New to Reloading


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CPLofMARINES
February 3, 2013, 09:40 PM
I may be a few months away when I start, when finances
Open up. But I have a lot of questions, but I am viewing,
Reading and taking notes. So, please be patient. I have
Read here that W296 powder is good for .357 Mag but
Can you also use that for .44 Mag. ? When I start I plan
To start with .38/.357 then move to .44spl/.44Mag Being
That is what I shoot the most. Thank you all for your help.

Semper Fi

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Utryme
February 3, 2013, 09:45 PM
I use H110 for my 44 mag carbines. I'm told 296 is the same powder.

gamestalker
February 3, 2013, 09:52 PM
Yes, 296 will work very well for both .357 mag and 44 mag. However, 38 spcl and 44 spcl can not be loaded with it.

Also know that 296 is a full house magnum powder and can not be reduced below published loads. And it requires a magnum primer to properly light it up. Also, you must use a very firm roll crimp or the bullets will litterally jump out of the case mouths before making it to battery.

I've been loading almost exclusively with this powder for my magnum wheel guns for many years, and it behaves very consistently and predictably. It also performs best when taken up toward the higher end of the charge table.

GS

Reefinmike
February 3, 2013, 09:56 PM
as utryme said, h110 is the same as win296. just as how hp38 is the same as win231. But yes, 296 is good for a full house hand stinger, but you dont get many loadings out of a pound of powder. I use hp38/win231 for 38 special and it works well for mild 357 loads. I dont load 44 mag but it seems 296/h110 is a preferred powder.

Lost Sheep
February 3, 2013, 11:01 PM
I may be a few months away when I start, when finances
Open up. But I have a lot of questions, but I am viewing,
Reading and taking notes. So, please be patient. I have
Read here that W296 powder is good for .357 Mag but
Can you also use that for .44 Mag. ? When I start I plan
To start with .38/.357 then move to .44spl/.44Mag Being
That is what I shoot the most. Thank you all for your help.

Semper Fi
Thanks for your service to our country. Welcome to loading.

That (those) powder give the best performance for recoil and pressure of just about any handgun powder, but if you make a mis-step, they are unforgiving.

What I am saying is that I would not learn to reload using either of those powders.

As you do your reading, pay attention to the subject of powder "quickness". Also the subjects of detonation, pressure spiking and "ringing". While these subjects are controversial (and some even deny the phenomenon exists) caution is to be observed.

When I taught my friend to load, I started him using Trail Boss in his 500 S&W Magnum. It is easy to use, to see in the case, results in low-recoil and low-pressure ammunition and lets you get the basics of the bullets, primers, cases, seating, crimping and cross-checking quality control.

He still uses Trail Boss in addition to Unique, H110 and a couple of other powders. TB is really good for when he wants to let curious onlookers fire off a few rounds of 500 Smith. They can start out with the TB rounds (300 grains at 850 fps) which recoil like a 22 rimfire in that heavy gun. If they like that, they move up to the higher power loads, 350 grains at 1200, and then the 375 grainers over H110 if they like. Only about half do.

In my opinion, Trail Boss is the ticket for learning.

Good luck,

Lost Sheep

CPLofMARINES
February 3, 2013, 11:07 PM
What Reefinmike says u don't get many loadings out of a pound.
About how many?? Because a high volume of powder
Is used, also would this be a forgiving powder or one
For an experience reloader ? Thank you

CPLofMARINES
February 3, 2013, 11:18 PM
Lost Sheep, I must have been typing while u were. So,
I have not heard much talk about Trail Boss. Based on what
I have mentioned what could I load with it?

Hondo 60
February 3, 2013, 11:19 PM
The best advice anyone can give you is to get atleast 2 or 3 reloading manuals.
Read them cover to cover atleast twice.

Then you will know what questions to ask.

Manuals like Lyman's 49th Reloading Handbook have a GREAT how-to section & tons of load data.

That data will tell you what bullet, what powder, how much etc, etc.
By reading one, you'll know what powders are really good for what caliber & what bullet.
You'll find that some powders are better with jacketed bullets, whereas some are better with lead.

By the way, w296 is not one of my favorites.

Lost Sheep
February 3, 2013, 11:19 PM
Have you read "The ABC's of Reloading"? Compiled by editors, it features a variety of writers which affords different points of view and speaks in different "voices". Also, almost every loading manual has, in the early chapters, descriptions of the loading processes. Your base library will likely have copies, or your local city library.

Does your base have a gun club? I got a lot of use from the Eglin Air Base club when I was stationed at Hurlburt Field. Though I already knew how to load.

Here are some links to threads you might find interesting

let me share with you some posts and threads I think you will enjoy. So get a large mug of coffee, tea, hot chocolate, whatever you keep on hand when you read and think and read through these.


The "sticky" thread at the top of TheHighRoad.com's reloading forum is good, entitled, "For the New Reloader: Thinking about Reloading; Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST"
http://www.thehighroad.org//showthread.php?t=238214

The "sticky" thread at the top of TheFiringLine's reloading forum is good, entitled, "For the New Reloader: Equipment Basics -- READ THIS FIRST "
http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=230171

"Budget Beginning bench you will never outgrow for the novice handloader". This was informed by my recent (July 2010) repopulation of my loading bench. It is what I would have done 35 years ago if I had known then what I know now.
http://rugerforum.net/reloading/2938...andloader.html

Thread entitled "Newby needs help."
http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=430391
My post 11 is entitled "Here's my reloading setup, which I think you might want to model" November 21, 2010)
My post 13 is "10 Advices for the novice handloader" November 21, 2010)

The first draft of my "10 Advices..." is on page 2 of this thread, about halfway down.
http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=13543

Minimalist minimal
http://www.rugerforum.com/phpBB/viewtopic.php?t=107332

http://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=439810

Good luck,

Lost Sheep

CPLofMARINES
February 3, 2013, 11:33 PM
Thank u all for your help. I am sure I'll chime back in for
Your advice in the future.

Semper Fi

ArchAngelCD
February 4, 2013, 01:30 AM
Like said above, W296/H110 is a very good powder for both the .357 Magnum and .44 Magnum. It's more suited for full power loads than middle loads and Hodgdon recommends you do not download that powder more than 3% from the Max charge. For the .38 Special and .44 Special I look to the other Winchester powder, W231. W231/HP-38 is much better suited for the Specials and can be safely downloaded to different levels.

My "Powder Trinity" is W231 (HP-38), W540 (HS-6) and W296 (H110). I load almost everything with those 3 powders and they do very well.

If you're looking for a Magnum powder that's more flexible 2400 or AA#9 would be good choices but again, for full power loads W296 can't be beat...

Lost Sheep
February 4, 2013, 04:31 AM
What Reefinmike says u don't get many loadings out of a pound.
About how many?? Because a high volume of powder
Is used, also would this be a forgiving powder or one
For an experience reloader ? Thank you
Different powders have different energy densities and different volume densities. A full load of H110 (filling the case to the bottom of the seated bullet) is approximately the full charge. The same thing holds for Trail Boss. But H110 has a lot more energy packed into that volume.

Trail Boss was developed about 5 or 6 years ago specifically for CASS (Cowboy Action Shooting Sports) which uses lead bullets at black powder pressures and velocities. At first, the maker did not recommend Trail Boss for jacketed bullets, but only for lead. That has since been opened up, but you have to take care not to let velocities fall too low or you could get a jacketed or plated bullet stuck in the bore (and the next shot likely to blow up the gun). But if you keep charges to the point where velocities are reliably above 800 fps this is unlikely.

The two powders are VERY different except that they tend to fill the case.

Bullseye powder is also good for lighter loads, but to get proper pressures and velocities takes a very little, and it is easy to get too much if you are not observant. So it scares me a little. So, TB is my choice for beginners. Bullseye, Unique, Red Dot and others like that for experienced , careful loaders in search of target/plinking loads and 2400 for mid-range to near-maximum loads and H110 (which, frankly, scares me a little, too.)

TB is be good for any straight-walled cartridges shooting lead bullets. That is what it was intended for. But it has been found to be good for bottlenecked cartridges and for plated and jacketed bullets, too. But there is no load data for those uses. The standard rule of thumb is to fill the case up to the bottom of where the seated bullet will be and weigh that amount of powder. Take 70% of that weight and that is your charge. You can increase that up to 100%, watching for signs of pressure along the way.

Lost Sheep

ArchAngelCD
February 4, 2013, 04:56 AM
If you use Trail Boss just remember to NEVER compress the load or break up the little donuts that are the powder. Pressure spikes can and will happen if you do that!

mrnic3guy1989
February 4, 2013, 11:59 AM
IDK how to start a thread or I would've but I to need help with reloading and hand loading. I have a .45 and am currently waiting on my refund to pay the rest of my G20 off and I want to learn how to hand load and reload. I have read that a lot of factory loads are weak for the 10mm and I would enjoy the satisfaction of hand loading and reloading .45 and 10mm. Can someone tell me a starter kit or what all I will need to obtain in order to start and I'm a college kid so I don't have ally of cash please keep that in mind. I would really love some advice from some of the knowledgeable and thrifty people of this forum, thank you and sorry if I hijacked the thread.

izhevsk
February 4, 2013, 12:09 PM
Run through the links provided by Lost Sheep in post #9.

mrnic3guy1989
February 4, 2013, 12:14 PM
Thank you very much.

TenDriver
February 4, 2013, 12:51 PM
My first indoctrination to reloads was a friend of a friend reloading .357 with W296 at close to the max. Within half a grain I was told. Out of my SP-101, I'd get about three feet of fire out of the muzzle and asked not to do that anymore at least once at an indoor range due to the insane noise coming out of that thing.

That was of course before I learned to caution other people's reloads (no side story).

hueyville
February 4, 2013, 01:28 PM
Unique, 2400 and Bullseye in that order. Be careful with Bullseye but a mainstay for light target loads on a budget.

Trent
February 4, 2013, 01:48 PM
I may be a few months away when I start, when finances
Open up. But I have a lot of questions, but I am viewing,
Reading and taking notes. So, please be patient. I have
Read here that W296 powder is good for .357 Mag but
Can you also use that for .44 Mag. ? When I start I plan
To start with .38/.357 then move to .44spl/.44Mag Being
That is what I shoot the most. Thank you all for your help.

Semper Fi

Make sure you pick up a book or two! Sierras is great, and has a heck of a lot of information about the reloading process.

Good manuals are indispensable for getting through the beginnings of the reloading process. Reading internet forums can yield some good tips, but it all is kind of "disjointed", little bits of info here and there. The way it's presented in proper reloading manuals really lays it out well, step by step.

Have fun, be safe, and welcome to the hobby. :)

CPLofMARINES
February 5, 2013, 10:24 AM
Post #18 hueyville, "be careful with Bullseye" Is that
Because you have to make sure velocities are not too
Low ??
Thank u
Semper Fi

BossHogg
February 5, 2013, 10:50 AM
I use Universal Clays (mid burn rate) and Bullyseye ( fast burn rate ) for almost all my reloading calibers. Bullseye would be great for 38 spl and the 44 spl with accurate target loads. When I want a hotter load I move up to Universal Clays for my 357 mag. As I don't load at the top of the Magnum levels these serve my purpose.

FROGO207
February 5, 2013, 12:49 PM
Be careful of Bullseye because you can double or even tripple charge the brass before seating a bullet by accident and that WILL blow up your firearm as well as possibly your hand/more. When starting to reload you should start by filling cases with a propellant that will fill that case more than 1/2 way full with a charge so you can easily see if there is too much in there and thus avoid blowing up anything. The more "economical" propellants tend to fill the case only a small amount as they have more energy packed into that smaller amount to yield the same results. This is really a double edged sword to the new reloader. Finally this should not be a problem after you understand what the many dangerous things to look for are once you have reloaded for a while. Think of it like a self imposed learners permit for safety.:cool: I agree that you should get a couple or three reloading manuals and study them well before you start this adventure, it will save you time/money/body parts IMHO.:)

Reloading is not unsafe at all if you approach it with an open mind and plenty of caution while following the directions in a good reloading book.

rfwobbly
February 5, 2013, 02:42 PM
Mr Marine -
Thank you for your service.

The over-riding concern in reloading is always chamber pressure. You will quickly work out a loading process that helps you maintain high accuracy in powder measurements, but for safety sake let's start with a benign round. If you own a 357 Mag, then I'd suggest you learn the basics by reloading 38 Spcl for several months. That's a low pressure round and when shot in a 357 gun will give you extra layers of security.

THEN, when you have a better idea how to set the dies, how your powder measure is going to behave, which brand of bullet you like working with, how to keep your reloading notebook, and a million other start-up details, THEN you can move on to 357 Mag. Learn to walk before you try running.


What Reefinmike says u don't get many loadings out of a pound.

It really doesn't matter. If you'll cost out all your components, the bullet and primer cost more by far. You may consume more powder by volume, but not by cost. Powder is by far the lowest of all your expenses.

;)

splattergun
February 5, 2013, 10:23 PM
What Reefinmike says u don't get many loadings out of a pound.
About how many?? Because a high volume of powder
Is used, also would this be a forgiving powder or one
For an experience reloader ? Thank you

1 pound of powder = 7000 grains. So a 15 grain charge would yield approximately 466 rounds. Approximate, because there are always small discrepencies such as weight variance, spillage, etc. But it's a good fact to remember.

hueyville
February 5, 2013, 10:30 PM
+1 to FROG. A triple charge of Bullseye in a 44 mag could make for a bad day. I don't think you can blow yourself up with Unique without doing it on purpose.

Lost Sheep
February 6, 2013, 02:24 AM
+1 to FROG. A triple charge of Bullseye in a 44 mag could make for a bad day. I don't think you can blow yourself up with Unique without doing it on purpose.
In a large case, you CAN double charge with Unique. That's why I recommend Trail Boss. It is a very voluminous powder.

Lost Sheep

hueyville
February 6, 2013, 02:46 AM
A good 44 mag would stand up to a double on Unique. Not all the.powder would burn before bullet exited barrel thus dropping the.pressure curve. Cases be a tad difficult to extract. I have a 44 special load that is exactly double the starting charge for particular bullet and unique. The odd times when I took a pistol into bear country, have a 5 shot, 3" barrel Rossi that has stood up to several cylinder full of this load in a Ransom Rest. If no kill bear with bullet, set him on fire from the muzzle blast.

savanahsdad
February 6, 2013, 03:52 AM
lost sheep makes a good point. fine a good powder that will fill the case, no risk of a dbl charge, when I started reloading 2400 was the go-to powder , I have never used trail boss , (it's new to most of us) I like W296/H110. I buy it buy the keg:D, with 2400 you can find good start loads and if you over charge a bit you will be ok , yet you can load good full house loads with it , when I started reloding I got IMR4831 for my 270win and Bulls Eye for my 44mag :what: yet I have all my fingers , safty is more about the loader than the powder,
like others have said get some books and read up on everything, , alway check your load data for primer type, just because you are loading for a 44mag or a 357mag dose not meen you need a mag primer, read up on powders, most load books have a chapter on powders, and a lot of what you have read here will make more sence,
good luck and welcome to the world of reloading

Trent
February 6, 2013, 09:40 AM
Heck you can double charge unique in the little 45ACP if you're loading a moderate load with 230gr.

If you're shooting 185gr a double charge is generally much more noticeable and results in quite a mess.

Double charge / no charge is the worst sort of mistake because it can blow up a gun. It's also one of the most common mistakes that new reloaders make, because there's so much going on that's new, it's hard to focus attention on just the one task at hand.

Which brings me to a point. When you are doing something with reloading, give it your FULL and UNDIVIDED attention. No distractions. No TV. No "company is over, look what I can do." No booze!

No distractions.

Keep yourself focused on the ONE task you are doing. Do the SAME task to the entire block of 50 rounds you're working on, all at once.

Get everything set up right - dies at proper length, powder charge in dumper weighed and the volume set - clean your bench off of other crap that don't need to be there - take ONE test round through the entire process to make sure it's GOOD (good sizing, primer seated OK, powder charge from the hopper, seating depth, OAL, crimp OK, etc.)

Then...

Put 50 cleaned cases in a loading block.

(If not using carbide dies) - Lube all 50

Size all 50.

Bell all 50 (if necessary). (Can be same step as above if using a manually indexed turret press, that's where they really shine)

Inspect all 50 for cracks and oddities - corn cob in the flash hole? Cracks on the neck? Etc.

Prime all 50.

Dump powder in all 50. (Or, if single loading, dump powder and seat, but for straight wall pistol ammo it's generally much faster if you're dumping by volume)

Settle powder by tapping, tilt the block, and inspect all 50 for the correct powder charge.

Seat/Crimp all 50 (might be separate process if you have a dedicated crimp die, such as for rifle reloading, pistol is usually same process.)

Inspect all 50 again. (Necks may crack on bullet seating if brass is old, etc)

(If lubed cases prior to sizing, wipe lube off)

ArchAngelCD
February 6, 2013, 11:42 AM
CPLofMARINES,
Did you notice the posts with Bullseye (1898), Unique (1900) and 2400 (1932)? Those powders are the original "powder trinity" and the first two go way back to the beginnings of smokeless powder reloading by Laflin & Rand. Those 3 powders were then made by DuPont, then Hercules and now by Alliant. They work well but I prefer the Winchester powders I mentioned in Post #11. Back then reloaders have very few choices and picking a powder wasn't as confusing as it is today. There must be at lease 50 handgun powders available to the reloader today from Hodgdon/IMR/Winchester, Alliant, Accurate Arms, Ramshot and Vihtavuori.

Just know this, many are similar and a few are exactly the same. Many will deliver the same or similar results. I picked a company and stayed with it for the most part and that choice was dictated by what was available and cost effective where I live. BUT, I like to try a lot of different powders but I always seem to come back the the 3 Winchester powder I like best.

Don't let all of this overwhelm you, it's really not as complicated as it first seems. You will do fine and hopefully we can help you...

CPLofMARINES
February 6, 2013, 01:26 PM
Thank you everyone for your help. I am gonna go out
Today an get Lyman's 49th

Semper Fi

James2
February 6, 2013, 01:35 PM
For starters on those calibers, I am going to suggest Unique and 2400. You can play with H110 and the hotter loads after you learn the basics of the game. I don't think it is a good learning powder. Enjoy the new hobby. It has sure been a good one for me.

About double charges: Rule 1: Don't let it happen, period!

Here's how to avoid it: Get a loading board and when loading powder put the cases with powder in them in the loading board, then when it is full, take it under the light so you can look into each case to spot any doubles or any that don't look uniform. Now that you are sure that there are no doubles, you can set the board down and set a bullet on each casing, then proceed to seat bullets. Oh, as you seat bullets, get all other brass out of immediate reach so that you don't inadvertently grab a brass that does not have powder in it and seat a bullet on it. (How do I know this can happen? ;) )

The powder measure can't dump a double, only the operator can. Bridging can give you a double so watch that. The key is LOOK AT THEM before putting a bullet on them.

By adhering to this rule you should never have squibs nor doubles!

I use a powder measure to drop powder as most do, and it can't drop a double, however if you get a bridge in the drop tube and it doesn't all fall, but falls in the next casing, you have a light one and a heavy one. I use a knocker after each drop and seldom have bridging, (some powders are worse than others to bridge) but know the possibility is there.

Lo8080
February 6, 2013, 02:19 PM
Im new to reloading as well. My Lyman 49th came in the mail 4 days ago and I've already got a backorder of equipment and dies ready to go. I bought a Lee 4 hole turret press, carbine dies for 9mm/45ACP and 3 other items and already its $225+ shipping in the hole.
This looks like it could get expensive and I think Im getting into this at the wrong time. It seems every website out there has there products on backorder. Thats ultimately my question here>
How much has price of equipment (i.e presses, dies, powder, primers, bullets, etc.) gone up in this ammo hoarding craze?

CPLofMARINES
February 6, 2013, 02:25 PM
Lo8080, did u buy directly from LEE ??

James2
February 6, 2013, 02:33 PM
I buy locally and haven't noticed price increases. What I have noticed is the shelves are bare. On eBay for used stuff the price has tripled or worse. It may not be a good time to buy, but if you are wanting to get started, get the minimum tools to get started for now then more later when things settle down a bit. Unfortunately I can't predict when that may be. Are there local sporting goods or hardware stores there that sell components? That is a good place to look and also some Walmarts sell tools, books and components. (A book should be number one on the list of things to buy.)

Lo8080
February 6, 2013, 02:37 PM
CPLMARINES, No I bought from MidwayUSA.

ATLDave
February 6, 2013, 02:53 PM
Lots of good advice here. I took up reloading last year, and here are the things I would suggest (little of this is new):

1. See if you can find a mentor reloader who can walk you through the process a few times. The process isn't hard, but you don't want to feel like you're guessing about what might be right.

2. Buy more than one reloading manual, and read them cover to cover. I read two before I even unboxed my reloading press. I've since bought a few more, and enjoy reading them, too. Lots of interesting stuff.

3. Start with a "safe" cartridge and a "safe" powder. I started by loading mid-range .38 specials (not +P's) for shooting in a .357 revolver. I figured that gave me at least a little margin for error. And, as others have suggested, try to pick something with good case fill, not a small-volume fast-burning powder, or a finicky slow-burning magnum. I started with Unique, and a lot of other folks start there, too.

4. Record a lot of data about what you're doing. Weigh every finished round. Measure every finished round. The process of measuring and recording will slow down your reloading rate. That's a good thing for a beginer. Go slow, be careful, and retain all your fingers!

5. When you're picking out a "recipe" to try, find multiple sources for load data. Powder manufacturers often put some data online (some more than others). You'll notice they are not all the same. But the overlap areas/quantities should be quite safe.

6. Make sure to get your primers seated. The only problems I've had with my loads have been a small number of rounds where the primer did not get absolutely, fully seated. That causes ignition problems, or can bind up a revolver.

CPLofMARINES
February 6, 2013, 09:44 PM
I went to Barnes & Nobles tonight and all I found was
Handloader magazine. I guess I'll order Lyman's 49th
Edition through Cabela's. BTW I was reading through
One of my gun magazines and someone wrote how they
Use Unique for .44 Spl and .44 Mag. So Unique is
Another option for magnums ??
Thank you all for your help. This is really a great place
For help and I can tell all the folks here are some
Really good people.
Semper Fi

FROGO207
February 6, 2013, 10:37 PM
You CAN load both the 44 SPL and 44 MAG using Unique but the MAG velocity will be slower than the max you could get with a better choice of propellant. A propellant with a slower burn rate like 2400 will give you more bullet speed with a lower total pressure and therefore better performance in the magnum loading. There are some on this forum that load all their handgun rounds using one propellant and it works---barely/passably----but it works. For better performance a propellant match for each round/load will prove better in the end.

HighExpert
February 9, 2013, 08:01 PM
The other problem with BE in a .44 mag is even when you load absolute maximum you cannot get close to max velocity. The simple explanation is that BE goes Bang and 2400 goes BAAAAAANG. Quick pressure spike and all gone or still pushing half way down the barrel and maybe, in the case of 296 still burning when the bullet has exited the barrel.

larryh1108
February 9, 2013, 08:48 PM
I have also decided to get into reloading. I found Lyman's manual at Amazon's last night and ordered it. I realize I have to wait a bit for all the parts and supplies to get back to "normal" but in the mean time I wish to read and learn as much as I can. Everything posted here has been great and very helpful Thanks guys!

My question:
I have a lot of 1911s and then I have a lot of shorter barrels for CCW. Is there a better powder for the 3" CCW pistols like the Solo or PM9, etc? Thanks again.

HighExpert
February 10, 2013, 01:25 AM
I find Bullseye to be a pretty good short barrel powder because it burns fully even is a short barrel. It is usually not known for max verlocities but, you aren't going to get them in a short barrel anyway.

CPLofMARINES
February 14, 2013, 10:38 PM
Well I received Lyman's 49th edition in the mail yesterday
From Cabela's. This is my first reloading manual I have
Purchased but I expected a bit more load tables. Can
Anyone recommend a manual with more in depth data.

Semper Fi

twofifty
February 14, 2013, 11:25 PM
CPLMarine, you intend to start loading for 38/357, then 44Spl and 44Mag.
Now you have a Lyman's 49th ed. manual.

Nest steps:

1. decide to start learning how to load the 38 Special - it is lower pressure than the 357.
1a. read and re-read the manual before going any further.

2. pick a bullet weight and construction that suits your needs. Lyman's 48th ed. lists 5 different jacketed bullet weights and 7 different cast bullet weights for 38 Special. Choose one bullet for which Lyman's provides a recipe that uses components that are readily available in your area.

3. buy that bullet and powder combo - pistol primers too.

4. Though brass can often be purchased as once fired -or scrounged at the range- imo a new reloader has enough to pay attention to without having to cull worn-out brass or check for signs of incipient case failure.

4. Work up a load per the instructions in Lyman's.

5. Eventually, as you gain knowledge, you will figure out when it is possible to extrapolate load development for bullets that are similar to but not the same as what's listed in a manual.

6. Finally, bullet and powder mfg's often have useful load data online.

readyeddy
February 15, 2013, 02:50 AM
W296 starts at 1400 fps with 240 gr. JHP 44 mag. Unique and HS6 start at around 1100 fps. I personally have no need to push my 44 beyond 1200 fps.

Sierra's manual has more info, but they only list data for their own bullets.

CPLofMARINES
February 15, 2013, 10:55 AM
Thank you for the heads up on Sierra's manual. Lyman's
Did not show any in between loads, it just showed starting
And max. When working up do you just guess and
Experiment ?? Like I mentioned I am in the educating
Stage and pricing to get a feel for what this could cost
Me, as I am quite a few months away from getting
Started, I am in no hurry. Thank you all for your help !
BTW I would like to get another manual, not sure which
One though ?

Semper Fi

rcmodel
February 15, 2013, 11:00 AM
Lyman's Did not show any in between loads, it just showed starting And max. Thats all most manuals show, if that much.

Some, like Alliant data only show the Max load and you have to do the math to get the 10% reduction for the starting load.

Yes, you start low and work up in steps until you get the desired accurcy, firearms cycling & feeding, etc. you are after.

rc

Trent
February 15, 2013, 11:00 AM
Well, you safely guess and experiment.

If there's 2 grains between min and max, I would do .4 gr increments for four steps, then start sneaking up on max, maybe another .2, then .1 and .1. If there's any changes in your brass or primers (signs of overpressure), you found your max.

Since you are just starting out I would recommend NOT going over max. If you see overpressure signs before you get to max (cratered primers), stop.

ATLDave
February 15, 2013, 11:44 AM
If you're determined to find a manual that steps up in 50fps increments, Hornady's manual does that. (Or at least the one I has does; I think they may have come out with a new one in the last couple months, and I haven't seen it.)

But, as others noted, working up from the start loads until you get what YOU want in YOUR gun is sensible. Besides, the numbers given in manuals are for THEIR guns or test barrels. You won't be getting exactly the same numbers in yours.

Searcher4851
February 15, 2013, 12:05 PM
That's the beauty of reloading. You get to tailor your cartridges to your guns. There's a lot of trial and error, but you find the best load for your particular gun.

As others have mentioned, you always want to start from the low end on powder charges and work your way up. That way the "errors" in your trial and error method are not dangerous errors, just sub-optimal performance errors. Personally, I never exceed published maximum loads for any cartridge I load. I've found that it's rare that a maximum load is more accurate than a lighter load, at least in the calibers I load for.

Trent
February 16, 2013, 11:09 AM
Just be prepared for stoppages if you're loading for an autoloader, those starting weights don't always cycle the slide!

I like to find the MINIMUM charge that will RELIABLY cycle the slide, for each autoloader handgun. It gives me a low recoil impulse round that I can use for training / plinking.

Lost Sheep
February 16, 2013, 04:01 PM
Just be prepared for stoppages if you're loading for an autoloader, those starting weights don't always cycle the slide!

I like to find the MINIMUM charge that will RELIABLY cycle the slide, for each autoloader handgun. It gives me a low recoil impulse round that I can use for training / plinking.
Once you find that marginal load, you can then practice failure-clearance drills (also known as Tap-Rack-Bang, among other names).

Load a magazine with those marginal loads and shoot a few roundswith a firm grip, then deliberately limp-wrist a shot, inducing a jam (I get stovepipes mostly).

Lost Sheep

Trent
February 16, 2013, 07:28 PM
Heh you brought back dark memories of my early days reloading.

First time I loaded anything for handgun, it was 9mm. I loaded up 200 of them on a single stage press. (Took awhile).

I get them to the range, and they won't cycle the slide on my handgun.

I got a LOT of tap-rack-bang practice.

Way too much of it, in fact.

HighExpert
February 19, 2013, 07:50 PM
If you are wanting to experiment with in between loads and considering the cost of components today, I would find someone with a copy of Quick Load software. You can add powders in .1 gr increments and see what the velocity and pressure will do. I usually recommend a middle of the road load with most powders. I also try to stay away from powders that do not offer this flexibility as I find them less useful and more dangerous. The main problem that I have encountered over the years when you start reloading or tell a friend that you reload is the first thing out of their mouths is "Let's build some hot loads." This is something like buying a new life vest and saying lets go out in the Atlantic and sink the boat and see how long we can float. STUPID. Don't be stupid. Have fun and good shooting.

kingmt
February 19, 2013, 08:53 PM
I don't like beating my guns apart with overcharged loads but the boat thing sounds fun. I'm game of anyone has the boat.

Lost Sheep
February 19, 2013, 11:25 PM
Well I received Lyman's 49th edition in the mail yesterday
From Cabela's. This is my first reloading manual I have
Purchased but I expected a bit more load tables. Can
Anyone recommend a manual with more in depth data.

Semper Fi
The series of books "One Book, One Caliber" are pretty good. About 5" x 8" and 30 or 40 pages containing loading data from many different sources, but no loading instructions. They are bound so they lay flat on your workbench, too. Right handy and just about $9 or $10 each.

Lost Sheep

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