Lightweight snubbies


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Godsgunman
January 29, 2013, 01:11 PM
So this past weekend I took my mother (64) to the shooting range since she has requested my help with her buying her first ever handgun. She grew up around guns but has never owned one herself. The range I am a member at has rental guns so I figured we could rent a couple and see how they fit her. I brought along my 3" Taurus 65 .357 and my Glock 26 so she could shoot those also. Anyways I rented this light weight 2" Ruger .38 snubby for her to try also (sorry dont recall the exact model) but boy did that thing kick like a mule! Far worse than any mag load out of my Taurus and even worse then shooting 00 buck out of my Judge when I used to have one. I was just using 130gr target .38 sp loads, not even +P. I am not usually recoil sensitive but I was truly shocked at how unpleasant this little snubby was to shoot. I didn't even let my mother try it out because it even bothered my palm after 5 shots. She did enjoy shooting the Taurus and even the Glock and shot them fairly well.
I guess what I'm getting at is I found these "airweight" snubs to be unpleasant shooters, at least that one. I know they fit the niche for light weight carry options but I myself prefer something with a little more heft in the revolver arena and more manageable recoil. After shooting that snubby I find my Taurus to be a great compromise between concealability and manageable recoil for follow up shots even with full load magnums.
And the search is still on for the right gun for my mom, good excuse for more range time :p.

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Bikewer
January 29, 2013, 01:17 PM
I have to say that other than a S&W M29 with full-house loads, one of the most unpleasant handguns I've ever fired was an "airweight" Chief's Special with fairly hot loads and stock grips.
Nasty...
However, my little Taurus stainless "Chief's" knockoff, equipped with Pachmayr grips, is quite pleasant to shoot.

DammitBoy
January 29, 2013, 01:22 PM
Easiest light weight snubby I ever shot; a CharterArms Bulldog Pug in .44 special

The worst snubby I've ever shot; my Ruger Alaskan in .454 and it's not light.

My Chiefs Special in .38 special was somewhere in the middle of those two...

DMK
January 29, 2013, 01:25 PM
I have two 5 shot 2" snubbies, a Smith 642 (all lightweight alloy) and an SP101 (all stainless steel).

38 specials in the 642 are more unpleasant to shoot than 357 mags in the SP101.

DammitBoy
January 29, 2013, 01:39 PM
Good point DMK, my favorite snubby is my Ruger SP101 with any load!

David E
January 29, 2013, 01:47 PM
Sounds like you need to find the right load more than finding the right gun.

Go back and shoot that "lightweight Ruger" (must be the LCR) with 148 grain (not 158, but 148) FULL wadcutters used for bullseye shooting. She will like it much better.

Finding the right gun is only part of the equation. Finding the right load, in this case, is far more important.

mj246
January 29, 2013, 01:49 PM
I'm betting the Ruger snubby was an LCR (OP; was it all black and gray or stainless steel?). Given that the 38+p version only weighs 13.5 ounces unloaded, I would definitely imagine the recoil being a bit stiff. I personally have never seen a huge draw to the super lightweight snubbies. I don't find a revolver weighing 20-25 ounces to be very heavy for carrying, and definitely helps for actually shooting.

Granted, I have only carried around the house for a few hours at a time because I'm still saving up to get my CCW, so I could maybe understand getting one that's 16-18 ounces or so. However, I just feel that something much lighter than a pound would recoil too sharply for fast follow-up shots whether the recoil bothers your hand or not. JMO and YMMV. If you like it and are comfortable with an airweight, more power to ya.

EDIT to ADD: If she likes the overall feel of the LCR, you could always try to find a 357 one to rent, but shoot 38s in it. The 357 version weighs a few ounces more and likely would tame the recoil of standard pressure or +P 38s much better than the 13.5 ounce 38+p only version.

easyg
January 29, 2013, 02:11 PM
I would not recommed a snub-nose revolver for any female.
They are not easy guns to master.
They have a short sight radius and a heavy double-action trigger pull.
And they are very slow to reload.

I would recommend something like an XDS in 9mm, or a Ruger SR9c.

mdauben
January 29, 2013, 02:32 PM
Anyways I rented this light weight 2" Ruger .38 snubby for her to try also (sorry dont recall the exact model) but boy did that thing kick like a mule!
IMO "snubbies" are generally poor choices for beginning shooters. They may seem good because they are so small and light, but those are actually flaws for anything except concealed carry. Light weight guns recoil badly even with normal .38spl rounds, let alone +P or .357 ammo. The short sight radius and often rudimentary sights make them hard to shoot accuratly.

Personally, I might suggest you consider a "K-Frame" like the S&W Model 10. A not too big and heavy but much easier and more comfortable to shoot than a light weight small frame. If you want something a little smaller for conceled carry, look at a steel frame gun like the S&W Model 60 or the Ruger SP101, either with a 3-4 inch barrel.

David E
January 29, 2013, 02:54 PM
I would not recommed a snub-nose revolver for any female.

She proved she could shoot them, but they weren't loaded with the proper ammo.

They are not easy guns to master.
They have a short sight radius

It's not hard to shoot "minute of badguy" at five to ten feet.

and a heavy double-action trigger pull.

The LCR has a fairly smooth and light pull.

And they are very slow to reload.

It's over, one way or another, by the time the gun is empty. She's not trying out for the SWAT team or Action Pistol team.

I would recommend something like an XDS in 9mm, or a Ruger SR9c.

Where chambering the first round might be extremely difficult? Where a weak wrist or improper hold would induce a malfunction?

This isn't a gun for US, guys, it's a gun for a 64 yr old woman who has never owned a gun before.

Revolvers are easy to understand, easy to shoot (point and pull) and won't jam due to weak wrists. Load it properly (for her) with the aforementioned 148 grain wadcutters and she will be fine.

Godsgunman
January 29, 2013, 02:54 PM
mj246,
It was all black and gray so yeah it was the lcr. We will definitely stick to the stainless steel models and I think at least a 3" barrel. As i said she shot my 65 pretty well once she got the hang of the sights. I was just not expecting the lcr to be that bad but I guess thats a compromise some people are willing to make to carry something all day. Not for me though, don't mind a little more weight. I like to know its there, not have something so light I could forget and not shoot accurately because of recoil.

David E
January 29, 2013, 02:57 PM
mj246,
It was all black and gray so yeah it was the lcr. We will definitely stick to the stainless steel models and I think at least a 3" barrel. As i said she shot my 65 pretty well once she got the hang of the sights. I was just not expecting the lcr to be that bad but I guess thats a compromise some people are willing to make to carry something all day. Not for me though, don't mind a little more weight. I like to know its there, not have something so light I could forget and not shoot accurately because of recoil.

You are still overlooking the importance of load selection.

premier1
January 29, 2013, 03:19 PM
I'm sure your mother isn't going to be spending countless hours on the range.So giventhat fact she might have her longest shot ever across a room,with that being said I don't see anything wrong with a snub.If she does wish to do range shooting I would suggest like others here to use 148gr. wadcutters and since she's not going to be carrying this daily why not go with a standard weight snub like a Taures model 85.

Mosbyranger
January 29, 2013, 03:27 PM
Ruger SP 101's are hard to beat imho. If you can find one with a 3 inch barrel, have her try it. My son bought one and it is a real soft shooter even with .357's compared to my 2" in 38 Sp. Ruger also makes them with a 4 inch barrel, but that is a rara avis, at least around here.
MR

jimbo555
January 29, 2013, 09:17 PM
I gave my daughter a s&w model 60,the original stainless version of the model36. She shoots it just fine with standard pressure hollow points. She loves to shoot that snubby and refuses to give it back no matter how hard I try! -

DammitBoy
January 29, 2013, 10:51 PM
I've lost two Ruger SP101's with 3" barrels to my daughter and my wife. They love shooting them and are quite accurate with them.

IllinoisGun
January 30, 2013, 01:12 AM
Myself, I've never had an issue with me wife shooting my S&W 442. No lock, of course.

Water-Man
January 30, 2013, 01:34 AM
Sounds like the OP is the one who is recoil sensitive.

If the OP has a problem with the LCR, he'll have a problem with all the Smith J frames as well.

mauiglide
January 30, 2013, 04:27 AM
I bought a Model 638 Airweight last fall which is my first J frame revolver and the first thing my FFL dealer said to me was that I should expect a bit of recoil. I don't consider myself to be recoil sensitive but shooting this revolver with the stock two finger grip was uncomfortable to say the least. I was shooting American Eagle standard pressure ammo and some Remington +P ammo. I decided to mount a set of Nill grips which are larger than the factory scales. I've not shot it since I've installed the new grips but just holding the revolver with the new grips makes the gun feel much more comfortable and controllable. I'll see how it is next time at the range.

Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX using Tapatalk 2

David E
January 30, 2013, 11:42 AM
I've never seen an SP-101 with a trigger as light and smooth as the LCR. It'll be more difficult to master the hard DA pull on the SP-101

I've observed over the years that people who claim to be "good with a revolver" are firing it single action; a technique not suitable for fast and furious close range defense encounters.

Only one other poster seems to agree that LOAD SELECTION MATTERS.

ETXhiker
January 30, 2013, 11:57 AM
If your mother isn't going to be carrying, or will be carrying in a purse, there is no reason to go with a super light weight gun that kicks a lot, but I agree that a revolver is a good choice for new shooters. How about a 4" .38 in a K-frame Smith?

easyg
January 30, 2013, 02:19 PM
She proved she could shoot them, but they weren't loaded with the proper ammo.
I didn't say a female cannot shoot a snubbie...it's just that they are very difficult to shoot accurately, especially when the adrenaline is jacked up and the person is fearing for their life.

It's not hard to shoot "minute of badguy" at five to ten feet.
Actually, it's harder than some folks might think.
Especially with a snubbie.

The LCR has a fairly smooth and light pull.

Smooth and light are subjective.
For a man with strong hands and strong fingers it might seem smooth and light, but for an elderly woman it might seem heavy.


It's over, one way or another, by the time the gun is empty.

It will certainly be over if you empty your 5-round cylinder without hitting your attacker and that attacker still has 10 rounds in his pistol.

Where chambering the first round might be extremely difficult?

You don't wait till your door is being kicked in before chambering a round.

Where a weak wrist or improper hold would induce a malfunction?

Limp wristing is rather rare. About as rare a bullet jumping the crimp and locking up a revolver.

This isn't a gun for US, guys, it's a gun for a 64 yr old woman who has never owned a gun before.

Exactly! And I can't think of a worse handgun to recommend than a light-weight snubbie.

Revolvers are easy to understand, easy to shoot (point and pull) and won't jam due to weak wrists.

Yeah, she's a older woman so she can't possibly understand and operate something as complicated as a Ruger SR9c or an Springfield XDS. :rolleyes:

Please stop treating treating the women like they're idiots.
And please give her a better weapon than a 5-shot light-weight snubbie.

WhippingBoy
January 30, 2013, 02:37 PM
I took my CCW class using an Airweight 38. After 100 rounds the web of my hand was bleeding in a number of places. The stock rubber grip was a real punishment.

Anyhow, I had a similar situation when my own mother wanted a handgun. The guy at the gun store had talked her into an M&Pc in 9mm. She's 77. Her fingers aren't strong enough to load that gun. I'm sure he gave her his best smarmy-used-car-salesman trick to get her to buy something expensive.

I will give that store credit for taking it back, although it was unfired.

In the end she got the Walther PK380. The slide is easy to move for her and the grip is small enough for her to hold on to. Also, recoil was not beyond her control; in fact, it was minimal. We went right over to the range and she did quite well for never having owned a gun in her life.

Drail
January 30, 2013, 04:30 PM
I have always believed that a snub revolver is just about the most reliable handgun you can carry (assuming good ammo). Snubbies are great. Very Lightweight Alloy/Polymer snubbies in Magnum calibers are just silly. Mass is your friend - in handguns.

heeler
January 30, 2013, 04:51 PM
I owned a Smith model 37 Air Weight and ended up selling due to how unpleasant it was to shoot.
Horrible recoil.
Now it's true I never tried those 148 gr. wad cutters but I did use the plain fmj 130 and 158 gr. ammo.
At times on the auto forum I hear people complain how bad the recoil is on pocket 380's.
They are no where near the recoil of these lightweight snubs.
I would never recommend one of these snubs in a 38 Special or larger calibers to a woman.

David E
January 30, 2013, 05:51 PM
Please stop treating treating the women like they're idiots.

The women aren't the idiots. The misguided men who are "helping" them are.

joeschmoe
January 30, 2013, 06:17 PM
A steel .38 will have far less recoil than the lightweights. Reducing it's weight increases the felt recoil. Mass helps reduce the felt recoil.

For someone who is recoil sensitive, a heavier (steel) gun with light loads (not +p) would be best. I suggest an all steel S&W or Ruger in .38 sp.

btg3
January 30, 2013, 07:37 PM
... and then there is the 642 thread. Just for perspective, mind you.

Bentonville
January 30, 2013, 07:42 PM
We have an Air Weight J frame and my wife is deadly accurate with it, one or two hands. She likes the wadcutters. I got a few boxes of the S&B and they offer a mild recoil and not such a blast. My wife actually enjoys shooting it, as do I. She is planning to get her concealed carry license soon and this revolver is just the ticket.

greyling22
January 30, 2013, 08:02 PM
let her get what she wants and then load it with a mag primer and 2 grns of unique or similar powder for a practice load.

mnhntr
January 30, 2013, 08:43 PM
I have the revolver you shot. It is an LCR and I love it. The wife has a 642 S&W and I do not care for it. It is all about what fits you. The LCR lets me get a higher purchase on the grip and control the weapon better than the 642. The wife shoots the 642 better.

David E
January 30, 2013, 09:49 PM
The LCR lets me get a higher purchase on the grip and control the weapon better than the 642. The wife shoots the 642 better.

Sounds like you have the wrong grips on the 642. You need the ones that are open back, as this is what allows you to get your hand higher on the backstrap. Ideally, Craig Spegel grips, altho they are pricey.

S&Wfan
January 31, 2013, 02:52 AM
My wife shoots the snot out of her S&W Model 37 Airweight, and a law enforcement firearms instructor told her she shot better than most of their deputies.

It is truly a matter of mastering the high grip with an Airweight, and if one does, it isn't bad to shoot at all!

An Airweight snubbie is my "always" (on me) handgun. Wonderful revolver indeed as long as someone doesn't grip it "low and loose!"

Grips? We use the stock S&W magnas from 1971 (the year our Airweight Model 37s were made), or American Elk stag magnas . . . plus Tyler T-grips.

scotjute
January 31, 2013, 04:51 PM
I've owned airweight in .38 spl and don't like shooting them either. Get the all-steel version (that weigh 21-23 oz. vs 15 oz.)for more manageable recoil. My smallest gun that I use now is S&W 649 all stainless. The SPS 101 and short-barrelled Security Six are even bigger and better (but that's part of the trouble, they're bigger).

niner4tango
January 31, 2013, 05:42 PM
Between the 629 and the 442 Airweight below: if you show both to an inexperienced shooter (men or women) and ask them to guess which has more recoil, you almost always get something like "that big one looks like a hand cannon, the little one looks more my style". But, compared to the 38 spl Airweight, the 44 mag is a pussycat.

Big guns are easier to shoot, but it seems everyone has to experience it for themselves to believe it!

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d21/niner4tango/rsz_img_0305_zps97a89488.jpg

Vern Humphrey
January 31, 2013, 06:00 PM
Everyone makes .357s these days that are horrendous to shoot. The answer is either get a bigger gun (the Ruger SP 101 would be my choice) or stick to .38 specials.

Matt Dillon
January 31, 2013, 07:18 PM
Folks, there are airweights, and then there are airweights. A good friend of mine has a S&W 342, which, I believe, is a scandium model with a titanium cylinder. Extremely lightweight, it feels almost like a toy gun, until you shoot it. A buddy of mine was dead set on getting one, and I had him shoot my friend's 342, and his hand was bleeding after shooting less than a box of .38s through it.
On the other hand, the S7W 442 is aluminum framed (with steel cylinder and barrel), weighs a little more, but is not uncomfortable to shoot at all. I have a large Crimson Trace Laser grip rubber wrap around grip on it, and it is very manageable and I have shot hundreds of rounds through it with no problems from the recoil. I suggest staying away from the lightest of these J frames but can highly recommend a 442 for manageable recoil and comfortable carrying.

niner4tango
January 31, 2013, 07:52 PM
Well, the 642 and the 442 are the same gun, both aluminum frame, but one is stainless and the other is carbon steel. Both weigh 15 oz.

Matt, you make an excellent point, the grips make a world of difference. When I run the classic grips like below, recoil is like a 2x4 to the hand. The boot grips above are a lot better. Lots of people could benefit by going to a larger grip.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d21/niner4tango/442_1.jpg

mnhntr
January 31, 2013, 08:46 PM
Better check your facts. The 642 and 442 are the same gun in different finishes. They weight the exact same amount. Also for those who are claiming the J frames or snubbies are hard to shoot needs to shoot a few. My wife who had zero handgun experience was shooting a pie plate at 25yds after some practice:eek:. She qualified with it at her CCW class:neener:. She and I can shoot both of our snubbies without bleeding hands:rolleyes:. They are easier to manipulate than the slide of any semi auto. I worked in a gun shop and it would always amaze me when the male half would say that the female with them needed a Glock or M&P ect.. and when I would show the female the pistol and how it operates the could not clear a malfunction or even chamber a round leaving them with a plastic hammer. Folks, there are airweights, and then there are airweights. A good friend of mine has a S&W 642, which, I believe, is made of titanium. Extremely lightweight, it feels almost like a toy gun, until you shoot it. A buddy of mine was dead set on getting one, and I had him shoot my friend's 642, and his hand was bleeding after shooting less than a box of .38s through it.
On the other hand, the S7W 442 is aluminum framed (with steel cylinder and barrel), weighs a little more, but is not uncomfortable to shoot at all. I have a large Crimson Trace Laser grip rubber wrap around grip on it, and it is very manageable and I have shot hundreds of rounds through it with no problems from the recoil. I suggest staying away from the lightest of these J frames but can highly recommend a 442 for manageable recoil and comfortable carrying.

greenmtnguy
February 1, 2013, 12:02 AM
While I can shoot a box of 38+P with my 642 in one sitting, it isn't pleasant by the end. I still think that a "regular" steel 38 SPL or 357Mag (loaded with 38s) 3" or 4" revolver in a K frame or similar size would work for her - at least for her to try out with different grips to see what she likes. My mother - with very arthritic hands - was unable to work the slide well on several semi autos she tried. A regular SA/DA revolver worked though. Be sure to check her finger strength both in SA and DA mode on any handgun.

S&Wfan
February 1, 2013, 12:11 AM
Amen brother!

And the little J frames CAN shoot accurately too.

mnhntr
February 1, 2013, 12:24 AM
You need different grips.

David E
February 1, 2013, 10:52 AM
The scandium J-frame model numbers start with a 3.

The scandium framed cousin to the 642/442 is the 342.

Yes, it kicks. I'd never load it with .357's myself.

Godsgunman
February 1, 2013, 11:21 AM
Well we are still in the process of looking, most likely going to be a K frame of some sort as that is what she has liked the best so far. She did like my Glock but as many have said she does lack some strength in her fingers and wrist for manipulating the slide and "limp wristing". She actually caused the first ever "choke" with it, but I remedied that by changing her grip on it. So the search continues I'm definitely letting her decide and I'm just there to help her with her shooting techniques and what not but right now it looks like a 3-4" K frame is where she's comfortable. Also I'm starting to reload so I will probably work up a good load that she can shoot comfortably and consistantly.

mnhntr
February 1, 2013, 11:28 AM
Get her a S&W 65 and have a good smith bob the hammer and do a trigger job and still be in the gun for less than $500

GEM
February 1, 2013, 12:48 PM
While not that easy to find, there are the 32 HR Mag snubbies out there. They are not as hard on the hands and one can go down to the lesser 32 loads. Some are even hollow points.

Yes, they are not Man-Stoppers but if you want someone to get rounds into a target - which will stop the vast majority of incidents, you might look at that.

CDNN was selling Taurus 32s fairly cheaply. Note, I have SW revolvers but it's a thought.

My kid, a small woman, hated the 642. She did like a snubby Colt Cobra with standard 38 SPL and a Glock 19.

Old Fuff
February 1, 2013, 02:48 PM
The Old Fuff is a firm believer in matching a cartridgeís power to the size and weight of the platform one proposes to carry it in. Various folks have different degrees of recoil they can tolerate. Thus if the little S&W J-frame, or similar revolvers made by Ruger and Taurus, are under consideration perhaps using a lighter .38 Special mid-range wadcutter loaded with a 148 grain bullet may prove to be a good solution. If thatís still too much consider something chambered in .32 H&R Magnum, that can be used with even lighter .32 S&W Long or .32 S&W ammunition. Finely if the little Ruger LCR is your cup of tea, notice that it is now available in .22 WRM, as are other small revolvers made by S&W and Taurus.

1canvas
February 1, 2013, 08:37 PM
my wife carries a 642 with a trigger job with the larger CT grips and has no problems with Gold Dot Short Barrel. its important to have good grips and the right hold on the gun.

bubba in ca
February 1, 2013, 11:14 PM
i think light-weight snubbies are for desk jockeys and backup guns. For normal use, get a steel gun. training will be easier and you won`t pick up a flinch as bad.

I recently went through a series of guns for a woman older than 64. We ended up with a ruger single action .22. That is the only gun she had the strength to use.

Practice at 5 feet with a human size target and emphasize the triple tap. train for reality.

royal barnes
February 2, 2013, 04:50 PM
Desk jockeys??!!! I have a Colt Cobra in my pocket and I shoot it very well. Thanks for your insightful comment.;)

mnhntr
February 2, 2013, 05:27 PM
i think light-weight snubbies are for desk jockeys and backup guns. For normal use, get a steel gun. training will be easier and you won`t pick up a flinch as bad.

I recently went through a series of guns for a woman older than 64. We ended up with a ruger single action .22. That is the only gun she had the strength to use.

Practice at 5 feet with a human size target and emphasize the triple tap. train for reality

Ya any man worth his salt would choose a Single Action 22 over snubby .38 for defense.:rolleyes:I am still trying to determine the "triple tap" method with a single action 22.:banghead:I actually can't.:confused: find the "reality" in this post

PedalBiker
February 2, 2013, 05:57 PM
My mom can't shoot autos. She does just fine with revolvers. My wife can shoot either, but prefers a revolver. My wife prefers a Taurus 85 to an SR9c.

I shoot the Gold Dot 135g +p short barrel in my 638 bodyguard, it's brisk recoil, but not that bad.

Trail Boss makes good 38 sp loads.

My mom was shooting 38s the other day and I was surprised at the noise and flame. I forgot that the box she was shooting was 6g of Power Pistol. That's the same powder charge for a 9mm. She didn't seem to notice, so I didn't say anything.

easyg
February 3, 2013, 02:29 AM
My mom can't shoot autos. She does just fine with revolvers.
Why can't she shoot autos?

My mother is 73 years old and can shoot her Glock 19 just fine. :confused:


My wife can shoot either, but prefers a revolver. My wife prefers a Taurus 85 to an SR9c.
So your wife can't shoot an auto or a revolver, but prefers a 5-shot revolver with a 10+ lbs trigger pull over a 10-shot auto with a 6 lbs trigger pull???

This makes no sense whatsoever.

Old Fuff
February 3, 2013, 11:53 AM
This makes no sense whatsoever.

Oh I don't know about that. They're lots of folks that prefer revolvers. For example limp-wristing won't shut one down, and if you have to shoot below eye level you won't have fired brass peppering you in the face. You are unlikely to have an unexpected discharge which can happen if you have one of those shell-shuckers where the only manual safety is a little lever in the trigger's finger piece. For some, magazine capacity isnít everything.

Have a little ol' grandma lady living nearby who just bought one of the new Smith & Wesson Bodyguard .38 Special's with a laser sight. Anybody who bothers her with evil intentions will likely regret it.

Hoppes Love Potion
February 3, 2013, 11:55 AM
I'm with Old Fuff...match the power to the weight.

J-frame alloy - .22LR, .22 Magnum
J-frame steel - .38 Special
K-frame - .38 Special
L-frame - .357 Magnum
N-frame - .357 and .44 magnum

Old Fuff
February 3, 2013, 12:04 PM
Incidentally, Bill Jordan - The Border Patrol's fast draw ace, recommended a lightweight J-frame chambered in .22 WRM as a back-up gun, and he had plenty of experience to back up his opinion.

royal barnes
February 3, 2013, 01:51 PM
Mr. Jordan was also very high on alloy framed revolvers in .38, notably the Colt Agent, as a pocket rocket when hot weather precluded carry of his full size revolver.:)

ZVP
February 3, 2013, 05:21 PM
if you think a "J" Frame recoils try a .38 Special from a Remington style Derringer!
The Factory (Cobra) sells a nice set of Rosewood Grips with thumb/Index finger groovs that help maintain control.
ZVP

5-SHOTS
February 3, 2013, 05:55 PM
I had the occasion to shoot a S&W 342, a 637 and a Colt Cobra. The first was unplesant at best, the second was much better and with the Colt I had to adjust the grip after every shot due to its slippery wooden grips. Even the steel ones are not pussycats (I had a 649 Bodyguard and I currently own a Ruger SP101).

royal barnes
February 3, 2013, 06:23 PM
5-Shots, It's old school but try a Tyler T Grip on that Cobra. I have one on my Cobra and my Agent. Makes a big difference.:)

Deer_Freak
February 3, 2013, 07:00 PM
Several Durham county sheriffs officers went in together and made a bulk purchase of Ruger 357 LCR revolvers. I don't know what caused this to happen but the officers sold several of the Rugers with in a month or so. Every time I went to DCWC there was another sign on the board for a Ruger LCR with a deputies card attached to sign. Why did these deputies want to sell the LCR's? I have no clue. I called about 2 of the LCR's and I got evasive answers to my questions so I did not buy one. I have heard rumors (never saw damage first hand) about the frame not holding up to a lot of 357 rounds. They might have had problems qualifying with the LCR. I don't know.

5-SHOTS
February 3, 2013, 07:42 PM
Hi royal barnes, thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately the Cobra was not mine and it's a gun I regret to not have purchased from its owner that he is also a good friend of mine. Now it's long gone to someone smarter than me...

Old Fuff
February 3, 2013, 07:50 PM
They might have had problems qualifying with the LCR. I don't know.

If they had to use .357 Magnum ammunition they might indeed had problems. :eek:

The little LCR makes an interesting .38 Special, but the magnum version much less so. Here again we have a platform that isn't balanced for the round it's chambered in. The revolver would probably hold up, but the shooter might not. :uhoh:

Ankeny
February 3, 2013, 07:57 PM
Also for those who are claiming the J frames or snubbies are hard to shoot needs to shoot a few. I have owned several J Frames and I think they are hard to shoot in comparison to guns that are easier to shoot.:D I no longer even own a J-Frame because they are indeed difficult to shoot fast and accurately.

royal barnes
February 3, 2013, 08:19 PM
They are certainly harder to shoot than those with 4" and 6" barrels but they can be mastered with practice. I shot several hundred rounds through lw snubs before I felt confident in carrying one. Now I shoot 50 to 60 rounds a month as a refresher. I carry one everyday.:)

WRGADog
February 3, 2013, 09:33 PM
Great gun for carry, but absolutely awful to shoot. Put ~15 357 rounds through the gun before trading for an E-Series 1911.

jimbo555
February 3, 2013, 10:00 PM
Any normal man should be able to handle 38spl. In a airweight s&w

DMK
February 5, 2013, 02:44 PM
Any normal man should be able to handle 38spl. In a airweight s&w Unless you have a physical issue that prevents you from handling the recoil, then yes anyone should be able to learn to shoot 38 specials in a lightweight snubby. But it will not be an easy gun to shoot and will take practice and maybe even some coaching if you have not shot one before.

It will take a while before one is 'proficient' with it, and anyone carrying a gun as a concealed self defense weapon should be proficient with it.

Ankeny
February 6, 2013, 12:30 AM
Any normal man should be able to handle 38spl. In a airweight s&w There is a difference between being able to "handle" a lightweight snubbie and being able to "master" the revolver. I have nothing against a j-frame, but they are indeed difficult to truly master...in comparison to other platforms. Just my opinion.

Takem406
February 6, 2013, 01:38 AM
There is a difference between being able to "handle" a lightweight snubbie and being able to "master" the revolver. I have nothing against a j-frame, but they are indeed difficult to truly master...in comparison to other platforms. Just my opinion.

Fact!

In God and Glock we Trust

David E
February 6, 2013, 02:04 AM
There is a difference between being able to "handle" a lightweight snubbie and being able to "master" the revolver. I have nothing against a j-frame, but they are indeed difficult to truly master...in comparison to other platforms. Just my opinion.

Is a snubby harder to master than some other guns? Absolutely. But is it unusually difficult, in and of itself, to master? Not really. Like anything, it requires practice and proper application of the fundamentals.

jimbo555
February 6, 2013, 12:47 PM
A normal man without physical issues who practices normally should be able to handle a airweight snub firing standard 38spl.rounds.If not work on your hand and wrist strength or replace the stocks.My model 37 airweight with s&w rubber boot grips is easier for me to shoot accurately than a ruger lcp with 380fmj.

Godsgunman
February 6, 2013, 01:09 PM
Again this wouldn't be for "any normal man". Its for a 64 yr old woman who weighs 120 with soaking wet clothes and shoes on.

BSA1
February 6, 2013, 03:19 PM
I posted a similar question looking for a handgun for my wife who has weak wrists and is recoil sensitive. Most of the suggestion were for a semi-automatic which my wife cannot operate the slide. Sadly I closed the thread when I was called a liar and other name calling.

Since that time I have been looking for a SD gun for her. Then the other day I saw a video on Gunblast.com of side by side comparison of shooting the Ruger LCR in 38 Spl vs 22 Mag. The 22 Mag was much more controllable so much that my non-gun wife said she liked it. The men-o-meno on THE are going to howl about using the 22 Mag for SD but see if you are not impressed after watching the video.

David E
February 6, 2013, 04:20 PM
I saw a video on Gunblast.com of side by side comparison of shooting the Ruger LCR in 38 Spl vs 22 Mag. The 22 Mag was much more controllable so much that my non-gun wife said she liked it.


I would've suggested a .22 semi-auto, but if it works, that's what counts.

Any gun beats no gun. I'd much rather someone be armed with a .22 they're competent with than any other gun they're afraid of.

Sergei Mosin
February 7, 2013, 07:05 PM
If a rimfire is the only option, a revolver is better than an automatic. When (not if) a rimfire cartridge fails to ignite, the revolver shooter can get back into action by pulling the trigger again. The automatic shooter has to go through the tap, rack, bang clearance drill.

David E
February 7, 2013, 10:01 PM
If a rimfire is the only option, a revolver is better than an automatic.

If someone's best option is a rimfire, that usually means there's a physical
limitation. I looked at the Ruger LCR in .22 magnum today and tried the trigger pull. My MIL wouldn't be able to pull it. If she could, there's no telling where the shot would go.

Contrast that with the easy pull of a Ruger Standard .22 semi-auto. She can work the bolt easily, wipe the safety off effortlessly and can dump the magazine into the center of any badguy foolish enough to attack her.

As long as premium ammo is used (and I regard CCI Mini-Mags and Stingers as premium) failures to fire in a clean, well maintained gun are exceedingly rare. In the 1000's of CCI rounds I've fired, I can't recall any failure to fire. Bulk pack, that's another matter entirely. Which is why I don't use bulk .22 ammo when it matters.

Old Fuff
February 7, 2013, 10:46 PM
If you are going to carry the Ruger .22 Standard Pistol or any variant thereof, with a loaded chamber, keep in mind that there is no safety ledge or notch on the hammer face to catch the hammer if it follows down. That, and the manual safety that blocks the sear is a press-punch stamping. I consider these pistols to b an excellent choice for sport shooting of all kinds, but if they are to be carried it is wise to do so with the chamber empty. :uhoh:

David E
February 8, 2013, 12:43 AM
Having fired 1000's and 1000's of rounds without incident and never having heard of an issue of the type mentioned, save for idle speculation of what maybe possibly could happen, but no specific instances cited, I'd have no trouble carrying a Ruger .22 pistol with the chamber loaded.

Old Fuff
February 8, 2013, 11:52 AM
Many people have fired thousands of rounds through Ruger .22 pistols with no problems, but the issue here is how safe are they to carry with the chamber loaded. My point was to warn users that if - for any reason - the hammer should fall there is nothing to stop it, and the firing pin is not blocked or locked by any mechanical safety or device. If you chamber a round there is no way to lower the hammer from the full-cock position.

A decision on how to carry any handgun is up to the user, and anyone can do what ever they want to. However such decisions are best made from an informed perspective. In this instance, ignorance should not be bliss.

303tom
February 8, 2013, 12:32 PM
Here is my favorite, hard to get much lighter & 9 rounds too...............

David E
February 8, 2013, 08:37 PM
Many people have fired thousands of rounds through Ruger .22 pistols with no problems, but the issue here is how safe are they to carry with the chamber loaded. My point was to warn users that if - for any reason - the hammer should fall there is nothing to stop it, and the firing pin is not blocked or locked by any mechanical safety or device. If you chamber a round there is no way to lower the hammer from the full-cock position.

A decision on how to carry any handgun is up to the user, and anyone can do what ever they want to. However such decisions are best made from an informed perspective. In this instance, ignorance should not be bliss.

Your assertion that it's unsafe is curious. The safety positively locks the sear. You cite that it's a stamped out part and therefore incapable of safely performing the task it was specifically designed to do. The Glock has several key fire control parts that are "stamped sheet metal," but no concerns about them are raised.

The M1A/M14 utilizes a "stamped sheet metal" part that is the safety, that again, presents no problems, even tho you can't lower the hammer.

You cite the absence of a 1/2 cock notch means its therefore unsafe to carry chamber loaded, but I bet you and 10's of 1000's of other people carry a shotgun with the chamber loaded while hunting, with the safety applied that merely prevents the trigger from moving. Many, if not 99% of them, have no 1/2 cock notch, and you can't lower the hammer, either.

If you have an actual, specific example of the Ruger safety failing, I'd love to read about it.

Old Fuff
February 8, 2013, 09:32 PM
Having posted a warning and an explanation, I have no desire to belabor the point. I will again point out:

A decision on how to carry any handgun is up to the user, and anyone can do what ever they want to. However such decisions are best made from an informed perspective. In this instance, ignorance should not be bliss.

Now I believe this thread is supposed to be about revolvers...

1858
February 8, 2013, 10:02 PM
The worst snubby I've ever shot; my Ruger Alaskan in .454 and it's not light.


Seriously? I find the Alaskan a joy to shoot even with hot/heavy loads.

David E
February 8, 2013, 10:53 PM
Having posted a warning and an explanation, I have no desire to belabor the point. I will again point out:.....

You don't want to belabor the point, then do!

Fuff, I love ya, man, but I sure can't see any pertinence in your last few posts.

Getting back on topic, I shot two .410 revolvers today, an Ultra-Lite Judge 3" and a stainless Public Defender 2" snub for a review for a radio segment.

One thing we've started to do is hit the 100 yd steel target. We've made hits with everything so far, including sightless .22 and .25 pocket guns.

These guns were the first ones we couldn't hit with. One shot was 10 feet left, the next 4 feet right hitting low at 80 yds.

Long story short, we determined that for an anti-carjacking gun or for snakes, they're great. For an all around defense gun, not so much.

Old Fuff
February 8, 2013, 11:00 PM
Long story short, we determined that for an anti-carjacking gun or for snakes, they're great. For an all around defense gun, not so much.

Then we agree on something... :D:

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