460 S&W Magnum


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ruger1228
February 1, 2013, 08:38 PM
I just bought a used Thompson Encore pistol in the 460 S&W Magnum. It has a 15" barrel and the muzzel is ported. The price was right and I bought it because it had a Burris 3x12 32mm AO scope on it and I needed another Encore Frame/Receiver. I had planned on selling the barrel but I am re-thinking that idea.
I have never heard much about the 460 S&W Magnum caliber.
Are their any Encore owners out there who have this caliber that could give me some information on it-recoil, accuracy, etc?
Also would appreciate information on reloading this caliber? Can cast lead bullets be used without causing major leading problems in the barrel?
I have other barrels I could place on the frame/receiver and just sell the barrel for what I could get out of it.
Thanking all in advance for any information or advice you can provide.

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General Geoff
February 2, 2013, 03:04 PM
using full power loads, I think jacketed (or at the very least gas checked) bullets are the way to go. Can't say much about recoil or accuracy other than it's one of the most powerful commercially produced handgun cartridges in the world (surpassed only by the .500 S&W Magnum), and that it has a reputation for stellar accuracy and flat trajectory out of S&W revolvers chambered for it.

chris in va
February 2, 2013, 03:33 PM
According to my Lyman manual, you can also fire 454 Casull and 45 Colt ammo through it. Lead loads are shown, around 1900fps.

buck460XVR
February 2, 2013, 03:47 PM
My .460 X-Frame is scarey accurate and a hoot to shoot. It is a handloaders caliber and this is where it really shines. That said, my son had a T.C. Pro Hunter Katahdin Carbine with the 20'' barrel and we never did find a accurate load for it before he sold it. It did not have a muzzle break and without the cylinder gap, recoil was brutal with the same loads that were comfortable outta my Compensated PC Revolver. He did enjoy shooting .45 Colt outta it before he sold it tho. If you do decide to keep it and handload for it, make sure the jacketed bullets you use are appropriate for the velocity as those .45 caliber jacketed bullets intended for .45 Colt velocities may separate in the barrel at .460 velocities.

BCRider
February 4, 2013, 02:57 PM
You didn't mention what sort of use you'd be putting the barrel to.

You also would not get the variety you want from factory ammo. And who can afford to buy much of it at what they charge for .460 anyway.

So right off the bat you're looking at investing in a set of reloading dies. And if you cast your own bullets a suitable mold or two. And of course we ALL know that this ends up being a dribbling hole in the pocket book fun though it may be. And then there's the time spent trying out all the combinations. That means lots of quality range time. Not to mention the confusion and thinking that occurs if the groups are not up to expectations. That leads to more bench and range time. It all becomes a crazy circle of bench and range time until the final solutions rise to the top and you standing there grinning like the cheshire cat at some hunk o' paper that has a bunch of tightly grouped holes in it. Nope, it makes NO financial sense at all.... :D

Seriously though, if you're already up to your neck in other such projects then it may be worth selling it off to remove the temptation. On the other hand if developing loads for a new caliber and barrel like this sounds like fun then perhaps simply put it away for later. In the meantime you can slowly accumulate the dies, molds and other supplies you need to support this new caliber option. That way it doesn't seem so costly because you spread it out until one day all the bits are there waiting to be used.

For hunting power wise it's interesting to note that the muzzle energy is only a little below or matches the .444Marlin round depending on the bullet weight. And that is based on the shorter handgun barrel information from the Hornady reloading data online. With the longer Encore barrel the differences would become even less.

Oh..... I wonder if paper patching otherwise "dry" cast lead bullets might work with this and allow the faster muzzle velocities? Most of the paper patching I've read about seems related to longer style rifle bullets. It might be another interesting side path to check out.

ruger1228
February 4, 2013, 08:33 PM
You didn't mention what sort of use you'd be putting the barrel to.

You also would not get the variety you want from factory ammo. And who can afford to buy much of it at what they charge for .460 anyway.

So right off the bat you're looking at investing in a set of reloading dies. And if you cast your own bullets a suitable mold or two. And of course we ALL know that this ends up being a dribbling hole in the pocket book fun though it may be. And then there's the time spent trying out all the combinations. That means lots of quality range time. Not to mention the confusion and thinking that occurs if the groups are not up to expectations. That leads to more bench and range time. It all becomes a crazy circle of bench and range time until the final solutions rise to the top and you standing there grinning like the cheshire cat at some hunk o' paper that has a bunch of tightly grouped holes in it. Nope, it makes NO financial sense at all.... :D

Seriously though, if you're already up to your neck in other such projects then it may be worth selling it off to remove the temptation. On the other hand if developing loads for a new caliber and barrel like this sounds like fun then perhaps simply put it away for later. In the meantime you can slowly accumulate the dies, molds and other supplies you need to support this new caliber option. That way it doesn't seem so costly because you spread it out until one day all the bits are there waiting to be used.

For hunting power wise it's interesting to note that the muzzle energy is only a little below or matches the .444Marlin round depending on the bullet weight. And that is based on the shorter handgun barrel information from the Hornady reloading data online. With the longer Encore barrel the differences would become even less.

Oh..... I wonder if paper patching otherwise "dry" cast lead bullets might work with this and allow the faster muzzle velocities? Most of the paper patching I've read about seems related to longer style rifle bullets. It might be another interesting side path to check out.
BC Rider,
When I bought the Encore it came with 2 boxes of Hornady ammo. I figured I would try these on paper at the range to check accuracy, recoil, etc. With the information gained from the range, I'll make the decision of whether to invest in reloading supplies or to just sell the 460 barrel. If I do decide to keep the barrel, I will just purchase bullets for reloading. I have never had any desire to cast my own bullets even though I reload everything from .380ACP to 45/70.

NavyLCDR
February 7, 2013, 02:37 PM
Can't say much about recoil or accuracy other than it's one of the most powerful commercially produced handgun cartridges in the world (surpassed only by the .500 S&W Magnum)

Incorrect. The .460 S&W surpasses the .500 S&W in power. .460 S&W runs around 2,826 ft-lbs to 2,860 ft-lbs muzzle energy. .500 S&W runs around 2,491 ft-lbs to 2,579 ft-lbs muzzle energy. According to Buffalo Bore website ammunition information.

ruger1228
February 7, 2013, 03:21 PM
Well, I took the Encore to the range today. Wholly Craparoo. What a recoil. Still reeling from the shock waves. This is not a gun for the faint at heart. I thought my 45/70 Encore recoil was bad. Compared to the 460 S&W, the 45/70 feels like you're shooting a 22 LR.
One thing I do have to say is that this pistol is very, very accurate.
Still debating whether to keep it for deer hunting or selling or trading it for another barrel.

460Kodiak
February 7, 2013, 03:51 PM
I love my 460V (5"bbl). It is a great gun. If it were me, I'd keep it. It's great for dear, and elk out past 100 yards.

Someone posted chrono results. Out of a 22" bbl he was getting like 2900 ft/sec with the standard 200 gr Hornady load. Obviously you'd be getting less, but plenty to drop a critter for chow. Id shoot 100 yards iron sites no prob with mine........ if my eyes were better.

Crazy accurate and a hoot to shoot. It'll make a nice heirloom. Muzzle blast is a bit amazing.

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