Is my 93 Spanish Mauser safe to shoot?


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CApighunter
January 31, 2013, 10:55 PM
About a year ago I was given an 1893 Spanish Mauser in 7x57 made in 1902 with a broken firing pin. This rifle has been beat to hell and sporterized so it has little monetary value to me. I found replacement firing pins for $20 online, and thought it would be just a fun gun to shoot and maybe keep it as a backup/loaner rifle for pig hunting. The bore is in fairly good shape despite to slightly eroded throat. Is there any reason this rifle may be unsafe to fire?
CApighunter

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RPRNY
January 31, 2013, 11:02 PM
No inherent reason. But if it's been beat up and neglected prior to your ownership, having it checked out by a proper gunsmith would be smart.

slicksleeve
January 31, 2013, 11:13 PM
I bought a Spanish Mauser that was marked 1925 Oviedo that had been sporterized for $85. I don't know if this is an 1893, but it is a small ring. When I shot it, the bolt would not open without hitting the bolt hard. I should have noticed the hammer marks on the bolt before I bought it, it looks like whoever had it before me would shoot it, then hammer the bolt handle open with a flat bar or something. Anyway, I pulled the barrel, and it has quite the lug setback. I don't know what I will do with it, probably just let it sit from now on as a learning experience to inspect a little closer before I buy. (I was looking for a builder action, but obviously this is not the one to use). I hope yours is better. But I went ahead and shot most of a box of Federal 140 grain 7x57mm ammo out of it, and it didn't hurt me, so if yours doesn't show any sign on the bolt handle of someone having to hammer it open, I would say go ahead and shoot it.

cal30_sniper
January 31, 2013, 11:33 PM
I bought a Spanish Mauser that was marked 1925 Oviedo that had been sporterized for $85. I don't know if this is an 1893, but it is a small ring. When I shot it, the bolt would not open without hitting the bolt hard. I should have noticed the hammer marks on the bolt before I bought it, it looks like whoever had it before me would shoot it, then hammer the bolt handle open with a flat bar or something. Anyway, I pulled the barrel, and it has quite the lug setback. I don't know what I will do with it, probably just let it sit from now on as a learning experience to inspect a little closer before I buy. (I was looking for a builder action, but obviously this is not the one to use). I hope yours is better. But I went ahead and shot most of a box of Federal 140 grain 7x57mm ammo out of it, and it didn't hurt me, so if yours doesn't show any sign on the bolt handle of someone having to hammer it open, I would say go ahead and shoot it.

Terrible advice. The method of it worked for me so it will work for you does not work very well with things that can easily blow up and kill you. In slicksleeve's case, the best thing he could possibly do is saw that receiver in half. If it really has that much lug setback, it's a timebomb waiting to go off. Leaving an action that's that bad intact to shoot is wishing ill on anyone who might inherit your collection.

The small ring mausers are awesome little guns, but there isn't many safety factors built into them for when things go wrong. Pighunter, if the rifle is in that bad of shape externally, you need to get it checked out by a reputable gunsmith. At the very least, the headspacing needs to be checked. Catastrophic failure is very unlikely, but it only takes once to get you. Better play it on the safe side.

Also, you don't hear of firing pins breaking very often on Mausers. It has an extremely stout design. Might be another sign that it's led a very hard life.

NCsmitty
February 1, 2013, 10:57 AM
At the very least, the headspacing needs to be checked. Catastrophic failure is very unlikely, but it only takes once to get you. Better play it on the safe side.

Sage advice, there's a good chance that nothing major is wrong in the original caliber, but a simple check by a knowledgeable gunsmith is the smart choice.


NCsmitty

R.W.Dale
February 1, 2013, 11:02 AM
If the gun passes inspection by a qualified gunsmith there's no reason not to shoot it.

HOWEVER I would never never EVER shoot it without wearing ANSI rated safety glasses.




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