, nice plum patina on it, stock was in a very dried condition. Not brand new, but stock refinished with Tru Oil, shoots dang fine now, not kept in the barn anymore!

CaliCoastie
March 10, 2013, 11:47 AM
Marlin 39(A is the most current variant, but take your pick, you won't go wrong. Plus a bit older production than the Browning) semis? Marlin 60, ruger 10/22. Heard great things on Remington 580s, old savage 24c (over under, multiple calibers.... Dammit now i need a new gun) ha, bunch of stuff to choose from.

Picher
March 10, 2013, 01:30 PM
A few "classics" I've owned:

Win 37, 52C, 69A, 310

Rem 33, 512, 514, 572, 521, 581, 40X, 504*

Marlin 39A Mountie, 39A

Savage/Stevens 24 (.22/20ga), 87A (first rifle I ever bought)

Mossberg 144 Target, 152 Semi

H&R 12 Target

*Newer "classic", plagued by poor QC, but mine's great and my favorite offhand rifle. It's out of production, so it's included.

JP

DAdams
October 17, 2013, 08:26 PM
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps309a963d.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps309a963d.jpg.html)
Here are four.

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps614cfc3d.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps614cfc3d.jpg.html)

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zpsc103710f.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zpsc103710f.jpg.html)

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps05d15db5.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps05d15db5.jpg.html)

Remington Matchmaster 513-T Lyman sights. Built 1940-68. I think this is a 1941.

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps456c6bff.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps456c6bff.jpg.html)

Marlin 39A
1954

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps5b22f149.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps5b22f149.jpg.html)

http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps6d81ad56.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps6d81ad56.jpg.html)

Remington Model 24 22short Semiauto. Lyman sights. Breaks down with no tools in seconds. 1922-35.
Tube comes out of stock.

Stevens Little Scout Model 14 1/2. Single shot LR, rolling breech lock. 1909-1936.


This semiauto with easy break down is really a cool John Browning design. About 75 years old.


Lyman sight on The Matchmaker. Calibrated to 200 yards. Very heavy target rifle in VG condition.

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