6.5 x 55 Swede


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sdj
January 29, 2013, 06:00 PM
I was considering obtaining a bolt action 6.5 x 55 Swede for longer distance target work. I would appreciate any input and insights that folks here on the THR might have. At first I'll be purchasing factory ammo, of which Federal makes a couple strains of match ammo.

Any likes, dis-likes or gotchas with the 6.5 x 55?

Thanks in advance.

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USSR
January 29, 2013, 06:09 PM
Great cartridge, but factory ammo is downloaded so as to be safe for old pre-98 Swedish Mausers, and Norwegian Krags that are still out there. Now, if you are talking about a commercial action and you reload, you are talking only 25.5MOA from a 100 yard zero to 1k. I shot in 1000 yard competition for many years with a custom built 6.5x55.

Don

RPRNY
January 29, 2013, 06:23 PM
My favorite cartridge and rifle. I particularly like the old 160 gr RN in my Swedish Mauser with its 1:7.9 twist rate. Be aware that several manufacturers use a 1:9 twist rate and some of them seem to struggle to stabilize even 140 gr VLD type bullets.

As per above, US manufactured factory ammo is anemic and doesn't do justice to the cartridge. Handloading will make this cartridge shine.

Also keep in mind that as much as the Swede is beloved, its more modern cousins are very good, from the later coming 6.5 Creedmoor to the .260 Rem. If not looking to shoot bigger than 140 gr bullets, you may find rifles in 6.5 Creedmoor or .260 Rem more available and economical. Having said that a Sako 85 Bavarian is my lottery win rifle. I don't know if any of the "new" Model 70s are done in either cartridge, but that would be interesting, while a Savage 11/111 with good glass could be done for @ $1000.

I love my Swede, but the .260 is just as good for 140 grs.

Steel Horse Rider
January 29, 2013, 06:38 PM
I have an early 1940's Swedish Mauser manufactured by Husqvarna that probably has the smoothest action I have ever used. It is a gun that is far more accurate than the shooter. I also build my own loads for it but I am at work and do not remember the specifics.

cal30_sniper
January 29, 2013, 06:53 PM
For hunting of large varmints and deer to elk sized game, I'd say you'd be hard pressed to find a better rifle than a Swede Mauser. They are light, easy to carry, and sufficiently powerful to hunt just about anything inside of a couple of hundred yards. I've got three, a military correct condition M96, a sporterized M94 carbine, and a sporterized M96 rifle with a cut-down 20" barrel. The M94 is a light, handy, iron sight rifle that I like to swing over my shoulder when I'm going places. The M96 sporter I use is set up for hunting bobcats and coyotes with 85 grn HP bullets. It will function equally well on deer sized game and up with 140grn or 160grn bullets.

That said, if you're looking for a long distance precision rifle, you might be better off with another setup. I'm not saying the Swede Mauser won't do it, it will just be easier cheaper with other calibers (6.5-06 comes to mind if you're set on the .264 bore diameter, as does 6.5-284). If you're set on the 6.5x55 cartridge for long range work, do yourself a favor and get one built on a M98 Mauser or a modern sporting rifle. Then you can safely load the 6.5x55 to modern pressure potentials. Most of the 96 Mausers out there are quite capable of handling even stout pressures, at least for a short while. The problem comes in with longevity and factor of safety. The M96 action is not designed to handle escaping gas well at all. When you're playing with increased pressures to squeeze that extra velocity out for long range shooting, this can be a problem. If you screw up the reloading process you will be much more likely to pay for the mistake with your life or serious injury than if you're using a M98 Mauser or modern action with better gas handling abilities. There's also no telling what the metallurgical condition of the rifle is, or what abuse it's suffered in it's 100+ years of existence.

That's the long and short of the swede in my experience. An awesome cartridge and rifle as long as you respect its limits. If you want a hotrod, look elsewhere.

Also, ammunition loaded to European pressure specs is commonly available through Prvi Partizan. It, along with Norma, Sellier and Bellot, and Lapua loadings are noticeably hotter than their American counterparts.

Coltdriver
January 29, 2013, 08:11 PM
I have had both a Swedish M38 and a CZ in 6.5X55. I now have a Steyr in a modern receiver in 6.5X54. Different cartridge but I am able to safely load it to 6.5X55 specs.

The chamber that is cut for a Swedish 6.5X55 is usually relatively long throated in order to let you shoot 160 grain bullets. So you have to get one that has the rate of twist for the 160 grain bullets which would be 1 in 8.

If you get less twist you just get a long throated rifle that will only shoot smaller bullets. I had my CZ rechambered with a custom reamer and it would shoot 130 grain bullets very accurately.

That said the 160 grainers will sail like missiles and remain stable a long way out making pretty accurate long distance shooting possible. I don't think any other bullet matches or exceeds the sectional density of a 160 grain 6.5 bullet.

I'd go with a modern receiver and double check the twist to make sure it was 1 in 8.

Hokkmike
January 29, 2013, 09:03 PM
I have hunted with and played around with Swedes for 35 years now. I have shot the Swede in the M-38, M-96, Winchester Featherlight, Winchester Sporter, and Sako Finnlight. All have been accurate.

The range, ballistics, energy, sectional density, recoil, and little noise make it a most ideal deer and target round.

Norma ammo being expensive the next best for me has been the Winchester Super X in the Silver box. I load my own with a ballistic tip and IMR 9350 powder that can be sighted in on a postage stamp.

The ONLY cons I can think of are that this ammo is not readily available at big box stores and the long case requires a large action hence longer pull of the bolt.

It is, for my money, as close to ideal as you can get. I am also a fan of, not surprisingly, the .260, 7mm08, .257 Roberts, and 7x57.

cal30_sniper
January 29, 2013, 09:28 PM
That said the 160 grainers will sail like missiles and remain stable a long way out making pretty accurate long distance shooting possible. I don't think any other bullet matches or exceeds the sectional density of a 160 grain 6.5 bullet.

I would imagine that if you were shooting at a thousand yards, you're going to be grabbing something in the range of a 107-142grn hollow point boat tail Matchking. The only 160 grn bullets I know of for the 6.5mm are the Hornady roundnose and the Woodleigh protected point. Neither of those have the BC of the 107-142 grn bullets (in fact, the Hornady roundnose 160grn has a terrible BC of .283). A worse BC with a slower muzzle velocity is definitely not good for long range performance. Using some rough max load data and a quick calculation, the 107-142 grn bullets with a 500 yd zero would have a drop at 1000 yards of roughly 20-22 MOA, with the 123 grn slightly edging out the other two for least drop. In comparison, the Woodleigh would have 29MOA of drop, and the Hornady an awful 51MOA of drop. If you're shooting for distance, the middle weights are going to be where you're at. If you're hunting, that might be a different story.

303tom
January 29, 2013, 10:17 PM
The 6.5 Swede Rules.................

The_Armed_Therapist
January 29, 2013, 10:24 PM
It should be at an advantage over similar cartridges, such as the .260, 6.5 creedmoor, .25-06, etc... However, like others have mentioned, the available factory ammo is down-loaded. It's a little disappointing, but it still performs well enough for what you'd like it to do. If you eventually reload your own, you'll have one of the most superior rounds available for what you want.

NWcityguy2
January 29, 2013, 10:45 PM
European ammo is loaded warmer that American ammo. I have a Howa 1500 which I don't recommend to people because it is ridiculously bullet picky and there are many online reports of other people having accuracy problems with them as well.

Personally I think the idea of buying Federal ammo for now and reloading later is not the best course of action. Federal 6.5x55mm ammo is weak, expensive and the brass will wear out fast because one, federal brass is soft and just does across a variety of rifle calibers, and two because American made 6.5x55 brass isn't true to spec. It is undersized and will stretch excessively around the base. See the attached picture in this thread. http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=692864

If you are going to go the 6.5x55mm route, avoid the Howa and avoid American loaded ammo. If you want to shoot some factory ammo to build up a supply of brass go with PPU, Wolf Gold (which I believe to be re-badged PPU) or S&B. Or just buy some Lapua or Norma brass from the get go.

If I was getting back into the 6.5mm rifle class I'd look long and hard at the 6.5 Creedmore. Hornady makes a couple real sweet target loads for it and it is a barrel swap away from converting to the AR10 platform. The 6.5x55mm has no problem generating more velocity with a 140gr bullet, but you will have to go over max load when reloading.

Gunnerboy
January 29, 2013, 10:48 PM
6.5 swede.... The last of Ancient Norse wizardry and black magic rolled up into a cartridge that out performs the 308 at 1000m.

cal30_sniper
January 30, 2013, 12:00 AM
Absolutely correct info on the American brass. I made the mistake of picking up a box of Remington brass in 6.5x55 for my first reloading attempt. It is defintely made off of the smaller 7x57/8x57/30-06/308 case head. The swede case head and body is significantly larger, and bulging is present even after the first firing.

I highly recommend Prvi Partizan ammo. For ~$14 a box, it can't be beat. Very accurate stuff. I ordered up 200 rounds right after they started importing it. It shoots good, and the brass is top notch. I also prefer their loading for 7x57, which I shoot a lot of as well.

ExAgoradzo
January 30, 2013, 12:48 AM
Thanks for the tip on the American ammo. I knew I'd get something out of this thread!
Greg

Water-Man
January 30, 2013, 01:27 AM
I've got a Tikka T3 in 6.5x55 SE. A great combination.

The Tikka has a 1 in 8 twist rate and can handle the heavier loads.

I like Norma and Lapua brass best.

106rr
January 30, 2013, 02:34 AM
I have a Steyr SBS in 6.5x55 with a Minox 3x9x40. It is a superb rifle cartridge combo. The most accurate ammo in mine has been Federal 140 gr but Remington 140 gr Corelokt is also great. I think a modern action is best and safest to shoot. When loaded to modern pressure levels it is a much different cartridge with a flat trajectory and great accuracy with low recoil.

T.R.
January 30, 2013, 09:04 AM
My wife hunts with a custom Browning in 6.5mm Swede. It's a very accurate rifle with moderate recoil. But if I could do it over again, I'd have bought her a 270 and had the muzzle MagnaPorted. Cost would be half but same accuracy and recoil.

TR

jimbeaux82
January 30, 2013, 09:20 AM
I have a CZ 550FS in 6.5x55 and it is a great rifle. All of the comments about American ammo being anemic are true, but I have not seen any problems reloading American produced brass at all. I load 140gr bullets up to 2800 fps without any pressure signs in mine using Rem or Fed brass. PPU is even more anemic than American ammo but S&B is loaded full power and that is what I would shoot if I did not reload.

Greenmachin3
January 30, 2013, 09:39 AM
I have only ever fired a 6.5 swede on two occasions. One was sighting in my father's new Steyr Mannlicher Classic, the other was taking an elk up near Flagstaff AZ with it. The 6.5 Swede is one slippery round. Up to about 500 yards the .308 still has more energy, but because of how slippery the 6.5 bullet is, it actually has better energy and terminal ballistics past 600-700 yards. Up to 200 yards it feels like a laser beam. I would say .270 flat. Fantastic round. Never hand loaded though.

303tom
January 30, 2013, 11:15 AM
Numbers matching Husqvarna M96................

sdj
January 30, 2013, 07:45 PM
Thanks to all who chimed in! Lots of information in this thread. Given that I'm looking for long distance paper punching, it would appear I'm better off with another caliber. I was trying to get into a caliber other than .308 (just for the experience of something different more than than anything else). I'm restricted (for now) to Factory ammo only, looks like .308 is the way to go, for now.


Thanks for pointing out the Hornady site:

http://www.hornady.com/store/308-Win-178-gr-BTHP-Superformance-Match/

viking499
January 30, 2013, 09:46 PM
Are you saying you are limited because you don't reload?

sdj
January 30, 2013, 10:13 PM
Viking: yes, that is correct; simply do not have the time to reload. :(

Paul7
January 30, 2013, 10:18 PM
The Privi 6.5x55 ammo is only about $13 a box.

I just got a Sako 85 Finnlight in this caliber, can't wait to shoot it. My new pig, Barbary Sheep, pronghorn, and cow elk round.

NWcityguy2
January 31, 2013, 12:52 AM
Here is something to think about. If you are planning to...

-Buy a rifle traditionally associated with hunting
-Not compete in any organized long distance shooting competitions
-Want to expand what you are capable of as an individual for the sake of becoming a better shot...

I suggest you also look at .243 Winchester, 270 Win and 30-06. All are affordable, everyone makes rifles and ammo for them and all can give you excellent accuracy. Don't get me wrong, 308 Winchester is a great caliber for those who don't reload. Maybe in a few months you will be able to find some ammo for it as well. Buying a slightly different caliber will distance yourself from the large group of people who go crazy for ammo every so often. Sometimes people latch on to the idea that they need to shoot a caliber that is associated with competition (or police/military/tactical) so they can shoot "match ammo" without realizing that there might be no practical benefit the way they are going to do it. Just a thought.

Paul7
January 31, 2013, 09:36 AM
Here is something to think about. If you are planning to...

-Buy a rifle traditionally associated with hunting
-Not compete in any organized long distance shooting competitions
-Want to expand what you are capable of as an individual for the sake of becoming a better shot...

I suggest you also look at .243 Winchester, 270 Win and 30-06. All are affordable, everyone makes rifles and ammo for them and all can give you excellent accuracy. Don't get me wrong, 308 Winchester is a great caliber for those who don't reload. Maybe in a few months you will be able to find some ammo for it as well. Buying a slightly different caliber will distance yourself from the large group of people who go crazy for ammo every so often. Sometimes people latch on to the idea that they need to shoot a caliber that is associated with competition (or police/military/tactical) so they can shoot "match ammo" without realizing that there might be no practical benefit the way they are going to do it. Just a thought.
IMHO the Swede offers advantages over the calibers you mentioned. More power than the .243, and less recoil and noise than the .270 and .30-'06. About as good a round as the .308, but again with less blast and recoil. Even during this current ammo panic, I've had no problem finding 6.5x55 ammo, certainly a round 'traditionally associated with hunting'.

TheGrimReaper
January 31, 2013, 12:02 PM
I love my tikka 6.5x55 SE. Great rifle and awsome round!!!

sdj
January 31, 2013, 07:46 PM
Again, thanks to all who chimed in. Many of you insightfully saw that I am looking to stay away from .223/.308, as it seems we're in a period where demand for both .223/5.56 and .308 is on the rise. The .270, .260, .243 and .30-06 are certainly on all the list, but I am really looking to reduce recoil, blast, etc. I've started to look at rifles and am gravitating towards the Tikka T3 Varmint. If 6.5 X 55 Swede is produced at decreased pressures in the U.S., that's not important to me at this phase, as I'll be shooting under 500 yards, for starters. Here's a link to the Hornady site for 6.5 X 55:

http://www.hornady.com/store/6.5X55/

Here's rifle under consideration: http://www.tikka.fi/t3models.php?varmint

Best,

SDJ

jrdolall
January 31, 2013, 07:57 PM
I bought a 1918 Swede last year as my first venture into the 6.5x55 round and have been very pleased. I have fired the gun perhaps 50 times using a variety of ammo from the Prvi Partian to the Nosler Trophy Grade and everything I have tried has had acceptable accuracy out to 150 yards which is as far as I ever shoot. I have a box of the Nosler Accubond in 140 grain that I got from Grafs a few weeks ago and will shoot some this weekend. It will strictly be a deer rifle for me and my family. I like it because of the minimal recoil and light weight. I do not reload so the american made ammo works fine for me. As I slay some animals with it I will get a better idea of the differetn ammo capabilities.

viking499
January 31, 2013, 08:08 PM
Sdj, that is a SWEET rifle. But I don't think it is available in the US.

But, this one is.......

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=328034651

Available in either 20" or 24".

Tikka's are great rifles in the 6.5x55. I have 2 of them. And a CZ 6.5. All are good, but, the Tikka's get more outdoor time.:D

RPRNY
January 31, 2013, 09:06 PM
Or save quite a bit and pick up one of the Kimber of Oregon Sporters. They did a decent job. 1:8 twist and very likely a good barrel. A little pricey for a sporter, but they have the scope safety, good stocks, and were, I believe, glass bedded. I don't know if they did anything with the triggers.

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=327602472

Paul7
February 1, 2013, 08:53 PM
Sdj, that is a SWEET rifle. But I don't think it is available in the US.

But, this one is.......

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=328034651

Available in either 20" or 24".

Tikka's are great rifles in the 6.5x55. I have 2 of them. And a CZ 6.5. All are good, but, the Tikka's get more outdoor time.:D
You have to wonder what ever possessed Tikka/Beretta to think this beast would sell but the Tikka T3 Light in 6.5x55 would not.

viking499
February 1, 2013, 09:30 PM
I bet the T3 would outsell it 1000 to 1...........

NuclearMeltdown
February 1, 2013, 11:23 PM
I've been really wanting a commercial 6.5x55 bolt action recently. Preferably with a wood stock. I've been hoping to find one of these in used condition locally:

Tikka T3 Hunter
Sako 85 Bavarian/Carbine
CZ 550 FS or American
Winchester 70 Classic Featherweight

...but I've only ever seen one of these in 6.5x55 in person. Maybe they just aren't around in central PA.

The only new one I can find locally is the Sako, but I don't have two grand laying around.

This is my favorite cartridge. My Swedish Mausers are a joy to shoot.

303tom
February 2, 2013, 12:31 AM
This is a beautiful rifle, I even put a bid in on it.................
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewItem.aspx?Item=328173790

Kachok
February 2, 2013, 06:26 AM
I am a HUGE fan of the 6.5x55 cartridge, I have to agree with the others that the Tikka T3 in 6.5x55 is a superb rifle, mine is the most accurate centerfire I have ever shot (and I have shot ALOT) Light recoil, fantastic ballistics, and simply dang accurate. I find it funny that 120+ years later we are still trying to copy perfection, neither the 6.5 Creedmore, 260 Rem, or 6.5x47 Lapua will do anything the Sweed has not been doing for over a century. All that said if you don't have time to reload and you want to shoot very long distances you might want to look at one of it's modern ballistic twins since they are more readily available with full powder match ammo. The Sweed is a handloaders cartridge without a doubt. The Creedmore was made to match the full power Sweed and it is my second choice of the bunch, it was intended to be marketed to the long range shooting crowd pre-fit with A-Max bullets.
Never tried the Federal Match ammo, but mine shoots el-cheapo $13 a box Prvi and Winchester SP under an inch with boring regularity.
BTW Prvi brass is some REALLY good stuff if you ever decide to handload, thick as syrup and hard as hell but it is really well made and lasts FOREVER! I am still using the same 100 Prvi brass I got when I bought my rifle years ago, still not one cracked neck or loose primer pocket I have lost count of how many firings.

Jason_W
February 2, 2013, 07:54 AM
It's cool this thread popped up as the 6.5 swede is one of the many rounds I'm going back and forth on as I start planning to rebuild my gun collection.

I used to have a sporterized M38 I sold during a bout of youthful stupidity.

Sorry if this counts a thread-jacking, but how do you know a good military surplus swede when you see one and is there a way to mount a scope without drilling into the gun?

Paul7
February 2, 2013, 11:16 AM
I've been really wanting a commercial 6.5x55 bolt action recently. Preferably with a wood stock. I've been hoping to find one of these in used condition locally:

Tikka T3 Hunter
Sako 85 Bavarian/Carbine
CZ 550 FS or American
Winchester 70 Classic Featherweight

...but I've only ever seen one of these in 6.5x55 in person. Maybe they just aren't around in central PA.

The only new one I can find locally is the Sako, but I don't have two grand laying around.

This is my favorite cartridge. My Swedish Mausers are a joy to shoot.
I just bought a Sako 85 Finnlight in 6.5 from Cove Creek Outfitters in your state, $1,349. Not cheap, but a lot less than two grand and a better rifle than the T3 anyway. I hear Sako holds their value well.

Hokkmike
February 2, 2013, 11:18 AM
Jason W, Matching numbers and a good old fashioned inspection. Don't do scopes on old military, sorry......

I have found the SWEETEST SWEDE I have ever seen; it is an M-96. If My guitar sells before it does then it is mine.

With my luck though.......................

sdj
February 2, 2013, 12:34 PM
Sako 85 Finnlight in 6.5

:)

I think my search has just ended. :-)

Thanks for passing that on; that'll do, nicely.

CB900F
February 2, 2013, 03:43 PM
Fella's;

Several years ago I bought my son a 6.5 Swede for his birthday present. I reloaded for it, found out what it could do, and got the itch to get one for myself. Only one hitch in that idea though, I shoot from the left shoulder, and it's extremely hard to find an LHB in 6.5 Swede. Not impossible, Mauser G3 and Blaser are imported, plus there are a very few M-S guns in the country. But by the time you pay that premium you might as well build a custom gun. Which is what I did.

I had the barrel reamed for Winchester brass, 140 gr Sierra Gameking bullet. The best three-shot group I've ever gotten is a .261" at 100 yards, but it'll consistently shoot sub-.500". This is a hunting gun with a 20" barrel, not a bench gun. The scope is a Zeiss Conquest 3.5-10X mil-dot, number 43 reticle.

I'm a happy camper.

900F

vaupet
February 3, 2013, 08:24 AM
@ cb : pictures please

I have a unique alpine tpg1 in 6.5x55 on order, should be delivered around may
I plan to equip it with Smidt & Bender pm II 3-20 x 50 with a p4f reticle

I choose 6.5x55 because the longest range in Belgium is 600 meters so the 6.5 will do fine, and 300 wm or heavier aren't aloud at 75% of the shooting ranges.

The caliber is very available at the same price as 308, 7.5, 30-30 etc

ExAgoradzo
February 3, 2013, 10:31 AM
If you order the Sako order rings/bases immediately, otherwise you'll have the most beautiful gun in your safe for a month and you can't shoot it!!! It is aggravating! Ask me, I know!!!
Greg

303tom
February 3, 2013, 12:26 PM
It's cool this thread popped up as the 6.5 swede is one of the many rounds I'm going back and forth on as I start planning to rebuild my gun collection.

I used to have a sporterized M38 I sold during a bout of youthful stupidity.

Sorry if this counts a thread-jacking, but how do you know a good military surplus swede when you see one and is there a way to mount a scope without drilling into the gun?
Look at post # 20, that is a good military surplus swede..............

CB900F
February 3, 2013, 12:28 PM
Vaupet;

I'd love to, the pics have been taken, they're in the computer, but transferring them to a website remains beyond the ability of the programmers to make it easy enough for me to do. In other words, since the process is not absolutely self-evident, I'm waiting on that stupendous pool of mental ability to get it to the point that I don't have to jump through esoteric hoops to do so. Or, to put it another way, my admiration for programmers knows some bounds.

900F

pharmdon
February 6, 2013, 02:12 PM
Been recreationally shooting for years, but still a hunting novice when I did alot of reading and picked up a used Steyr Mountain rifle chambered in 6.5x55 this past year before a hunting trip. I have been very pleased with my choice. Accurate, easy shooter, with enough power to do whatever I need it to here in the Southeast. Was able to bag a whitetail, boar and a bobcat with the Swede. Love this round.http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/x420/pharmdon/F4452CB5-DB0D-41AE-8734-5BD63FCB9D1D-92505-000070723E12C592.jpg

Hokkmike
February 6, 2013, 07:42 PM
ExAgoradzo - I used Leupold rings on my Finnlight with excellent results.....

Paul7
February 6, 2013, 09:14 PM
Been recreationally shooting for years, but still a hunting novice when I did alot of reading and picked up a used Steyr Mountain rifle chambered in 6.5x55 this past year before a hunting trip. I have been very pleased with my choice. Accurate, easy shooter, with enough power to do whatever I need it to here in the Southeast. Was able to bag a whitetail, boar and a bobcat with the Swede. Love this round.http://i1180.photobucket.com/albums/x420/pharmdon/F4452CB5-DB0D-41AE-8734-5BD63FCB9D1D-92505-000070723E12C592.jpg
Nice pig, how much did he weigh and how did he react when the 6.5 hit him?

highpower
February 6, 2013, 09:24 PM
I regularly shoot my 6.5X55 Swede at longer ranges. Not for target shooting or hunting, but rather to see if I can hit things that are waay out there.

The old girl was made in 1917 and still shoots great.
http://highpower.smugmug.com/Firearms/Swedish-M96/i-QnZRt4j/0/XL/IMG_1546-XL.jpg

6.5swede
February 9, 2013, 02:24 PM
Not much to add based on the good advice you've received on the Swede. It's a very well balanced cartridge and perfect for the majority of hunting that I do which is deer, hogs, predators in the southeast where 98% of shots are <200yds. Good advice on the american ammo except the Nosler trophy Grade 140gr NAB which is loaded hotter and has performed well for me. Norma and Lapua make/made good ammo and the brass is top notch. Norma used to load a 140gr nosler partition, 120gr Ballistic tip, and 156gr Oryx which were all excellent factory fodder options for the swede. I scored a few cases when they went on close out. It's hard to find a bad 6.5mm hunting bullet. You'll really enjoy this cartridge! I'm currently up to 6 rifles in either 6.5x55 or 260. Kinda partial to Sako, Tikka, and Winchester.

6.5swede
February 9, 2013, 02:59 PM
I'll post a few representative 3 shot groups at 100yds just to give you an idea of how accurate these 6.5's can be. The first pic from top to bottom is a T3 (BLK) shooting 140gr NAB's, 2nd is a T3 (GRY) shooting 140gr NBT's, 3rd T3 (wood/SS) shooting 120gr NBT's, and 4th a Sako 85 260 shooting 120gr TTSX's. The other 2 are Win 70's shooting 140gr NPT's or 125 gr NPT's.

Kachok
February 9, 2013, 03:22 PM
It won't let me repost the picture but my little featherweight 6.5x55 is capable of some impressive one hole groups even with budget hunting bullets :) I love it when my spotter thinks I only hit the target once! Tried a few "match" loads but my Tikka like regular ol Hornady SSTs and Serria Game Kings. If you need more accuracy then this you are just doing it wrong.
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=663791&highlight=awsome+6.5x55+load

6.5swede
February 9, 2013, 05:09 PM
Nice Shooting Kachok. Gotta love the 6.5's!

viking499
February 9, 2013, 06:55 PM
Reckon the slower twist of the featherweight has anything to do with that? It is a hair slower than the Tikka.

ExAgoradzo
February 10, 2013, 10:06 AM
Hockmike
Thanks for the tip. My problem was the bases. I just got them in yesterday and have my scope 'in', but I haven't bore sighted it yet. Can't wait to shoot it. Pics on the Sako 6.5x55 thread.
Love reading this thread though!
SDJ
you are going to have one great rifle! I hope we both enjoy it!
Greg

pharmdon
April 1, 2013, 03:22 PM
Nice pig, how much did he weigh and how did he react when the 6.5 hit him?
weighed in at just above 180 lbs. Hit it from around 120 yards and it immediately darted into thick brush. I was kinda worried I might have pulled my shot and missed. Waited about 30 minutes then went to investigate. Zero blood trail (tough hide) but I found it ten yards away in the brush dead. Single entry wound to heart/lung. No exit.

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