Shim a riflescope?


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bikemutt
February 2, 2013, 12:40 PM
While mounting a certain scope to a rifle I'm in a situation where I cannot zero the crosshair to the boresight laser. I have other scopes I can zero on the rifle and, I can zero this scope on other rifles, it's just this combination that's giving me fits.

If I loosen the rear mount so that I can tilt and shift the scope, I can coerce it into a position where it can be zeroed with the turrets.

Is it acceptable (normal) to have to shim a scope in the mounts from time to time?

Thanks.

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Elkins45
February 2, 2013, 01:18 PM
Before you go to such extremes it might well be worth your time to recenter the scope recticle in the tube. Then you can see how far you will need to mechanically adjust the mount to align the tube with the bore.

Stand the front lens of the scope on a hand mirror on a table. Try really hard to center your eye over the eyepiece and look down through the scope. You will see two sets of crosshairs, one in the tube and one reflected. Turn the adjustment dials until the two sets of crosshairs line up. That means the reticle is centered in the scope tube.

Now go back and mount it and shoot it again. How far it's off target will give you a true picture of how much work is needed to fix it.

I have a Leupold I couldn't get to elevate enough. I called them and the guy on the phone said he thought the internal adjustment tube was probably hitting the inside of the scope. His suggestion was to perform the centering procedure above, then remount it and set the horizontal adjustment without changing the vertical. Once the horizontal was set I began adjusting it vertically and suddenly there was enough adjustment range where there wasn't before!

The good news is that it costs $0 to try.

madcratebuilder
February 2, 2013, 02:12 PM
Burris Zee rings well fix your problem.

c.latrans
February 2, 2013, 02:14 PM
If you have to, you can. Brass shim stock from the parts house comes in several thicknesses, and bites nicely. I have used it in the past with good results. The process was much more common say 25 years ago when fewer options were available. In one case, I used it to raise the rear of a Leupold 2-7 on an old Ruger model 77. Worked great for many years, never shifted a whisker. Good luck!

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