Anybody store powder in their freezer?


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Elkins45
February 2, 2013, 12:44 PM
I have some extra room in my freezer (no 3rd deer this year) and I also just got a good deal on an 8lb jug of Promo. It's not been opened and won't be until I finish the jug I'm using now. Is there any reason not to just drop it in the freezer rather than storing it on a shelf? My thinking is that the inside of a 0 degree insulated container would be an excellent spot to prevent powder from somehow being involved in a fire until the whole place would already be a lost cause.

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rcmodel
February 2, 2013, 12:47 PM
I wouldn't.

Yes, it would be a fire-proof storage.

But you will get moisture condensation on & in the can when you bring it out into a warm room to use it.

rc

ReloaderFred
February 2, 2013, 12:56 PM
Powder is meant to be stored in a cool, dry place, not the freezer. Condensation would be a problem when it was thawed out, and moisture is an enemy to powder.

Hope this helps.

Fred

Elkins45
February 2, 2013, 01:13 PM
I don't think I did a good job of explaining. It would be stored in the factory unopened and sealed container until I needed it the first time. After that it would go on the shelf with the other open bottles. The freezer is just for storage until first opening. Since it's sealed the only moisture that could condense inside the jug is whatever moisture is there already, and presumably there shouldn't be any.

zxcvbob
February 2, 2013, 01:15 PM
Promo is a good powder. If you bought it to load handgun cartridges, you now have a lifetime supply :D I would not store it in the freezer, just put it in the basement if you have one.

dsm
February 2, 2013, 01:36 PM
I wouldn't. Store it in your basement in a metal cabinet or something. I have kitchen cabinets in my basement that I store powder in.

jack44
February 2, 2013, 01:44 PM
No I never herd that before..........STRANGE

357Shooter
February 2, 2013, 02:45 PM
NOT a good idea, you will get alot of frozen condensation in there, your freezer has "thaw" cycles for frost free operation. Take some rice and seal it in a mason jar with a rubberseal and leave it for a year, half full, like your powder would be...it'll surprise you.

Elkins45
February 2, 2013, 03:14 PM
NOT a good idea, you will get alot of frozen condensation in there, your freezer has "thaw" cycles for frost free operation. Take some rice and seal it in a mason jar with a rubberseal and leave it for a year, half full, like your powder would be...it'll surprise you.
That actually sounds like an interesting experiment, assuming I cam get the rice as dry as factory sealed powder.

The freezer in question is a chest freezer, not a refrigerator. It doesn't self-defrost.

Hondo 60
February 2, 2013, 03:51 PM
presumably there shouldn't be any

Not sure why you'd presume that.

Powder is not vacuum sealed, so certainly will be atleast some moisture.

As others have said, I wouldn't.
Powder can last for decades when stored in a cool dry place.

Leadhead
February 2, 2013, 03:54 PM
Freezers are best for food.

Recruit
February 2, 2013, 04:06 PM
I think the key to Elkins45 question isn't whether the freezer provides increased storage life compared to a cool basement.

He's concerned about providing an increased degree of fireproofing that would not be detrimental to the powder.

Leadhead
February 2, 2013, 04:36 PM
If your house is burning down your freezer is toast. Powder is not really an explosive if it isn't contained in a strong enclosure.

Drail
February 2, 2013, 04:48 PM
There is absolutely no reason to store powder in your freezer. It won't help it last any longer. Store it on a nice dry warm shelf away from water heaters and furnaces or electrostatic air cleaners in the original factory package.

RugerBob
February 2, 2013, 04:53 PM
I thought powder was supposed to be stored in a strong ,yet breathable type container.
I will have to check local codes again. I went through that about 10 years ago.

J_McLeod
February 2, 2013, 04:54 PM
I store mine in the garage, it's about the same thing right now.

kingmt
February 3, 2013, 04:15 AM
Is it needed? No.

Will it hurt it? No.

tightgroup tiger
February 3, 2013, 07:18 AM
I don't think I did a good job of explaining. It would be stored in the factory unopened and sealed container until I needed it the first time. After that it would go on the shelf with the other open bottles.

Think of is this way. Take a frozen steak out of the freezer and open it. It will immediately frost over from the moisture in the air getting on the steak and freezing to it.

If you take the powder out of a freezer and open it it will do the same. The powder will be below freezing and the second it is opened the it will make frost. When the frost melts, moisture-water is now is mixed in the powder.

To make matters worse, even if it is sealed, the air in the bottle of powder will shrink from the cold in the freezer and the plastic jug will collaspe, the plastic will get very brittle and crack from the stress and let the frost in without you knowing anything is happening.
Then your powder expensive powder is ruined.

If the jug doesn't collaspe then the seal has leaked and has sucked in frozen air and that's even worse.
Either way you will be out a jug of powder.

thump_rrr
February 3, 2013, 08:10 AM
If you want to protect the powder from going up in a small fire you can build a wooden box out of 3/4" plywood and line it inside and out with 5/8" type X fire rated drywall.

klausman
February 3, 2013, 08:41 AM
I wouldn't do this. When in doubt, contact Alliant. Their technical people are top notch and most helpful.

higgite
February 3, 2013, 09:38 AM
If this was a good idea, someone would already have an "Acme Fireproof Powder Freezer" on the market.

Drail
February 3, 2013, 09:42 AM
Factory powder containers are not "breathable". They are designed to rupture at low pressure so there will not be a high pressure "explosion". They are airtight to protect the powder from moisture. Just put it on a shelf at room temp in a dry place with nothing that can spark or create heat. You are kind of overthinking this. If you are going to store powder in your home you need to be very concious of any possible fire hazards.

kingmt
February 3, 2013, 09:55 AM
There has been several people on here that has put powder in the freezer & after everyone jumped on them they reported back no problems.

Wish you guys would either state facts or make it clear your just saying what you think. Just because you believe it doesn't make it fact & we have enough disinformation on here.

Magnum Shooter
February 3, 2013, 10:31 AM
Well I see absolutely no benefit from doing it, and it could cause condensation inside the container upon opening, so why do it?

Elkins45
February 3, 2013, 10:48 AM
As long as the powder is allowed to come to temp before opening the only moisture that could condense inside the container is the moisture that is already there. This assumes, of course, that the container isn't compromised.

I'm just doing a thought experiment here, but how is this functionally different than shipping an uninsulated tractor trailer load of powder across the midwest in February? Surely the powder inside the trailer (at least the jugs closest to the outside) drops below freezing on a multi-day truck ride from Kansas to North Dakota. Wouldn't it suffer the same problem when the driver hauls it out of the back of the truck and drops it off at a 70 degree gun store?

Meta
February 3, 2013, 11:16 AM
Look, aside from the debate about how many angels can dance on the freezer, the reality is that you'll be dead and gone before your powder has passed it's expiration. Storing it in your basement, storing it in your garage, or storing it under your bed at night is not going to alter this aging trajectory enough to matter. I'm shooting some powders that are 50 years old and they still go bang. Don't stress the little things and do more shooting.

Elkins45
February 3, 2013, 11:54 AM
Storing it in your basement, storing it in your garage, or storing it under your bed at night is not going to alter this aging trajectory enough to matter.

I do have to disagree with one thing you said: storing powder in the garage is a bad idea for me at least. My garage is uninsulated and temps go well above 100F during the summer. That kind of heat cycling can seriously increase the decomposition rate of powders.

Besides, the idea isn't to slow the aging, because I know that the powder will probably still be good long after I'm not. The question is really more about providing an added bit of safety until I get around to using it. Storing it inside the freezer might provide a little more protection should there be a small fire or other ignition source. I think we can all agree that a small fire wouldn't be small anymore after it ignites 8 lbs of double based pistol powder!

If you want to protect the powder from going up in a small fire you can build a wooden box out of 3/4" plywood and line it inside and out with 5/8" type X fire rated drywall.

I actually have one with 1" walls, and it's located under the place where the ABS plastic water line enters the house. If my powder supply ever ignites, the heat will melt the pipe and (hopefully) flood the powder and disperse and extinguish it. But I was thinking that even though I have a powder 'magazine' that meets code it might still be a smart idea to not have all of my powder supply in the same concentrated spot. The freezer is on the other side of the basement.

splattergun
February 3, 2013, 12:13 PM
I have some extra room in my freezer (no 3rd deer this year) and I also just got a good deal on an 8lb jug of Promo. It's not been opened and won't be until I finish the jug I'm using now. Is there any reason not to just drop it in the freezer rather than storing it on a shelf? My thinking is that the inside of a 0 degree insulated container would be an excellent spot to prevent powder from somehow being involved in a fire until the whole place would already be a lost cause.
No.

hueyville
February 3, 2013, 07:36 PM
Read following links. No manufacturers recommend storing in freezer. That might be a clue...

http://www.alliantpowder.com/getting_started/safety/storage_handling.aspx

http://www.imrpowder.com/safeinfo.html

Hondo 60
February 3, 2013, 10:37 PM
Elkins - as stated above, you're only subjecting it to the moisture already inside the jug.
I guess there'd be no harm in freezing it, as long as you allow it to come to room temp before opening the jug.

But why bother?
I don't believe there's any advantage to keeping it in the freezer.
(maybe if you intend on storing it for 50 years or more????)

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