British Muzzle Loading Revolvers


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MikeJackmin
February 11, 2013, 11:22 AM
http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2013/02/10/muzzle-loading-revolver-conversions-in-the-uk/

One the one hand, it's sad. On the other hand, I want one.

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zimmerstutzen
February 11, 2013, 01:01 PM
Unless it is a pepper box, revolvers are not muzzle loaders.

BCRider
February 11, 2013, 01:20 PM
SHHHHHH! Don't say that too loudly. Their lawmaker/politicians might hear you.... :D

From some other posts here and on other forums I gather Uberti or Pietta or maybe both make "retro" conversions and sell them in Britain of the 1873 set up with cap n' ball cylinders or maybe they are .452 size cylinders. Either way it got around the laws and qualify as "muzzle loaders".

pohill
February 11, 2013, 01:49 PM
They're not breechloaders...

zimmerstutzen
February 11, 2013, 02:14 PM
There are guns that load from the muzzle, guns that load from the breech and those that load in between the breech and the muzzle The tweeners are cap and ball revolvers, the Hall, Greener, etc generally they load from the front of a moveable chamber.

Then they really don't want to know about this:

http://i672.photobucket.com/albums/vv85/longcaribiner/T2eC16RHJHoE9n3Ke-PmBQBbI-l6C60_57-1_zps5829d0d3.jpg
(center fire!)

DaveP (UK)
February 11, 2013, 03:43 PM
I have heard the view that C&B revolvers are a bit of a legislative oversight, but we're not planning to complain... :D
I believe they qualify legally as muzzle loaders because they load from the front, using a ramrod, of sorts, and they dont take what we call fixed ammunition - bullet, powder and primer in one package. Not too much firepower!

I you want another cylinder it would need to be listed on your firearms certificate, and its just about impossible to come up with an acceptable reason to own one. If you wrecked the one you have you would need to surrender it before getting a replacement.

BCRider
February 11, 2013, 04:32 PM
Dave, it must be interesting to watch any sort of speed matches where a reload is required. I have this mental image of a guy running through an IPSC or IDPA like course with a rolling too cart like reloading "bench" being pushed along to handle the reloads. And the timer using a wrist watch to catch the final time.... :D

Sorry I know I'm making fun of a poor situation but when we can't do anything much about it all we've got is our sense of humor to fall back on. Because if we didn't laugh we'd all be crying into our pints.

pohill
February 11, 2013, 04:33 PM
They don't load from the breech and technically they don't load from the muzzle, but they load more from the muzzle than the breech. They use a centerfire cap but they actually use "unconventional ammo", so they can't be considered "centerfire". It might only be a concern to hunters who use cap and ball revolvers during muzzle loading season.

Mk VII
February 11, 2013, 04:43 PM
The IPSC crowd mostly shifted over to 10/22s to keep doing that sort of stuff. While we do have front-stuffers shooting alongside pistol-calibre carbines etc. in the standard exercises they slow things right down with the slow reload and the numerous misfires and they don't get used very much.

DaveP (UK)
February 11, 2013, 05:16 PM
And lets not forget that some of us enjoy our long barreled revolvers, and there are timed events such as turning targets for them.
Snag is, you have to buy an LBR in order to find out if you like it - its not legal to let another club member use yours. I doubt I'll ever get round to it.

BCRider: after reading your comment I started to wonder how CAS afficionados get by over here. Numbers are growing apparently.
I did find this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzdXgOnkCuQ
Have to say, I'm not deeply moved...

FreddyKruger
February 11, 2013, 09:03 PM
in Aust, BP pistols are under the same class as centrefire pistols up to .38. It used to be like in some US states where you dont need anything apart from somewhere for them to post it to, but not any more :( if it was still like that i would probably have a safe full of them!

rdstrain49
February 11, 2013, 11:52 PM
For $1,330.93 I think I'll pass

kBob
February 12, 2013, 08:41 AM
Well I am dissappointed. From the title I was expecting to hear that someone was making Kerrs, Adams, etc.

-kBob

BHP FAN
February 12, 2013, 12:18 PM
I want a Tranter...

philuk44
February 12, 2013, 02:58 PM
Not wanting to hijack the thread but I also thought it was going to be about classic British revolvers.
So, and in response to BHP Fan's post I thought I'd share this:

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r61/philuk44/Trantercopy.jpg

Yes, that is gold plate - silver on the cylinder.
Any marks on the finish are probably just drool... :p
Apologies for the poor picture quality - just taken on my tablet.

Not mine I'm afraid - one of our club members is a firearms dealer. Did get to fondle it though..... :D

Phil

Mk VII
February 12, 2013, 04:16 PM
The idea of an Adams was canvassed at one point, but there weren't enough people here who wanted one badly enough to pay the premium, plus it only holds five not six so most competitions would be beyond it.

BHP FAN
February 12, 2013, 07:37 PM
I had the chance to buy one, [I think it was an Adams] almost forty years ago at an antique shop in Plymouth, England for two hundred bucks....I was fifty bucks short.

BHP FAN
February 12, 2013, 07:41 PM
I do have an 1888 ''British Bulldog'' [more likely Belgian] .38, and a Webley and Scott ''War Finish'' .38-200, and an Albion made ''Enfield'', also in .38.

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