Any need to know information before loading brass jacketed FMJ?


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BeerSleeper
February 10, 2013, 08:08 AM
I recently bought 2k pieces of 230gn. FMJ in .45
I didn't realize until I got home with them that I think they have a brass jacket.
It is made by Armscor, and has a brass color to it, and the sticker on the outside of the box say "brass", so I think these have a brass jacket to them.

Anything different about loading these as compared to a common copper fmj bullet? If the brass jacket is harder than a copper jacket, when working up a load, is it still ok to work up to the same maximum listed for regular copper fmj, or should I stop sooner than that (I usually find a load I like before I get to max charges anyway...)

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steveno
February 10, 2013, 08:24 AM
I bought a couple of bags(100) of Remington 230 grain fmj in their packaging. one bag was the normal looking bullet and the other was brass colored. I'm wondering why Remington made the change with the jacket material? the only thing I can figure out on my own is that since it appears to be the same material as their brass jacketed hollow points is to start using a more common material in their handgun bullets. other than that I have no idea. I just loaded them the same as the regular bullet jacket

ReloaderFred
February 10, 2013, 12:01 PM
I've found no difference between them. In fact, I swage bullets with brass jackets and they work fine.

Hope this helps.

Fred

bds
February 10, 2013, 12:19 PM
Been shooting Montana Gold and Remington Golden Saber "brass jacketed" bullets for decades without issues.

You may need to adjust your powder charges a bit compared to copper jacketed bullets but I have found that I end up using comparable charges when I did my powder work ups.

BeerSleeper
February 10, 2013, 12:34 PM
I've read forum posts on the internet in general that suggest they may need +/- .1 or .2 grains to get the same velocity.

Having not a chrony, I suppose I'll not worry about it.

I didn't know if I should stay a tenth or two below max charges or not. Probably moot point anyway, as I usually find a batch I like before I get that far anyway.

Thanks for the input.

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