.38/.357 taper crimp die set?


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joel6180
January 29, 2013, 07:52 AM
I am in the process of obtaining all the equipment and supplies needed to reload for .38 special/.357 magnum. I got a Lyman 49th ed. manual to read before my shipment arrives, and have been reading internet reloading sites like this one.

Here is my question: I ordered RCBS .38/.357 dies with a taper crimp seating die, and all my reading says I should be roll crimping for revolver and lever action use. Should I keep the dies and get a single factory roll crimp die, or should I send the dies back to Midway and get the set with the roll crimp?

Thanks, Joel

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JSmith
January 29, 2013, 08:14 AM
It all depends. (That was helpful, I know.)

For example, I shoot Berry's plated bullets in .357 and .44 magnum. I have the Lee taper crimp/bullet seating die, but I don't crimp at all because the plating on those is very thin. The bullets in my reloads are only held in place by case tension.

If you're shooting lead or jacketed bullets, you'd want to crimp for that bullet type. Why not get both dies? That way you'll be all set.

hueyville
January 29, 2013, 08:21 AM
Jsmith is correct. U will want both. Standard practice for years were dies came with roll crimp then you ordered your taper if you needed it. Now they seem to give you more choices on the front end. Now for the kicker, whether to taper crimp or roll crimp if up to you and your needs. I tend to taper with autos and roll with wheel guns but not always. Bullet design and use dictates that. You really need both.

ScratchnDent
January 29, 2013, 08:29 AM
I use a taper crimp on all of my .38 and .357 loads, jacketed, lead, and plated, and have had no issues at all. BUT, I do not load to the top of the charts. My hottest loads are a 125 JHP at 1200 fps and a 158 lswc at 1100 fps. If one day I decide to go much hotter than that, I would probably want to use a roll crimp.

cfullgraf
January 29, 2013, 10:18 AM
I shoot alot of plated bullets in my 38 Special and taper crimp them as they do not have a crimp groove or canalure. In reality, it is not a crimp but the taper crimp die removes the mouth belling.

I roll crimp cast bullets with a crimp groove or jacketed bullets with a canelure.

murf
January 29, 2013, 11:50 AM
if you can afford it, get the extra roll crimp seating die. first, if you are going to shoot these loads in a tube fed rifle, you need a roll crimp die.

second, i believe seating and crimping should be performed in separate steps. with two seating dies, you can set one for seating and one for crimping and just switch them without having to adjust the die (consistent crimp and consistent seating).

get the roll crimp seating die imop.

murf

joneb
January 29, 2013, 12:18 PM
if you can afford it, get the extra roll crimp seating die. first, if you are going to shoot these loads in a tube fed rifle, you need a roll crimp die.

^I agree^
Having the extra seating die will make it easy to seat and crimp separately.
It wouldn't hurt to have a under sized flaring stem in case more tension is needed.

mdi
January 29, 2013, 01:55 PM
For a new reloader I would suggest you get a roll crimp die in addition to the taper crimp die you have. For 90% of reloading for a revolver it's best to start using bullets with a crimp groove or cannalure, no OAL/seating depth worrys. Another hint, separate your seating and crimping into two operations (adjust die to seat to the crimp groove, readjust die to put a roll crimp in the groove). If you choose to load none cannalured/grooved bullets, then use the taper crimp. Works for me for 30+ years...

ArchAngelCD
January 29, 2013, 02:08 PM
I didn't know RCBS even had a 38/357 die set with a tapper crimp die. IMO a roll crimp is a necessity with revolver ammo unless you're loading plated bullets. I bought a 38/357 tapper crimp die because I load a lot of Speer shotshell snake shot and it lessens the chance of cracking the capsules.

IMO you should have bought the RCBS die set #18212 instead of the #18215 you did buy.

GLOOB
January 29, 2013, 02:45 PM
If you plan to ever shoot cast bullets with a crimp groove, I would personally prefer a regular seating die with roll crimp over a factory crimp die. The factory crimp die is a post-sizing die that will significantly squeeze down the bullet with certain bullet N brass combinations, which can lead to reduced neck tension and even poor accuracy and leading.

But I'd be sure to experiment with the taper crimp die, first. Depending on how it is cut, it might be able to do a decent roll crimp if it's adjusted far enough.

Walkalong
January 29, 2013, 02:48 PM
Unless you are going to use plated bullets, you will use the roll crimp far more.

For most taper crimps on revolver rounds you do not want to do it when seating. Get the roll crimp seater set and buy a separate taper crimp only die (Lee's is $12, Reddings is $22(give or take a buck)) and then you can roll crimp or taper crimp.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=6354182&postcount=7
.

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=469815&page=2

dsb1829
January 29, 2013, 04:06 PM
Keep the dies. Add a roll crimp.

I use the TC for most, even on cannelured bullets. My largest volume is a 125g truncated cone that I seat past the roll crimp groove and taper crimp just below the edge of the cone. That is a light IDPA load though.

With 38/357 I get shaving unless I seat/crimp seperately, even using the cowboy expander. My 44mag and 45Colt don't have that issue despite being simillar ctgs.

cfullgraf
January 29, 2013, 04:24 PM
I didn't know RCBS even had a 38/357 die set with a tapper crimp die.

I learned of the taper crimp set a few years ago but bought one a couple years ago when I bought my Hornady L-N-L progressive. I wanted a dedicated set of dies set up for 38 Special only and set up my existing 38 Special/357 magnum dies for 357 Magnum only.

For others, I prefer to crimp in a separate step, but it by no means has to be done that way. Easy-peasy on the Hornady progressive.

joneb
January 29, 2013, 06:54 PM
Some 9x19 seat'n TC crimp dies can be adjusted for 38spl/357 mag.

joel6180
January 29, 2013, 07:49 PM
Thanks for all the input. I have decided to keep the dies, and get an additional roll crimp die. Thanks again, Joel

BYJO4
January 29, 2013, 09:05 PM
I always use roll crimp on bullets that have a crimping groove which is almost all the bullets used for revolvers.

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