Gun appraisals


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Madison Monson
January 29, 2013, 06:22 PM
I am a new member who found this forum by attempting to do some internet research on 3 guns that I inherited from my father. I don't know if they are worth selling at auction, or if they are mass produced, inexpensive guns.

Does anyone know the approximate value of the following guns:

*Harrington & Richardson 28 gauge hand gun Serial #1132
*1905 32-20 Savage Sporter rifle Serial #68430, patented Nov 28, 1905 (first patent)
*Remington Model 31 12 gauge shotgun serial #66890 with full choke barrel #55990

Thank you for any and all assistance.

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ApacheCoTodd
January 29, 2013, 07:47 PM
Welcome and have patience with these not particularly common firearms.

Do you have photos to identify the particular firearms as well as giving an idea as to condition?

hso
January 29, 2013, 08:38 PM
Gotta have detailed pictures to give anything other than a + 100% range.

Jim Watson
January 29, 2013, 09:23 PM
I won't guess dollar values but the Savage Sporter and Model 31 are nice finds.

A H&R Handy Gun, 28 ga shot pistol is a fascinating find, very scarce, and quite valuable.
IF REGISTERED.
If not, it is illegal to possess.
You need expert legal advice on what to do with this one.

Madison Monson
January 29, 2013, 10:46 PM
I can get photos. They are currently at my parent's house.
Jim - I think you are correct about the unregistered handgun as my mother thought that might be the case. My father found it among his father's belongings when he died. The story is that my grandfather who was a Colonel in the Army obtained it at a POW camp, but no one knows for sure and no one is alive to verify the information.

Chevelle SS
January 29, 2013, 11:20 PM
It's not an unregistered handgun; it is an unregistered NFA firearm.

Madison Monson
January 29, 2013, 11:28 PM
Sorry - as you can probably tell, I know nothing about guns, so please excuse my ignorance and my incorrect terminology. What is NFA?

Chevelle SS
January 29, 2013, 11:32 PM
National Firearms Act from 1934. It restricts and requires registration of some guns like short barrel shotguns and machine guns. A Handy gun would have to be registered. As stated before, seek some professional legal advice regarding it.

Madison Monson
January 29, 2013, 11:35 PM
Thank you for the clarification. I just found out about this gun a couple of months ago. It makes my mother nervous. I have no idea what to do with it, I certainly don't want to do anything illegal.

Arp32
January 29, 2013, 11:38 PM
Don't trust the Internet, find a lawyer that specializes in NFA for a consultation. Serious business.

Madison Monson
January 29, 2013, 11:44 PM
I'm thinking it might be easier to give it to my cousin and let him deal with it, or just bury it in the back yard. :banghead:

Chevelle SS
January 29, 2013, 11:46 PM
Before you bury it cut it up with a torch.

tarosean
January 30, 2013, 02:00 AM
Before advising him to chop it up it.. Might be worthwhile to find out if he is located in the United States first???

paintballdude902
January 30, 2013, 03:39 AM
before it gets cut up or something silly you should determine if it is a legal firearm. its possible that the taxes were paid on it and it is a legal weapon, in which case you can keep it (after jumping through some hoops), turn it into the ATF/cops, or jump through some hoops and then sell it. IIRC after death an NFA weapon can be transfered to a dealer and he can put it on consignment or purchase it himself. edit: this is a negative looked it up



from the ATFs site.

If there are unregistered NFA firearms in the estate, these firearms are contraband and cannot be registered by the estate. The executor of the estate should contact the local ATF office to arrange for the abandonment of the unregistered firearms.

For registered NFA firearms in the estate, the executor should take action as soon as possible to arrange for the proper registration of the firearms. Possession of an NFA firearm not registered to the possessor is a violation of Federal law and the firearm is subject to seizure and forfeiture. However, we do allow the executor a reasonable time to arrange for the transfer of the registered firearms in a decedentís estate. This generally should be done before probate is closed.

It is the responsibility of the executor of the estate to maintain custody and control of the firearms and to transfer the firearms registered to the decedent. The firearms may not be transferred to another party, such as a firearms licensee, for consignment or safekeeping. This would be a transfer subject to the requirements of the NFA. The licensee may assist the executor by identifying purchasers and acting as a broker.

The firearms may be transferred on a tax-exempt basis to a lawful heir. The executor would apply on ATF Form 5, Application for Tax Exempt Transfer and Registration of a Firearm, for a tax-exempt transfer to a lawful heir. A lawful heir is anyone named in the decedentís will or, in the absence of a will, anyone entitled to inherit under the laws of the State in which the decedent last resided. NFA firearms may be transferred directly interstate to a beneficiary of the estate. When a firearm is being transferred to an individual heir, his or her fingerprints on FBI Forms FD-258 must accompany the transfer application. However, if any Federal, State or local law prohibits the heir from receiving or possessing the firearm, ATF will not approve the application.If there are unregistered NFA firearms in the estate, these firearms are contraband and cannot be registered by the estate. The executor of the estate should contact the local ATF office to arrange for the abandonment of the unregistered firearms.

For registered NFA firearms in the estate, the executor should take action as soon as possible to arrange for the proper registration of the firearms. Possession of an NFA firearm not registered to the possessor is a violation of Federal law and the firearm is subject to seizure and forfeiture. However, we do allow the executor a reasonable time to arrange for the transfer of the registered firearms in a decedentís estate. This generally should be done before probate is closed.

It is the responsibility of the executor of the estate to maintain custody and control of the firearms and to transfer the firearms registered to the decedent. The firearms may not be transferred to another party, such as a firearms licensee, for consignment or safekeeping. This would be a transfer subject to the requirements of the NFA. The licensee may assist the executor by identifying purchasers and acting as a broker.

The firearms may be transferred on a tax-exempt basis to a lawful heir. The executor would apply on ATF Form 5, Application for Tax Exempt Transfer and Registration of a Firearm, for a tax-exempt transfer to a lawful heir. A lawful heir is anyone named in the decedentís will or, in the absence of a will, anyone entitled to inherit under the laws of the State in which the decedent last resided. NFA firearms may be transferred directly interstate to a beneficiary of the estate. When a firearm is being transferred to an individual heir, his or her fingerprints on FBI Forms FD-258 must accompany the transfer application. However, if any Federal, State or local law prohibits the heir from receiving or possessing the firearm, ATF will not approve the application.

http://www.atf.gov/press/releases/1999/09/090599-openletter-nfa-estate-transfers.html

outbackjak
February 4, 2013, 02:31 PM
Do not act in fear, research and understand, do not be ignorant and destroy a unknown treasure.

xxjumbojimboxx
February 7, 2013, 10:32 PM
Eek, DONT DO IT!.

Figure it out!

Dont go waiving it at poeple... Hide it very well until you can get the legal advice you need. Once you have that... Then make your decisions. After all, it is an inheritence... I would ask a police officer friend if theres anything in place to help folks who inherit thing like this. I recently saw a clip on youtube where an old lady inherited a 25000 dollar machine gun. Yes the cops confiscated it, But they also allowed her to take the avenues necisary to sell it so she wasnt out the cash.

ahandgunner2
February 18, 2013, 09:39 PM
Found this thread that shows ATF regs...seems as if you cut the barrel off (making it just a receiver and furniture) then it would be legal.

I'd rather do that than destroy the whole thing....

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?t=33171

Jim K
February 18, 2013, 10:06 PM
Be VERY careful about BATFE's wording. IF you have a REGISTERED short barrel shotgun, you have a short barrel shotgun. It can be removed from the NFRTR and the purview of the NFA by removing and destroying the barrel and then writing BATFE to advise them that the short barrel shotgun is no longer in existence as such.

BUT if you have an UNREGISTERED short-barrel shotgun, you dont have a short barrel shotgun; you have a contraband item, just like a kilo of heroin or counterfeit money, and it is already illegal to possess. Removing the barrel does not make it legal, it simply adds another crime, destroying evidence of a felony, to the charge of possessing an unregistered NFA firearm.

Do as the NFA web site says; arrange to abandon it. If you want to work through an attorney, do so, but do NOT take the advice of "experts" on a web site. They won't even be able to apologize for their bad advice because you won't have internet access in federal prison.

Jim

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