Gun and ammo shortage, a glimpse


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nathan
January 27, 2013, 05:49 PM
of what it will become if some catastrophic event does happen. Guns and ammo , food , water, fuel and, what not, are gonna be in short supply when SHTF happens. It will only get worse day after day until this Feinstein Bill in Congress is put to naught. What a mess this has brought to all gunowners in general , but good profits for gun and ammo dealers. Lesson to all , get what you can buy in better times and dont get caught in the frenzy.

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GlowinPontiac
January 27, 2013, 05:54 PM
It won't stop with Feinsteins bills death. Plenty of states have their own new bills that need to be shut down.

It won't stop until every state has no more pending gun/ammo legislation.

Sent from my C5120 using Tapatalk 2

Jorg Nysgerrig
January 27, 2013, 06:33 PM
It won't stop until every state has no more pending gun/ammo legislation.

If that was the case, we wouldn't have had any guns or ammo available in the last 15 years because there's always been legislation pending in some state.

GlowinPontiac
January 27, 2013, 06:55 PM
If that was the case, we wouldn't have had any guns or ammo available in the last 15 years because there's always been legislation pending in some state.

True but right now we have many states pushing huge amounts of anti gun legislation.
CT has something around 91 gun related bills pending with over 20 introduced just last week.
Having a bill or two across the country won't cause a panic but after what happened in NY people are worried that their state is next.
Sent from my C5120 using Tapatalk 2

Lex Luthier
January 27, 2013, 06:59 PM
No kidding. I have been watching the circus with a wide grin.

manitouofthehatchie
January 27, 2013, 06:59 PM
NULLIFY...that is the word State legislators must learn...Many local law enforcement and Sheriffs across the country are saying they will refuse to enforce unConstitutional gun laws.

gossamer
January 27, 2013, 07:21 PM
Every ammo retailer and a friend who works for Olin I've talked to said shortages will abate around March.

beatledog7
January 27, 2013, 07:35 PM
If somebody were to tell me he knows when the shortage will end, I'd ask him a few questions:

1) What level of supply are you saying actually constitutes a shortage, and over what range of cartridges?

2) What are the sources of your information?

3) What other economic trends have you correctly predicted of late?

4) Given your sagacity and clairvoyance, why aren't you wealthy?

psyopspec
January 27, 2013, 07:51 PM
It will only get worse day after day until this Feinstein Bill in Congress is put to naught.

I've been using the price of a NIB Colt 6920 as a gauge, checking gunbroker every few days to see what they're going for. They have been up to the $3k range, but there's one ending in 4 minutes that's at $2425. By my unscientific, informal survey, it is getting better. Same with watching PMAGs on GB; going for $40 instead of $60. It's certainly not back to normal, but 300% over retail is less than 400% over retail, and is an indicator that things abating, at least for now.

Lesson to all, get what you can buy in better times and dont get caught in the frenzy.

Yep. Noah built the ark before the flood.

JohnBiltz
January 28, 2013, 02:26 AM
My guess is it is going to abate some, but not go away. I'd say around March we will come down to where we were during the last shortage in 08. You can find it but its not going to be sitting around on shelves in great number. At least a year and probably a year and a half before things come back to normal.

goon
January 28, 2013, 02:42 AM
I think a lot of the legislation at the state and federal is nothing more than political grandstanding. Still, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't work like hell to stamp it all out and send as many anti-gun politicians home as possible.

And besides, it's good to be part of the political process. Take pride in it.

As for when prices will come down and availability will return, who knows? And I am ok with that. My countrymen have bought practically every round of ammunition, self loading firearm, and standard capacity magazine that was available in just a few weeks. Any tyrant will now have to fear a billion or so more rounds in the hands of the people. Criminals will now need to worry about several AR-15 equipped homeowners on every block. For that, I will put up with a little inconvenience for a few months.

BHP FAN
January 28, 2013, 02:55 AM
''Criminals will now need to worry about several AR-15 equipped homeowners on every block. For that, I will put up with a little inconvenience for a few months..''

Let's see the anti's explain the sudden drop in crime, LOL!

slamfirev10
January 28, 2013, 03:37 AM
i hope you guys are right about the impending drop in crime

tarosean
January 28, 2013, 04:52 AM
Criminals will now need to worry about several AR-15 equipped homeowners on every block. For that, I will put up with a little inconvenience for a few months.


Until they are in the hands of criminals, since a ton of panic stricken people blew their wad on inflated prices and cannot afford appropriate means to securely them.

goon
January 28, 2013, 10:58 PM
Tarosean - I'd have gladly kept things as they are, with people buying firearms and magazines at their leisure.
But our politicians didn't like that.
You tell Americans they can't do something... first they tell you where to stick it, then they go do exactly what you told them not to do.
Hence, shortages.

golfer_ray
January 28, 2013, 11:08 PM
I have heard the March abatement also but determined tonight that I'm a (minor) part of the problem. I normally have about 400 rounds of 9 mm & took inventory tonight & I've got over 1,500 rounds. I realize that's "chump change' for many of you!

huntsman
January 28, 2013, 11:21 PM
of what it will become if some catastrophic event does happen. Guns and ammo , food , water, fuel and, what not, are gonna be in short supply when SHTF happens. It will only get worse day after day until this Feinstein Bill in Congress is put to naught. What a mess this has brought to all gunowners in general , but good profits for gun and ammo dealers. Lesson to all , get what you can buy in better times and dont get caught in the frenzy.
you know some of us have been prepping for this 1999 ;)

Mr Pokey
January 29, 2013, 12:18 AM
Hello from Penna,
I guess everyone is aware that the Eastern Sports and Outdoor Show in Harrisburg was cancelled because the promoter, Reed Exhibitions, decreed that no Modern Sports Rifles (evil black rifles) would be allowed to be exhibited or sold at this years show. The show is considered by many to be the largest of its kind in the country. All I know is the vendors were pulling out as fast as they could and they say on the news the show normally does 44 million in sales over the 9 days it is open. Thats a lot of gun and ammo and other stuff being bought and sold. Tonite, the news reported that the gun stores that would have been selling at the show are now trying to figure out how to unload their unsold inventory. I wonder if all those empty shelves in the gun stores are miraculously going to be full again real soon. Maybe prices will come down too.

Ignition Override
January 29, 2013, 12:28 AM
gossamer:
Maybe shortages will abate around March. Lots of people might also be turned off by the ludicrous ammo prices at gun shows. I had to leave our Germantown/Memphis show over two weeks ago to keep from laughing.

One question might be whether many peoples' tax return money will then be dumped on guns/ammo by March-May?

rdhood
January 29, 2013, 09:03 AM
''Criminals will now need to worry about several AR-15 equipped homeowners on every block. For that, I will put up with a little inconvenience for a few months..''

Except that right now, those AR-15 owners have no ammo for their guns!

MagnunJoe
January 29, 2013, 09:17 AM
I think it's going to take more than 6 months to recover. Another mass shooting anywhere in this country will complicate things even more.

PGT
January 29, 2013, 09:26 AM
Except that right now, those AR-15 owners have no ammo for their guns!
If I was a perp, I wouldn't gamble by guessing whether or not the gun was loaded or not.

Browning
January 29, 2013, 09:54 AM
Except that right now, those AR-15 owners have no ammo for their guns!
How many rounds does it take?

Most everyone I know that owns an AR has some kind of ammo stash going that they keep aside just in case.

This is just what was around my safe and handy (I'm so not digging in my closet to haul ammo out for a pic to prove a point on the interwebz).
.

http://i468.photobucket.com/albums/rr47/Browning35/Prep%20Pics/312AE87B-E95C-4FEF-9190-142C47648953-3004-000000E88A484188.jpg

And I'm weak sauce compared to some guys I know. If you even have a few mags worth you can put up a decent fight. Most civilian vs. criminal shoot outs don't last for hundreds of rounds.

4thestars
January 29, 2013, 10:19 AM
I'm thinking that calibers other than .223 will come back this spring. Even after we defeat the bans, the .223 demand will be crazy because of how many ARs have been sold.

Bubbles
January 29, 2013, 10:23 AM
Except that right now, those AR-15 owners have no ammo for their guns!
At the last 3 local gun shows there was ammo available IF you were willing to pay market rate - around $1/rd - for it.

sota
January 29, 2013, 10:36 AM
like psyopspec I too have been watching auctions and certain on-line vendors, as i think they're a pretty goo bellweather of how things are trending. right now the frenzy is still on for 9mm and .45acp from what I can tell.

PGT
January 29, 2013, 01:38 PM
From a purely business perspective, it doesn't make sense for the ammunition manufacturers to take on risk and significantly ramp up production. If there is a ban of some sort, they might take a "wait and see" approach. If there is no ban, demand might drop off to the point that they'll be losing money if they flood the market. This is econ 101.....timing of supply/demand in the market is a tough thing.

Browning
January 29, 2013, 01:48 PM
From a purely business perspective, it doesn't make sense for the ammunition manufacturers to take on risk and significantly ramp up production. If there is a ban of some sort, they might take a "wait and see" approach. If there is no ban, demand might drop off to the point that they'll be losing money if they flood the market. This is econ 101.....timing of supply/demand in the market is a tough thing.
Why? Even if this new AWB did pass ammo isn't going to be banned.

If anything ammo companies would be well advised to ramp up production as it's going for more money now because demand is high. Ever hear of the saying..'Make hay while the sun shines'?

Gun companies make profits in times like this.

akv3g4n
January 29, 2013, 01:51 PM
Ban or not, I don't see demand for ammo going down in the foreseeable future. Even in a worst case scenario where ammo purchases are limited, common calibers will be in high demand for the next few years at least. People are spooked by what has happened and what may still happen. If I was an ammo manufacturer, I would be producing at full capacity.

PGT
January 29, 2013, 01:53 PM
Why? Even if this new AWB did pass ammo isn't going to be banned.


most likely not but there could be a push back to the old way of registering ammunition purchases and such. when it comes to big operations, its not so easy to ramp up increased production for a short period of time.

I agree with the "make hay" comment but the USG orders more than the collected mass of private gun owners.

wooly bugger
January 29, 2013, 02:14 PM
From a purely business perspective, it doesn't make sense for the ammunition manufacturers to take on risk and significantly ramp up production. If there is a ban of some sort, they might take a "wait and see" approach. If there is no ban, demand might drop off to the point that they'll be losing money if they flood the market. This is econ 101.....timing of supply/demand in the market is a tough thing.
Isn't there a way to temporarily increase production without incurring any fixed expenses and in a way that they can shut down the spigot quickly?

How about offering employees 2x pay for night shifts. Don't know what this would do to margins, but my guess is, even if it leads to no additional profit, it will be good for repeat business.

Batty67
January 29, 2013, 02:24 PM
My apologies if what I post below is not in the spirit of THR, which I respect greatly, but this thought continues to pop in my head:

Just imagine what would happen if another mass shooting took place in the U.S. in the near future (meaning anytime this year, probably)?

I will continue to purchase ammunition (need some 9mm) at reasonable prices for the forseeable future (or until I have at least 2k rounds 9mm, 45acp, and 30 carbine). 10k for 22LR.

Fryerpower
January 29, 2013, 02:45 PM
I suspect that most ammo manufacturer's have been running near 100% for years. It is fairly safe to say that they do not have the ability to increase capacity without either capital investment in new equipment or ignoring periodic maintenance downtime. Capital investment only makes sense if the demand is projected to be long term, not just a short term spike. Ignoring PMs will work in the short term, but will eventually lead to problems. Ignoring PMs can work if they time it just right, keep running without a major malfunction until the peak demand passes, then shut down for much needed maintenance. It is a roll of the dice.

Jim

goon
January 30, 2013, 12:24 AM
Speaking as an employee who worked double shifts back to back to back before, I can tell you that there is only so much of that you can take. You could offer more pay, but eventually your employees are going to hit a wall and crash.
One of my friends hit a bridge in his pick-up truck proving my theory, so I know it is correct.
And I don't want exhausted employees running on caffeine fumes making ammunition that I buy.

Ignition Override
January 30, 2013, 12:29 AM
Does anybody know whether the plants in Tula Russia and Serbia (after repairs for a big kaboom) are increasing their production of any rounds exported to the US? They all realize that demand could be down a bit in a month.

Whether this is the case or not, it must require more than several weeks for it to be packaged for shipping from Russia via the Black Sea/Med. etc, from Serbia via the Med.
Isn't Wolf or Monarch repackaged after it enters the US?

nathan
January 30, 2013, 12:32 AM
Ammo shelves all empty


http://www.khou.com/news/local/gun-story-188948821.html

Trent
January 30, 2013, 08:36 AM
My apologies if what I post below is not in the spirit of THR, which I respect greatly, but this thought continues to pop in my head:

Just imagine what would happen if another mass shooting took place in the U.S. in the near future (meaning anytime this year, probably)?



No, I don't think your post is off the mark at all.

In fact, it's quite enlightening, and people should pay what you wrote their full and undivided attention.

Anti-gun agenda is clear. Mass shooting = carry signs in public with the names of the dead on them, to trample your rights in to the ground. Every time they (the anti-gunners) get a new mass graveyard to play in, a new mound on the earth to stand upon and shout their slogans, their agenda is advanced. Sounds callous and cruel? Perhaps, but it's true. And no one can possibly deny the truth in it. Because we've all witnessed it endlessly portrayed on the news for the last month and a half.

"Following Sandy Hook in which 20 children and 6 adults were ruthlessly slain by a semiautomatic Bushwhacker assault rifle..."

The phrase, or variations thereof, has appeared in EVERY print story on guns published by mainstream news media, has appeared as a talking point in EVERY press conference held by authorities, and has been said in EVERY video news broadcast, since early December.

The entire country is simultaneously p*ssed off and fearful of "what comes next", on both sides of the fence. But the favor is on the anti-gunner's side. If they fail, the next time there is a mass shooting they can stand on the pulpit before the bodies are even cold and buried, and say "SEE WE TOLD YOU SO! ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!"

Meanwhile the pro-gun side can do nothing but stockpile and say "It wasn't ME, why are you punishing ME for what some other lunatic did half a country away!"

Anti-gunners want to blame SOMEONE for what happened. The shooter is dead, robbing them of any vindication or closure. They'd throw their grandmother under the bus if it meant stemming the tide of senseless violence that is infecting society, so they can feel safe and secure sipping their latte's under the careful scrutiny of heavily armed Law Enforcement patrols. They've already made the decision to defer their personal protection on to others.

Pro-gunners want to fend for themselves, won't trade freedom for security. I'm perfectly content sipping MY latte with a 357 tucked away in my pocket, confident that I can care for my own. I don't want the heavy boot of Law Enforcement examining my every action or Officer Friendly probing my every orifice at routine traffic stops. (Source: http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/01/30/16769883-texas-set-to-terminate-trooper-following-roadside-cavity-searches?lite)

The world is not a GOOD or SAFE place, it never HAS been, and it never WILL be. No matter how many jack-boots are clomping away at the city cobblestones on patrol, there will always be rats in the gutter, feeding off of the hard work of the larger body of society.

One side turns a blind eye to the problem and says "it's someone else's problem." Let someone else clean up the mess.

The other side sees the problem, and says "I have a solution for vermin."

The two sides will never see eye to eye. So we arm ourselves, and hoard, and stockpile, and prepare. While the other side puts us deeper in debt and through their collective voices, causes the Government to stockpile, and hoard, and prepare.

The cauldron is boiling gentlemen, and we're all stewing in the same pot.

Gordon_Freeman
January 30, 2013, 09:16 AM
Trent, very well said. That is truly a well written post about what is going on.
I think the ammo manufacturers should invest to increase production for the long term. Maybe if they read Trent's comments they would!

Trent
January 30, 2013, 09:24 AM
Trent, very well said. That is truly a well written post about what is going.

I have my moments.

Truth be told, the weather is to blame. The forecast today put me in a foul mood from the get-go, and the e-mail I got from IL Gov Quinn's office this morning left me in an ill-temper. Rain/Snow/Sleet mix... with a scattering of assault weapons bans thrown in for good measure. Bleh. Nothing but bad news from Up North. (Oh, by the way, when you pay a Chicago toll ticket electronically you get automatically signed up for a Government e-mail list from the jackboots that fined you.)

The only bright side to my day is I have a brand new $30,000 64-core/512GB of RAM 2U Intel server sitting on my desk at work that I get to play with.

I can't help but look at that server and think of all the ammo and guns I could have bought. :(

Bubbles
January 30, 2013, 09:48 AM
Even if this new AWB did pass ammo isn't going to be banned.
While it may not be banned, there is a bill introduced (I don't think it will pass) that prohibits private sales; essentially a return to pre-FOPA when ammo sales were tracked. No more mail-order sales would put a dent in demand overnight, if for no other reason than buyers would have to pay more for ammo at the LGS.

NHCraigT
January 30, 2013, 10:18 AM
Very, Very well said Trent.

Batty67
January 30, 2013, 10:27 AM
Indeed. Though I'm glad I'm not the only person wondering about the consequences of the next mass shooting (alas, seems likely that there will be one, someday, somewhere), especially if it comes sooner than later...

JonnyGringo
January 30, 2013, 11:15 AM
While it may not be banned, there is a bill introduced (I don't think it will pass) that prohibits private sales; essentially a return to pre-FOPA when ammo sales were tracked. No more mail-order sales would put a dent in demand overnight, if for no other reason than buyers would have to pay more for ammo at the LGS.

It is for this reason that I put in an order with a major supplier. At the very least my order is on record predating any ban or new regulation that may be rolled out.

Trent
January 31, 2013, 07:20 AM
The only thing I got caught with my pants down on, was 5.7x28mm. I'm seeing it go for well over a buck a shot now. I refuse to pay that for a minuscule pea-shooter.

But I've got tons of brass saved up, and dies. Push comes to shove, if I ever run out of lightweight 223 projectiles to toss downrange, I'll get equipment set up to swag my own damn bullets out of 22LR range pickups. :)

http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2012/03/20/making-223-bullets-from-22-lr-brass/

Back about 10 years ago I had an old friend, who had a press that'd make 223 and 30 cal projectile jackets out of your common penny. It'd swag the jacket, you'd trim it to length, pop it in a casting mold, and pour the lead in. Then he'd crimp a gas check on the back side, clean up the nose, and sort them by weight.

Slow and tedious but it worked out fine. They ended up pretty concentric, and accurate enough.

Primer and powder supplies are the two things I can't replicate at home. Brass and bullets are just a matter of having the appropriate stage dies and raw materials to do the extrusion.

Remember people were making jacketed bullets back in the 19th century with equipment that is very primitive, compared to what you can go pick up at your local hardware shop.

vito
January 31, 2013, 07:38 AM
Around here (northern Illinois) the shortage seems to have ended, other than possibly for .223 ammo (since I don't need that caliber I haven't really paid much attention to that issue). While I cannot always find the brand or exact type of ammo that I want, I generally have been able to buy the pistol ammo for guns that I like to shoot. I even was able to buy some small pistol primers a few weeks ago, something that has been in very short supply recently. Building up huge stocks of ammo can be like a sickness; I don't really believe that we are ready to enter a post-apocalyptic world where what I have will have to last the rest of my life. I keep enough to cover me for several months of occasional visits to the range so that temporary shortages do not interfere with my desire to do some shooting. I think that if you start to fear shortages you will find that no amount of ammo will ever feel like enough. And if I dropped dead today, my wife or kids would likely sell every gun I have at bargain prices just to get rid of them, and the ammo as well. I have a small safe, about 1.5 cubic feet in size, that I keep my ammo in and when that is full (holding 500 to 700 rounds of each caliber that I need) I stop buying.

cfullgraf
January 31, 2013, 08:00 AM
Isn't there a way to temporarily increase production without incurring any fixed expenses and in a way that they can shut down the spigot quickly?

How about offering employees 2x pay for night shifts. Don't know what this would do to margins, but my guess is, even if it leads to no additional profit, it will be good for repeat business.

It depends on where the manufacturers are in their capacity capabilities.

If a company is running just one shift a day, five days a week, or two shifts a day, ten shifts a week, there is capacity available if there are people to many the machines.

Working over time is only a short term solution and folks will tire of it relatively quickly and will not want to do it any more.

Ammunition production probably requires some skills. You don't just grab some guy off the street so some training is necessary. Powder and primers are dangerous and if not handled correctly in the volumes required to make ammunition, there could be a disaster. The machines themselves will have some complexity and nuances for the new employee to learn. There will be a time before a new employee is a useful contributor.

Then, what do you do with the new guy when the shortages disappear and production needs to go back to pre-shortage levels.

Then, there is the reliability of the equipment. Reliability of the supply stream bringing it supplies.

Buying new equipment is not really an option. By the time the equipment is delivered, installed and running reliability, the shortage will be long over.

It makes for some tough decisions for management.

Warners
January 31, 2013, 08:36 AM
No, I don't think your post is off the mark at all.

In fact, it's quite enlightening, and people should pay what you wrote their full and undivided attention.

Anti-gun agenda is clear. Mass shooting = carry signs in public with the names of the dead on them, to trample your rights in to the ground. Every time they (the anti-gunners) get a new mass graveyard to play in, a new mound on the earth to stand upon and shout their slogans, their agenda is advanced. Sounds callous and cruel? Perhaps, but it's true. And no one can possibly deny the truth in it. Because we've all witnessed it endlessly portrayed on the news for the last month and a half.

"Following Sandy Hook in which 20 children and 6 adults were ruthlessly slain by a semiautomatic Bushwhacker assault rifle..."

The phrase, or variations thereof, has appeared in EVERY print story on guns published by mainstream news media, has appeared as a talking point in EVERY press conference held by authorities, and has been said in EVERY video news broadcast, since early December.

The entire country is simultaneously p*ssed off and fearful of "what comes next", on both sides of the fence. But the favor is on the anti-gunner's side. If they fail, the next time there is a mass shooting they can stand on the pulpit before the bodies are even cold and buried, and say "SEE WE TOLD YOU SO! ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!"

Meanwhile the pro-gun side can do nothing but stockpile and say "It wasn't ME, why are you punishing ME for what some other lunatic did half a country away!"

Anti-gunners want to blame SOMEONE for what happened. The shooter is dead, robbing them of any vindication or closure. They'd throw their grandmother under the bus if it meant stemming the tide of senseless violence that is infecting society, so they can feel safe and secure sipping their latte's under the careful scrutiny of heavily armed Law Enforcement patrols. They've already made the decision to defer their personal protection on to others.

Pro-gunners want to fend for themselves, won't trade freedom for security. I'm perfectly content sipping MY latte with a 357 tucked away in my pocket, confident that I can care for my own. I don't want the heavy boot of Law Enforcement examining my every action or Officer Friendly probing my every orifice at routine traffic stops. (Source: http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/01/30/16769883-texas-set-to-terminate-trooper-following-roadside-cavity-searches?lite)

The world is not a GOOD or SAFE place, it never HAS been, and it never WILL be. No matter how many jack-boots are clomping away at the city cobblestones on patrol, there will always be rats in the gutter, feeding off of the hard work of the larger body of society.

One side turns a blind eye to the problem and says "it's someone else's problem." Let someone else clean up the mess.

The other side sees the problem, and says "I have a solution for vermin."

The two sides will never see eye to eye. So we arm ourselves, and hoard, and stockpile, and prepare. While the other side puts us deeper in debt and through their collective voices, causes the Government to stockpile, and hoard, and prepare.

The cauldron is boiling gentlemen, and we're all stewing in the same pot.
Excellent, and ACCURATE post Trent. Thanks.

Warner

Browning
January 31, 2013, 10:49 AM
most likely not but there could be a push back to the old way of registering ammunition purchases and such. when it comes to big operations, its not so easy to ramp up increased production for a short period of time.

I agree with the "make hay" comment but the USG orders more than the collected mass of private gun owners.
Offering overtime seems like one way of doing.

Many companies are burning the midnight oil in this crisis. A few weeks back I put in an order at 22:00 hrs and an hour later the order already had a tracking number and was boxed up and ready to go. So someone was there that late at night. The stuff was actually at the UPS depot at 07:something in the morning. Don't see why ammo companies would be any different.

Queen_of_Thunder
January 31, 2013, 11:01 AM
Ban or not, I don't see demand for ammo going down in the foreseeable future. Even in a worst case scenario where ammo purchases are limited, common calibers will be in high demand for the next few years at least. People are spooked by what has happened and what may still happen. If I was an ammo manufacturer, I would be producing at full capacity.
I also dont see things getting better soon. My plan is simply add to my stock of ammo and reloading supplies as money becomes available. I'm short on 41 mag bullets so correcting that shortage is my next purchase. Its just going to take a little more time and work to overcome these shortages.

jrdolall
January 31, 2013, 11:17 AM
Supply will get back to normal IF there are no major new laws passed in a relatively short time period.. How many people do you know that have not stocked up? I know there are a lot that got caught short but there are a lot, like me, that bought more than I will shoot in 2 years on some calibers because I could. As .223 or 9mm comes back into the store the people that got caught short will buy what they can and be like me whereas I will not buy any more for a while. If the manufacturers are truly ramped up then at some point in the near future the supply will catch up with demand. 6 months? A year? Nobody can answer that. If you do have the answer then feel free to share.

Akita1
January 31, 2013, 11:25 AM
At the last 3 local gun shows there was ammo available IF you were willing to pay market rate - around $1/rd - for it.
Amen to that - gun shows in FL same deal, ~$1/round for fmj 55gr .223. That's some expensive plinking! The bad part is the transfer of the panic to other cartridges - even supplying the ample appetite of my Speed Six and Glock 36 has become outlandish.

Capybara
January 31, 2013, 11:49 AM
Out here in California, we have two main ammo laws pending.

One will require an ammo buying permit, a $50.00 extortion fee, a background check every time you purchase ammo, no more Internet ammo sales and you are reported to local law enforcement every time you purchase more than a as of yet TBD amount (probably 500 rounds?)

The second law proposes a .05 per round tax on all ammo, which would effectively double the cost of .22LR and would boost up the cost of any other ammo significantly.

In this state, we have a 2/3 Democratic Supermajority, meaning that these ridiculous bills will probably be signed into law.

My goal is to acquire my lifetime supply of ammo within the next six months so these idiotic exercises in futility and harassment don't affect me.

Sniper66
January 31, 2013, 12:08 PM
I sure feel bad for you guys in California. Our problem in Kansas is a bit different. I went to Cabela's in KC yesterday and found the shelves picked clean of most reloading supplies. Asked them when they anticipated getting more stuff in they said that they get new stuff in 2-3 times a week ,but it sells by noon the same day!! WOW! I'm going to stock up when I get the chance, but not sure when that will be. Good luck everyone. Tom

Ignition Override
January 31, 2013, 12:28 PM
Trent:
What you stated in Bold Print is what I was afraid to bring up.

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