How does one go about educating a rube...?


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unknwn
February 8, 2013, 10:55 AM
While at an auction the other night, during my attempts to find some guns to add to my collection, I witnessed a so-called "expert" (long-time gun auctioneer and FFL holder) pick up EVERY single-action revolver meant for bid (several new, many others like new -or- collectible) and casually "spin" the cylinder (at the podium,during the auctioneering,-for all to see!-, mind you), as if he couldn't help him-self but to repeatably hear and feel the rapid-fire click-click-click of the hand thrumming across the ratchet. Dolt !
Of all people, I could only expect that those tasked with wringing to absolute most from the resale of a client's property should know better than to "play with the merchandise", but above all, avoid abusing guns in thier care?
Jeez, what do you suspect happened behind the scenes during multilple episodes of unpackaging, inspection?(abuse), and repackaging before/after the sale?
I would have thought this dope would have had an inkling about acceptable behavior. As it seems -NOT a chance- .
Whiie watching his antics I went so far as to jump up and shout "stop that!" because he'd come to the last gun in the line (and the only one left that I would consider bidding on after watching the numb'skull's behavior) .
This company is no stranger to auctioneering, and routinely processes gun collections and commercial gun-related businesses, so its not like there should be ANY mystery here, but....

My question is: Since I get to go pick up my winning bidded Cimmaron Richards '60 after it's release from a NICS "Administrative delay" , I'd like to say something that might impart some bit of education about handling "other peoples guns" to this twit, and hopefully to be even somewhat democratic about couching my dismay toward his complimentary "revolver abuse" so that -just maybe- he will cease the practice, and not accelerate such occurences as a "spitefull reaction" to being called on his dumb-@$$ abuse of innocent revolvers.
A couple of days have elapsed since witnessing the ridiculous behavior, so I've calmed somewhat, and I'll be on his "home turf" to pick up my winning bid. Any pointers about how to address the circumstance? or am I going to be counseled to over-look it, turn my back, and walk away?

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CraigC
February 8, 2013, 11:08 AM
Good Lord, I don't know how you stood it! That kind of mishandling makes my skin crawl. I don't know what it is but some folks just like to hear it click and don't realize they're doing anything wrong. Any effort to correct this poor behavior can go either way, no matter how bluntly or gently it is delivered. He may be receptive and thank you for enlightening him and he me be the biggest A-hole you've ever met and receive said wisdom as a declaration of war on his ego. Personally, I'd have to say something but I'd do it as gently as possible. Because if I'm buying guns from their auction, I don't want this idiot handling them. If he reacts harshly, just walk away.

BHP FAN
February 8, 2013, 11:50 AM
wow. half cock, people!

4v50 Gary
February 8, 2013, 11:55 AM
Tell him you were trained in the following manner:

Put the gun on half cock and to turn the cylinder by hand to inspect it.
Then we were to put the gun on full cock before lowering the hammer by hand.
Doing this avoids marking up the cylinder.

Doak
February 8, 2013, 04:06 PM
Send him a Bill for $100...for your nerve damage...write it up humorously, so that he's not quite sure if you're serious or not... but still gets the message. :-D

J-Bar
February 8, 2013, 04:13 PM
If he is not the owner of the auction company, tell his boss.

Jim K
February 8, 2013, 04:49 PM
Maybe I am more tolerant, but if that is the worst thing you ever see someone do to a gun, you might survive.

At a gun show, I saw on a table a Colt Government Model in .455 Webley Auto, a pretty rare gun. I casually remarked to the exhibitor that the .455 magazine was too big for the standard .45 ACP pistol (the .455 is semi-rimmed). The seller told me I was wrong and that he was an expert. Picking up the .455 pistol he dropped the magazine and tried to force it into a standard .45 GI gun. It wouldn't fit. Then he proceeded to grab the .45 by the barrel and beat it against the table, trying to force the .455 magazine in. He finally got it almost all the way in, after bending the lanyard loop almost flat and bending the magazine lip. "See", he smirked, "it fits."

I just turned away. He had ruined a $150-200 magazine just to prove to me that he was an expert! Of course it was his magazine, but ....

Jim

CraigC
February 8, 2013, 05:20 PM
I'm totally tolerant of what people do to their own guns but when it's mine or something I'm there to buy, that tolerance dwindles. This is why when I buy a USFA, Colt or Old Model Ruger online and have to have it shipped to the local shop, I watch the tracking and am sure to be there shortly after it arrives. I've seen too many people in gun shops do too many stupid things to want my expensive new sixgun to be at the shop getting twirled on some idiot's finger, seeing how fast he can fan it or incessantly spin the cylinder like the nut in question.

phil dirt
February 8, 2013, 06:31 PM
First, hit him with a 2 by 4 at ear level to get his attention!

unknwn
February 8, 2013, 09:55 PM
"...Maybe I am more tolerant, but if that is the worst thing you ever see someone do to a gun, you might survive.

At a gun show, I saw on a table a Colt Government Model in .455 Webley Auto, a pretty rare gun. I casually remarked to the exhibitor that the .455 magazine was too big for the standard .45 ACP pistol (the .455 is semi-rimmed). The seller told me I was wrong and that he was an expert. Picking up the .455 pistol he dropped the magazine and tried to force it into a standard .45 GI gun. It wouldn't fit. Then he proceeded to grab the .45 by the barrel and beat it against the table, trying to force the .455 magazine in. He finally got it almost all the way in, after bending the lanyard loop almost flat and bending the magazine lip. "See", he smirked, "it fits."

I just turned away. He had ruined a $150-200 magazine just to prove to me that he was an expert! Of course it was his magazine, but ...."

The arrogance of some along with the stupidity of many people leaves me with a tendancy to want to weep when learning of examples like those described above.
I'm certain the buffoon that is involved in my situation doesn't own the auction company in charge of dispersing the gun collections in my area.
The "playfull idiot" is just thier in-house "expert" and resident FFL license holder.
I've decided that IF I can get an audience with the owner of the company (unfortunately, he is a family friend) I am going to explain why seven auction lot items were not as vigorously bid on, and ultimately sold for less than if I had participated in those sales.

swathdiver
February 9, 2013, 02:44 AM
...Then he proceeded to grab the .45 by the barrel and beat it against the table, trying to force the .455 magazine in. He finally got it almost all the way in, after bending the lanyard loop almost flat and bending the magazine lip. "See", he smirked, "it fits."

I just turned away. He had ruined a $150-200 magazine just to prove to me that he was an expert! Of course it was his magazine, but ....

The man suffers from too much pride. It's the downfall of most men.

4speed
February 10, 2013, 07:28 PM
I witnessed a so-called "expert" (long-time gun auctioneer and FFL holder) pick up EVERY single-action revolver meant for bid (several new, many others like new -or- collectible) and casually "spin" the cylinder (at the podium,during the auctioneering,-for all to see!-, mind you), as if he couldn't help him-self but to repeatably hear and feel the rapid-fire click-click-click of the hand thrumming across the ratchet.

Gee! Isn't that how they do it in the movies? LOL

zimmerstutzen
February 10, 2013, 09:19 PM
It isn't just firearms. I have seen auctioneers and bidders ruin fine pieces of equipment by idiotic bone head things.

I have seen bidders break keys off in ignition by turning it the wrong way, I saw an auctioneer ruin a bench top lathe by flipping it on when the cutting tool was jambed into the chuck. Saw an assistant auctioneer try to put a Remmie bolt into a Winchester action.

Worst was when I saw a guy close a hood on a car without lowering the prop that holds the hood open.

My grandmother had a great little saying. If it isn't yours, don't touch it.

Gatofeo
February 11, 2013, 12:40 AM
You'd think an auctioneer would have more sense. I guess not.
Seems that everywhere you turn, everyone's become an expert in something or another. I never liked the term, "expert" as it implies someone who knows everything about a subject. No one does, nor will they ever.

I could never work in a gun store.
The public is largely idiots when it comes to firearms.
The worst is the used-gun rack in any gun store, if it's readily available to the public. The bump guns into each other removing them, jack back bolts, slides, pumps and levers like a mountain lion was about to pounce, and fiddle with everything they can get their grubby fingers into.
Then they bump gun together getting it back into the rack and go onto the next one.
And all the while, they brag about their groups, elk they shot at 1,000 yards, how grandad had an old Luger that he got off Ghoering and a host of other nonsense.
It's idiots like this that are getting our guns taken away. The media loves to show these types as "typical" of gun owners, and anti-gunners believe it.

And worse than a gun store are the idiots I run into here in the remote desert. Blamming away with an SKS or AR15 and giving that Slackjaw grin. They leave a mess of broken bottles, shot up car batteries and refrigerators, and steel cases all over the landscape.
Don't leave many holes in the target, though.

Snaggletooth
February 11, 2013, 01:58 AM
EX is a has been and a Spurt is a drip under pressure

zimmerstutzen
February 11, 2013, 12:22 PM
Most true "experts" have the realization that there is so much more to learn, that they do not even consider themselves experts.

Any time some one that knows more than I do about a subject wants to share his wisdom, I am all ears.

CraigC
February 11, 2013, 02:01 PM
Most true "experts" have the realization that there is so much more to learn, that they do not even consider themselves experts.

Any time some one that knows more than I do about a subject wants to share his wisdom, I am all ears.
I agree! If you're comfortable and content in what you think you know, you're no expert on anything but killing time. We should all strive to be better and smarter today than we were yesterday. Unfortunately, thirst for knowledge seems to be an uncommon thing.

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