My first slamfire.....


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ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 06:35 AM
So I am setting here at my desk cleaning my nightstand gun (about 10 minutes ago), and being my nightstand gun I keep it cocked, locked, and ready to rock.. I reassyb. it, slide the magazine in, dropped the slide, and BAM!:eek::eek::eek::eek::eek: a 9mm hole right through my ceiling and ringing ears, which still are.....

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curlymaple42
January 29, 2013, 06:38 AM
Hence underlining the rule to ALWAYS point your weapon in a safe direction! Not sure what might be wrong with your gun, but glad nothing really bad happened to humans, apart from your ears...

Sent from my DROID RAZR

ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 06:42 AM
In my house if the gun had been pointed at the floor it would have ricocheted, my ceiling was thick enough to catch a slow traveling hollow point.

WoodchuckAssassin
January 29, 2013, 06:50 AM
What type of handgun was it, if you don't mind me asking? Striker fired? 1911?

45_auto
January 29, 2013, 06:53 AM
Good story that you can tell your wife and buddies so that it wasn't your fault.

Next time keep your finger off the trigger! ;)

ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 06:53 AM
@Woodchuck, We'll just say non striker fired (internal), wish I owned a 1911, and the type of gun is known best for not firing at all (not a Hi Point)...

Update: Ears still ringing, can't figure out how to patch hole in ceiling..

@45auto, No wife, no buddies, very strict with trigger discipline..

content
January 29, 2013, 06:55 AM
Hello friends and neighbors // Glad no one was hurt.

ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 07:01 AM
The hole, and casing

http://i46.tinypic.com/69l2rk.jpg

radiotom
January 29, 2013, 07:02 AM
Was it an old Glock?

wgaynor
January 29, 2013, 07:05 AM
I'd leave the hole as a reminder to the event. It's good to remember that things like this can happen.

ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 07:06 AM
Since I am embarrassed to own one of these things I'll let you all guess.

Hint: Its the only handgun in this photo.
http://i45.tinypic.com/oaxc7m.jpg

The others if anyone wonders are left to right: Remington 700 ACC-SD Tact, Weatherby PA-459, who-done-it AR, and a Moist Nugget.

WoodchuckAssassin
January 29, 2013, 07:06 AM
Hope it doesn't rain anytime soon :neener:

ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 07:08 AM
@Woodchuck, Ha... :p

Ears still ringing.

Walkalong
January 29, 2013, 07:28 AM
That was a negligent discharge. Never drop the slide on a live round in the house. While 99 times out of a hundred, or more, it won't go off, the possibility exists.

Glad everyone is OK, and I hope the ringing goes away soon.

mlkx4
January 29, 2013, 07:48 AM
Not a negligent discharge. It is not negligent to rack a round inside your house. It would be negligent to do it again with a problem pistol. He did nothing wrong except point the dam thing up.

SleazyRider
January 29, 2013, 08:00 AM
I, for one, would sure like to know the make, model, and condition of the weapon to get the full benefit of this thread.

tarosean
January 29, 2013, 08:07 AM
Jennings 9mm

What did I win?

JFtheGR8
January 29, 2013, 08:34 AM
I've contemplated making a box using old phone books as stop for racking the slide on a live round in my home. I think this has persuaded me to do so. What good is a home defense weapon that's not ready to go when you need it? I'm not gonna wait until someone breaks my door down to rack the slide on my gun.

Posted from Thehighroad.org App for Android

rdhood
January 29, 2013, 08:55 AM
I've contemplated making a box using old phone books as stop for racking the slide on a live round in my home. I think this has persuaded me to do so.

Ha! This is exactly what I thought when reading #1. I might even build one of these for my own home. I was thinking a barrel full of ballistic gel or something, but phone books would work.

El Mariachi
January 29, 2013, 09:01 AM
Get an old 5 gallon metal bucket (preferably with some cool artwork from a service station or something on it), fill it full of sand, plant some miniature ice plant in it, put next to your night stand and call it Shabby Chic.....

Ranger Roberts
January 29, 2013, 09:06 AM
It looks like it was a Bryco/Jennings or whatever they are going by these days!


edit: looks like Tarosean beat me to the answer...

JustinJ
January 29, 2013, 09:11 AM
Can i borrow the gun? My fiance has an obnoxious bird and i've been looking for ways to 'accidentally' do away with it.

"I duno what happened hon, the gun just went off and was coincidentally pointed in the bird's direction"

Trent
January 29, 2013, 09:48 AM
Those things only fire when you DON'T want them to.

:)

psyopspec
January 29, 2013, 10:26 AM
That was a negligent discharge. Never drop the slide on a live round in the house. While 99 times out of a hundred, or more, it won't go off, the possibility exists.

I've never heard this guideline before. What would or should one do if they live in an urban area? If they decide they can't in the house and outside that house is city for several miles in each direction, would you suggest that after cleaning their gun they drive to the country to chamber a round? Since NDs can also occur during what the shooter thinks is dry fire practice, should one never dry fire in their own home either even if they have a good backstop? Since others occur during disassembly that requires a trigger pull, is the solution then to not field strip a pistol in the home?

I just seems a little overbearing, but I'd like to hear more about what's guiding your thinking.

Tirod
January 29, 2013, 10:42 AM
The issue about it being "negligent" is mostly whether someone wants to own up to it being they way they handle the gun.

Insert the mag, drop the slide is common technique. Whatever, the cause was the firing pin had enough force to impress the primer. Was the round previously loaded and the nose nicked, causing it to protrude? Too much lube on the firing pin, or no spring to keep it from bouncing forward? Plenty of things cause a discharge.

How it gets interpreted being "negligent" is a matter of opinion. If a defect is widely known, maybe. Handling the weapon during cleaning and having it go off is the most well known circumstance. In that light, a lot of people would call it negligent.

As for the hole, plain white toothpaste - a little dab will do ya. If it went through the roof, don't ignore it. Slip a piece of milk jug plastic under the shingle with some roof cement on it to seal it up.

I've seen negligent discharges (not me!) and I don't think you can exercise too much caution. It's the number one circumstance - loading and unloading. It's why I prefer rifles with detachable magazines - you don't cycle the ammo thru the chamber (less nicks) and close the cocked bolt on one just to extract it. But, you chamber a round by letting the action spring ram the cartridge home, semi autos all do that. Therefore, always point it where it won't be a problem.

If the pistol is kept after this, a bucket of sand in the room might not be a bad idea.

Krogen
January 29, 2013, 10:46 AM
If the gun is "best known for not firing at all" and you now have had an "unplanned" discharge, I'd sure think twice before keeping it as a home defense gun. :what:

Analogkid
January 29, 2013, 10:56 AM
HMMM? I have several of the Bryco 9's, Jennings 9's and even a Jimenez 9.

How did you accomplish this? I don't even think there's a way to put them back together wrong and have that happen.

Was the Booger hook on the Bang switch when you *Racked one in the pipe*?

Spammy_H
January 29, 2013, 11:03 AM
I'd detail strip the slide and see if there's any gunk in the firing pin channel, or some other obstruction keeping the pin protruding forward.

I'm sorry to hear of your accident. I also disagree that this was a negligent discharge. If you don't pull the trigger, it shouldn't go off. Having said that, I agree that perhaps the ceiling might not have been the best direction to point when releasing the slide.

Having said that, I could see myself doing the same thing.

A friend of mine gave me this advice: Field strip & clean after every range trip, detail strip & clean once a year.

CLP
January 29, 2013, 11:34 AM
Does anyone know much about this handgun which would explain why or how this could have happened?
After I take my Glock to the range I clean it (not a detail strip), and since I use it for HD I load it before I store it. I do this indoors and pointed in a safe direction with finger off the trigger. I couldn't imagine this happening unless the firing pin had some inertia or there was a high primer. Do you reload? I can't imagine the flack I'd catch from my wife for ruining her floor if that happened with me. I'd be banished to the basement permanently.

c4v3man
January 29, 2013, 11:35 AM
Too much lube on the firing pin
Never heard that one before... it's not like "extra lube" makes it extra slippery... What design would possibly rely on metal-to-metal friction/stiction (which constantly changes depending on dirt/temperature... both of which constantly fluctuate in a firearm) to keep the firing pin from contacting a live primer?

The only problem extra lube should cause is perhaps rendering the loaded cartridge's primer inert if it's penetrating lubricant, or am I wrong?

Spammy_H
January 29, 2013, 11:40 AM
I'll preface my comments by saying that I have no familiarity with a Jennings/Bryco specifically. However, I am familiar with striker fired weapons in general, owing and shooting several of them, in addition to hammer fired weapons:

The problem with lube in the firing pin channel is that oil attracts dirt. The channel gets gunked up and the firing pin sticks. In a striker fired weapon, the firing pin in spring activated. Since the spring forces the pin forward, it's more likely to get stuck in the forward position, causing a slam fire.

I've always read to never lubricate the firing pin / firing pin channel for this reason. Clean it, but don't add lube to it.

rodregier
January 29, 2013, 11:52 AM
Question:

Was there a mark on the primer? (There is also an uncommon phenomena called a cocked primer.)

(Portable) products are made to create a safe backstop indoors for loading and unloading autopistols.

http://safedirection.com/

Silent Bob
January 29, 2013, 12:42 PM
Negligent to load a semiautomatic firearm in the house? That's a new one on me :rolleyes:

I guess only people in remote rural areas are allowed to load their semiautomatic firearms indoors.

Apartment dwellers like me are just SOL. Time to turn 'em in, I guess.

CLP
January 29, 2013, 12:47 PM
Question:

Was there a mark on the primer? (There is also an uncommon phenomena called a cocked primer.)

(Portable) products are made to create a safe backstop indoors for loading and unloading autopistols.

http://safedirection.com/
Cocked primer? What's that? Primer not fully seated?

Ragnar Danneskjold
January 29, 2013, 12:52 PM
Not negligent. Inserting a magazine and releasing the slide to chamber the first round is SOP for millions of gun owners. Nothing wrong with it. If that is indeed all the OP did, there's nothing negligent about it. The gun suffered a mechanical malfunction and fired when it should not have. That's a true Accidental Discharge, not Negligent.

See if it's still under warranty. If so, send it in to get it checked and fixed.

If the gun is "best known for not firing at all" and you now have had an "unplanned" discharge, I'd sure think twice before keeping it as a home defense gun.

This. A firearm that isn't mechanically reliable is not fit for any sort of defensive use. Period.

Ryanxia
January 29, 2013, 12:53 PM
Glad no one was hurt.

Lupinus
January 29, 2013, 12:54 PM
Failing to see how loading a home defense gun inside the house is in itself negligence.

Pointing it in an unsafe direction or doing so improperly is negligence.

sixgunner455
January 29, 2013, 12:55 PM
Keep the AR for HD.

ShroomFish
January 29, 2013, 01:21 PM
@Ragnar Danneskjold, The reason I kept this weapon for HD is because with out 500 rounds down the pipe I have never had a issue with it, I also call it the last resort since I keep my PA-459 beside my bed also..

ClickClickD'oh
January 29, 2013, 01:35 PM
Jennings 9mm

What did I win?

Yup, definitely negligence then...

Analogkid
January 29, 2013, 01:42 PM
I Don't doubt you have 500 rounds through it.
I have a well documented 3k plus through one of mine. I'd do another tear down and make to sure you dont have something lodged in the pin.

Make sure to see is the Firing pin is sliding freely. Use a drop of rem oil to ensure it is lubricated.

jdex
January 29, 2013, 01:54 PM
I believe you, I had the same thing happen to me with a star 9mm, went through a closet and file cabinet though.

SlamFire1
January 29, 2013, 02:31 PM
Looked at the Jennings 9mm parts at this page
http://www.gunauction.com/buy/10592997/pistols-for-sale/bryco-jennings-nine-9mm-parts-w-slide-and-mag

looks to be a striker fired mechanism, I dont see a hammer anywhere.

If the pistol slamfired than it is most likely you have a mechanical issue. With rifles I call it following, the sear did not hold the striker back and the striker and slide both went forward.

Bang. :what:

This is very serious as the thing can go off out of battery, and then you will have gun parts and brass particles all over the place along with a hole in the wall.

This pistol is not worth the gunsmithing to make it reliable, you are better off getting something better.

I found some parts availability, but ..........

http://www.homesteadparts.com/shopcart/Jimenez_Bryco_Jennings_9mm.htm

c4v3man
January 29, 2013, 02:34 PM
The problem with lube in the firing pin channel is that oil attracts dirt. The channel gets gunked up and the firing pin sticks. In a striker fired weapon, the firing pin in spring activated. Since the spring forces the pin forward, it's more likely to get stuck in the forward position, causing a slam fire.

I've always read to never lubricate the firing pin / firing pin channel for this reason. Clean it, but don't add lube to it.

I've heard the same thing as far as lube. Guess dirt jamming the firing pin forward didn't strike me as a problem attributed to lube, but I can see it being put that way.

The "decorative bucket of sand" sounds like the way to go... a lot cheaper than those bullet catchers/tubes I've seen at various gun shops I'd assume.

Somewhere in NM
January 29, 2013, 02:38 PM
ShroomFish, good job keeping it pointed in a safe direction. The safety rules are made to be redundant so even if one is accidentally broken or there is an unexpected malfunction (your case) no one gets hurt.

I would get rid of the gun and buy something more reliable. Everyone has their own preferences. I prefer SIGs because of their reputation for reliability and because I don't trust myself to safely/effectively manipulate a manual safety iin a high stress situation. Others like Glocks, and others have the 1911 manual of arms permanently grooved into their brains so it is best for them.

RetiredUSNChief
January 29, 2013, 02:39 PM
@Woodchuck, We'll just say non striker fired (internal), wish I owned a 1911, and the type of gun is known best for not firing at all (not a Hi Point)...

Update: Ears still ringing, can't figure out how to patch hole in ceiling..

@45auto, No wife, no buddies, very strict with trigger discipline..

Can't help you with the ringing ears...that's something only time will tell on. If it keeps up for very man more days, though, you should see a doctor. At any rate, you should see a doctor to document the extent of your hearing damage.


I CAN help you with the hole patching, though!

First of all, the ceiling is the LAST thing you need to worry about right now. Get up in the attic and find out where that bullet went. If it lodged in a ceiling or roof joist somewhere, then you're done with that. Maybe dig it out for a souvenir if you want.

Make sure no electrical wiring or plumbing was damaged...repair it if so. Same for any other collateral damage you may find to any other structure.

If the bullet went through the roof, then get up there and patch it. It's a simple matter of using a flatbar to carefully pry up the damaged shingles and seal the damage with tar paper and another shingle. Caulk the hole, too.

THEN fix the hole in the ceiling. That's a simple spackling job and paint touchup. The texture can be made to match the existing ceiling texture easily enough...and given the size of the hole, it's not going to be noticable to anyone after you paint over it, either.

Have fun!

:neener:

230RN
January 29, 2013, 03:29 PM
I have a shelf full of old real books for that purpose. I used to keep an old expired vest on the wall for an indoor "safe direction," but it looked like heck hanging there all the time.

So I just rearranged a shelf on my bookcase with "expendable" books and it fits in with the decor better. The length of the shelf is accessible from the side so that's the side I point the gun at. Any bullet would have to go through 2 1/2 feet of books to escape.

However, I still don't like manipulating a gun indoors.

I do it, but I don't like it.

I also strongly distrust SA striker fired handguns.

I have 'em, but I don't like 'em.

Terry, 230RN

General Geoff
January 29, 2013, 03:35 PM
That was a negligent discharge. Never drop the slide on a live round in the house. While 99 times out of a hundred, or more, it won't go off, the possibility exists.

I would agree with this only when it pertains to a firearm which you know to have a floating firing pin. Chambering a live round should pose zero risk of discharge in most modern pistol designs.

It is, however, prudent to have a 5-gallon bucket filled with sand, to point a firearm at while chambering a round in the house. :)

swalton1943
January 29, 2013, 03:45 PM
Bought a .22 Jennings at a local gunshow. Fired two rounds; the third shot made the gun blow up in my hand. Bit of case in my face; chip in my glasses in front of my eye. Stay away from them.

Dmath
January 29, 2013, 03:45 PM
I once a had a Remington .22 pump that would slam-fire with every single round. I was too young and ignorant to realize I should check out the firing pin. Then somebody solved the problem for me by stealing it. I heard no complaints, though.

As to the idea that a firing pin with no return spring has enough mass to detonate a primer I doubt it. Somebody on another board demonstrated that pretty convincingly with a 1911 slide with barrel, primed case, and loose firing pin, all held together and dropped, muzzle-first, inside a 15-foot length of PVC tubing. He also calculated that for a gun to fire in those circumstances, it would have to be dropped on its muzzle from a height of several thousand feet or something. . . . of course, this does assume that the hammer is down, not cocked and therefore not under spring pressure and only being held back by the sear. But, hammer down, a loose firing pin does not have the mass to detonate a primer.

In this case I would expect that the firing pin hole had some crud in it, holding the pin slightly protruding.

230RN
January 29, 2013, 03:55 PM
If it was a J9, the firing pin is not loose. It is held back by the sear. The problem, as I see it, is that the firing pin got jarred loose from the sear on slide closure, or did not engage the sear on the last retraction of the slide.

On the other hand, even autoloading guns with sprung firing pins dent the primer on closing. Very common with Garands and M1 Carbines. Scary when you eject a chambered round and see that little dent on the primer. However, things (springs, masses, primer sensitivity) are well-balanced in these guns so you almost never hear of a slamfire in these arms.

On the third hand, SKSs are known to slamfire if the firing pin channel gets dirty. There's a guy in Bowie, Texas who makes firing pin-return spring assemblies for replacing the loose {free-floating) firing pin in these rifles with a sprung one. He'll even do it for you through the mail (no FFL required if you're just sending the bolt alone in.)

Terry, 230RN

REF:

http://www.murraysguns.com/sksown.htm

Analogkid
January 29, 2013, 04:01 PM
Bought a .22 Jennings at a local gunshow. Fired two rounds; the third shot made the gun blow up in my hand. Bit of case in my face; chip in my glasses in front of my eye. Stay away from them.
I call bs.

Maybe it was reassembled incorrectly and the slide came off but I Highly doubt it *blew up*.
We have had several split cases and tons of Overcharged rounds and never grenaded the 4 we have.

But if you get the slide catawampus it can thork you in the brain box.

230RN
January 29, 2013, 04:25 PM
Amusing:

http://terpsboy.com/blogger6/Jennings-J-22.jpg

All that weight on the slide, you don't need much of a recoil spring.

:D

(Pic credit in properties)

RetiredUSNChief
January 29, 2013, 04:34 PM
Heh!

Correct me if I'm wrong here, but I'm guessing a lot of failure to ejects....and a lot of failure to feeds even if it does eject.

:):)

Ramone
January 29, 2013, 05:18 PM
I have a shelf full of old real books for that purpose. I used to keep an old expired vest on the wall for an indoor "safe direction," but it looked like heck hanging there all the time.

So I just rearranged a shelf on my bookcase with "expendable" books and it fits in with the decor better. The length of the shelf is accessible from the side so that's the side I point the gun at. Any bullet would have to go through 2 1/2 feet of books to escape.
Terry, 230RN


I use those two methods myself- about 40" of hardcovers I won't miss, and a NYPD issue Second Chance Vest inside a USMC issue Vest (circa '83), hung inside a closet door (with a 'keeper' strap to keep them in position).

Both are indicated with a used target- on the end of the shelf and the outside of the closet door- so they can double as dry firing 'safe directions'.

c4v3man
January 29, 2013, 05:52 PM
The best news is that whatever happened didn't happen again... would hate to imagine what could have happened if it continued to slam fire through the rest of the magazine...

EBK
January 29, 2013, 08:23 PM
That was a negligent discharge. Never drop the slide on a live round in the house. While 99 times out of a hundred, or more, it won't go off, the possibility exists.

Glad everyone is OK, and I hope the ringing goes away soon.
LOL so I am supposed to go outside to chamber a round in my HD gun?

Not sure the people in my apartment building would look kindly on that and almost 100% positive the police would get me for brandishing.

EBK
January 29, 2013, 08:28 PM
HMMM? I have several of the Bryco 9's, Jennings 9's and even a Jimenez 9.

How did you accomplish this? I don't even think there's a way to put them back together wrong and have that happen.

Was the Booger hook on the Bang switch when you *Racked one in the pipe*?
Not familiar with this firearms internal workings however if the firing pin is free floating the inertia from the slide/ bolt dropping will make a slight indent on the primer. Some soft primers can be set off during this action.

2nd 41
January 29, 2013, 11:02 PM
I had a slam fire with a S&W mod41 with a Clarks barrel. A Remington Golden did not feed entirely...I pulled back the slide..released it and the sucker discharged. I was at an indoor range. I was pointing downrange. No harm done...just shook me up. We can never be too safe. And don't ever think safeties do not fail. That goes for a safety on any devise. To the OP...glad you are ok.

bushmaster1313
January 29, 2013, 11:16 PM
Are there self loading pistols that cannot slamfire (because of their construction) even if the slide is racked with a finger pulling the trigger?

Impureclient
January 29, 2013, 11:40 PM
I'd leave the hole as a reminder to the event. It's good to remember that things like this can happen.
I did that with a bb gun hole in a hall closet door in our home. It was a new bb gun I was setting up for my son at the kitchen table. I don't know what happened as it happened so fast but I must have grabbed the trigger while looking the gun over. We immediately found the hole and I left it there as a lesson to why we practice safe handling.

Nobody mentioned about the hole at this point but the popcorn ceiling is an easy fix. They sell small containers of acoustic ceiling repair at Home Depot or Lowes or you can just use the regular smooth repair stuff and blend it in to the popcorn by balling up a little and dabbing it on the area after you have filled the hole with the patching compound. It really is easy to fix as the popcorn hides a lot of mistakes. I jammed a broom handle into the ceiling when I was younger and my parents had no idea as I quickly repaired it in minutes with an old tub of joint compound in the garage I found. The roof is trickier as being in FL, you probably have a shingle roof like most of us. If you are just renting, you will have to at minimum lift the shingle, patch it with tar paper and smear a bunch of tar under there. Small quantities of each can be had easily by asking a local roofer for a small sample of each. That hole will create a huge problem later if not repaired promptly. If you own it, then you are better off replacing the shingle. Getting an new one to match the old ones is the only problem. I have a couple small holes in shingles that were repaired with the paper and tar but I intend to redo the roof soon so I didn't pull the shingles because I didn't want a bad mismatch as the shingles are really at the end of their life. Maybe you got lucky and hit a roof beam.

El Mariachi
January 29, 2013, 11:50 PM
Fwiw, years ago when I was a kid and did property management for a r/estate company, my go-to popcorn ceiling fix was Colgate toothpaste and Quaker oats.







Yes, really.....:D

jamesbeat
January 29, 2013, 11:59 PM
Are there self loading pistols that cannot slamfire (because of their construction) even if the slide is racked with a finger pulling the trigger?
In theory, all semiauto pistols should behave that way.
The disconnector should prevent the pistol from firing until the trigger is released and pulled again.
The disconnector is activated by the slide moving backwards, so in theory you are doing this every time you fire the pistol.
The disconnector is there to prevent out-of-battery discharges and to provide semiauto operation.
If pistols didn't work this way, they would be full auto!

Trent
January 30, 2013, 08:07 AM
But if you get the slide catawampus it can thork you in the brain box.

That's the best description of a failure event that I've ever read.

230RN
January 30, 2013, 09:54 AM
SunnySlopes asked, post 60,


What is a "striker fired" handgun? Which models?

Also, what is a floating firing pin and which guns have it?


A striker fired gun is one where the firing pin itself is held back by the sear and is strongly sprung to jump forward to the primer when it is released from the sear, setting the primer off because of the energy of the spring pushing the firing pin (or "striker") that way.

These "strikers" are usually heavier than just a little pin in the gun.

There is no hammer in a striker-fired gun.

This is different from a hammer-fired gun, where the hammer strikes the light firing pin, driving it forward to strike the primer. The energy of the hammer transferred to the firing pin is what fires the primer by its own inertia, or, loosely, by its forward momentum.

A "free-floating" firing pin is one where the firing pin is not sprung lightly in either direction, but "floats" in a hole or groove in the action. It can be seen that a bit of dirt or other circumstances can "jam" the firing pin forward so that it protrudes from the breech face. When this happens and the slide or action closes, it hits the primer and sets it off. The SKS is of this type, and standard procedure in cleaning is to shake the bolt back and forth to make sure the firing pin moves freely in its groove. (When this happens, it is possible to "dump" a whole magazine-full in machine gun fashion. This is highly dangerous, obviously.)

Some firing pins are not "free-floating" in this way, but have a small spring to hold them back and retract them from the bolt face after they set off the cartridge. This is the nature of the gunsmith-in-Texas' business I referenced above: to install these springs in the otherwise free-floating firing-pin guns such as the SKS. A look at his site (noted in my post) will show many pictures of what is meant.

The M1911's firing pin is sprung backwards like this, and disassembly manuals caution one to keep the firing pin from flying out on disassembly. They can strike you in the face or eye when flying out of the back of the slide. Not to mention that they are difficult to find if your face or eye don't stop their travels.

Most bolt-action rifles are actually striker-fired. Among the exceptions are the M1 Garand and the M1 carbine, where there is an internal hammer which you can't see, and lever-action type rifles, where you can see the external hammer.

Many guns fire from the open-bolt position, where instead of a firing pin being released, they have an immovable firing pin mounted in the bolt face. Thus, when the bolt is released from its open position by the trigger and sear, the bolt flies forward, picking up a cartridge, and when it is seated, the immovable firing pin strikes the primer. When the bolt recoils upon firing, it is kept back in its open position by the trigger and sear until the trigger is pulled again.

I am sure others will add to my comments above, and they are welcome to, since it's bedtime for me and this is a pretty condensed version.

Feel free to ask questions.

Terry

mbt2001
January 30, 2013, 09:58 AM
Bought a .22 Jennings at a local gunshow. Fired two rounds; the third shot made the gun blow up in my hand. Bit of case in my face; chip in my glasses in front of my eye. Stay away from them.

I call bs.

Maybe it was reassembled incorrectly and the slide came off but I Highly doubt it *blew up*.
We have had several split cases and tons of Overcharged rounds and never grenaded the 4 we have.

But if you get the slide catawampus it can thork you in the brain box.

I am inclined to agree with you... I have owned a few of the Bryco, Lorcin, Jennings and while they are not Kimber's by any stretch of the imagination, I think that they are serviceable weapons and am sick of hearing the "they blow up in your face" crock. I have never seen one or heard a reliable story from someone who actually had one blow up. I have seen the pictures of FN's and Glock's that blew up, but no one is dogging them.

Get a Jimenez new, do fire a few mags (and only a few) at a stretch, clean them and maintain them and they will be decent weapons. Buy them poorly maintained and used up from some pawn shop for $20.00 and you are asking for trouble, as you would with any other gun you bought that was poorly maintained and used up.

Regarding the ND issue, there are a few possibilities; the one I favor is:

1) did the OP insert the mag and then push down the slide stop so that it rammed the cartridge home and if so had he done this many times with the same round? That could have caused an ND because of protruding firing pin or a weak/sensitive primer.

I do not disagree that striker fired guns could conceivably have problems, hell all guns have been ND'd... Vigilance is the order of the day.

Order one of these http://www.safedirection.com/. They are Kevlar and can stop a round. Handy little things. Certainly peace of mind cannot have a price put on it.

http://ravelingroup.com/images/205_7-AP_Rav01.jpg

Brno
January 30, 2013, 11:25 AM
...which is why I keep a pair of J-frame .38's bedside instead of a cocked and locked SA.

I realize this does not explain the slam fire in your situation, but it keeps me from ever having to explain one in mine.

Better safe than sorry.

c4v3man
January 30, 2013, 11:59 AM
Certainly peace of mind cannot have a price put on it
True, but that doesn't mean it's not overpriced. CTD has kevlar flak vests for $40 that can stop a 9 pretty reliably. I'd imagine that folding the vest a few times would stop anything a "handgun only" $180 pad would stop. Get a cheap, small steel plate to put behind it and you'd be in even better shape...

EDIT: Overpriced may be the incorrect term... better than what you need may be more appropriate. Obviously liability insurance, creating a clean, professional looking cover/hanger, etc costs money. I'm just saying there are other options that are far less than the cost of a decent .22 . Also $180 is halfway towards getting an actual class IIIA vest that you could keep bedside for the same purpose, but have the added utility of protection if needed.

Captaingyro
January 30, 2013, 01:04 PM
A federal agency I have trained with expects it's officers to chamber a round when loading their issue weapons at their residences. As a "safe direction", they recommend pointing at the baseboard of a stud wall on the ground floor. The idea is that a bullet will have to pass through the baseboard, then the sill plate of the stud wall, then the subfloor, and finally into the slab or crawl space.

Personally, I keep a three inch thick slab of maple in the shop for the same purpose. It's up against a wall with a concrete slab beyond. No holes in it so far, but I know the weapon is pointed at something I am perfectly willing to destroy.

mbt2001
January 30, 2013, 03:44 PM
I have a copy of harry potter 5 (hardback) that I use... :p

icanthitabarn
January 30, 2013, 04:08 PM
Wait for a good gun buyback program if these aren't off limits to you.

BHP FAN
January 30, 2013, 07:32 PM
Commercial drywall patch compounds cost less than $10.00 for a little bucket, and is really easy to use. get a plastic putty knife for $1.99, and you're in!put a little ''dollop'' in the hole so that it stands just a little out from the surrounding material, scrap across it with the putty knife, you're done. sand sparingly around and over the hole the next day if you want it invisible. I just did this for my kid's apartment for nail holes and such in the sheetrock when he was moving, and he got his deposit back!

PavePusher
January 30, 2013, 09:58 PM
Get an old 5 gallon metal bucket (preferably with some cool artwork from a service station or something on it), fill it full of sand, plant some miniature ice plant in it, put next to your night stand and call it Shabby Chic.....
Beat me to it.

Clearing barrel (bucket). Clearing Barrel (Or Bucket). CLEARING BARREL (OR BUCKET).

Can You Hear Me Now?

$5 of 5-gallon plastic bucket from a hardware or gardening store, and a few shovels-full of sand or dirt, put on lid, cut a 3" hole in the center of the lid.

CLEARING BARREL.

Are we clear on the concept yet?


Note: This comment is not meant to be aimed solely at the OP, it's for EVERYONE with guns.

230RN
February 2, 2013, 03:54 PM
^
Random factlet.

Actually, when I had my little garage machine shop, I used a clearing barrel. I can't testify to its effectiveness (lucky me!), but I read that it stops bullets better if the sand is dry. Wet sand doesn't stop bullets as efficiently. (At least for the .30-06 rifle bullet, even out to 1500 yards.)

At first glance, one would think the extra mass of water between the sand grains would stop bullets better, yes?

But noooo...

Big debate as to why: Water acts as a lubricant versus the idea that the impact shock wave is transmitted better through the water/sand medium and the sand tends to get out of the way of the bullet.

I never really found out why. Maybe both reasons.

A bullet bucket in my apartment would offend my feng shui advisor. And since I'm on the second floor, firing at a floor joist would be inadvisable, since the downstairs neighbors might object. So there really aren't any "safe directions" in my digs. Plus, I don't relish the thought of explaining to the managers why my roof is leaking from a 3/8" or 1/2" hole or why a bullet short-circuited the wiring.

In his building.

So for now, my bookshelf full of surplus books will do.

Terry, 230RN

Ref:

Hatcher's Notebook See table on page 408.

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