30-06 for a 13 year old?


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alfon99
February 13, 2013, 07:15 PM
Hey, I'm getting my first centerfire rifle and I would like to know what do you think about getting a 30-06. Recoil is my main concern. I've been shooting .22's since I'm 3 and when I was 6 I started shooting a 16 gauge shotgun my grandma gave me (yes, my grandma) and I can handle the recoil with no problem. The thing is that I'm not sure how stronger the 30-06 recoil is compared to the 16 gauge. Maybe a recoil pad would help? I will be hunting wild boar, It's full of them where I live.

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Adk Mike
February 13, 2013, 07:21 PM
I shoot reduced loaded 30-06 all the time. I shoot a lot and have no interest in factory loads. Cast suits me fine. I'd bet they would do great on hogs. I say the 06 is they way to go.

Isaac-1
February 13, 2013, 07:22 PM
I don't own any 16 gauge shotguns, just 12 and 20 gauge, but I would say a typical 30-06 will have a felt recoil in the same ballpark (depending on how powerful of load the shotgun had).

p.s. keep in mind 13 is just when the typical teen age growth spurt tends to start so if 30-06 is too much this year, there is plenty of time to grow into it.

radiotom
February 13, 2013, 07:24 PM
How big are you?

ihctractor
February 13, 2013, 07:26 PM
First of all, you've got a cool Grandma!!!!
The 30-06 does have a decent recoil, especially in a light weight gun, but if you've been shooting that 16 gauge without issue then the 30-06 can be managed. Buy a gun with a recoil pad and start with light bullets (125 gr.) and maybe even the Remington "managed recoil" rounds till you get used to the gun and get it sighted in, then step up to a 150 gr. or 180 gr. soft point for hogs. Recoil always hurts more at the bench but when you're standing and shooting at a running animal, even the hardest hitting guns are seldom felt or heard by the shooter.
You won't always be 13 and the 30-06 is probably the most versatile round anyone of any age can own. Get a decent one and you'll be able give to your grandson someday!
Happy hunting!

OptimusPrime
February 13, 2013, 07:26 PM
I got a recoil pad on my .30-06 and it really helped me at the bench, I'd recommend them. It does add an inch to the stock, so that might be a lot to a 13 year old arm, I don't know.

RmB
February 13, 2013, 07:29 PM
Like others said, how big are you?
And you should be just fine. I was shooting 30-30s and 30-06s long before 13

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 07:30 PM
I'm 1.8 meters tall (5.9 ft) and I weigh 60 kg (around 132 lbs)

radiotom
February 13, 2013, 07:32 PM
Same size as my woman, who can handle a 12 gauge, you'll be fine.

longknife12
February 13, 2013, 07:34 PM
My sons first centerfire was a 30-30.....age about 12-13.....within a year he had graduated to a 06. He handled it with no problems. I think you will be fine.
Dan

OptimusPrime
February 13, 2013, 07:34 PM
I take it back, anyone who measures in meters and kilos can't handle any recoil at all. ;)
Just kidding.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 07:44 PM
I live in uruguay, south america. Here we use metric system, Had to search n the web the weight in lbs! lol

Sharps-shooter
February 13, 2013, 07:47 PM
At your size you should have no trouble with a 7.62x63mm (or 30-06 as we call it around here).

I personally would rather have a shooting vest with a padded shoulder (or a folded up flannel shirt) rather than a recoil pad on the gun. Your mileage (or kilometerage) may vary.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 07:57 PM
I may be getting it in 2-3 weeks, Me and my dad liked the remington 700 bdl. What do you think?

longknife12
February 13, 2013, 08:03 PM
The 700 is a proven item.Good luck.
Dan

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 08:03 PM
Depends on the rifle, look for a rifle of reasonable weight with a good recoil pad and fits your shoulder properly and the 30-06 is nothing too harsh. Female friends of mine can handle my Savage 110 with no problems, in fact a couple of them really like it. Avoid featherweights and hard rubber pads they can really sting. How large are the boar in your area? A 30-06 is alot of gun and is often a harsh overkill for game under the 150kg range. The recoil of a 30-06 cannot be compared to a shotgun, rifles might have less push but are more snappy. Avoid the new Remingtons, if you want a 700 get a pre 2007 model take it from an ex Remington fan.

Sam1911
February 13, 2013, 08:07 PM
If you use good form, and especially if you begin your practice standing, rather than shooting from a shooting bench, you should be ok. A good recoil pad, reduced-recoil ammunition, a padded vest or several layers of shirts, or even a recoil-reducing stock (if you can obtain those) will all help you manage the recoil.

The big thing is to hold the rifle tightly and hang on for the ride. Don't try to shy away from the rifle or hold it away from your shoulder! The gun is going to move. It won't physically injure you. The most important thing to do is remember to focus on your sights and press the trigger slowly. That will put the bullet where you want it to go. If you focus on that, the recoil isn't any big deal.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 08:10 PM
About the ear and eye protection, my dad never wear them and he used to shot a .357 mag revolver, many 30-06's etc. and his hearing is such that he wakes up for even a spider walking in the floor. But I guess It's just one case. I better not take the risk!

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 08:13 PM
Oh one thing I forgot to mention, if you are stepping up in recoil make sure to get a scope with adequate eye relief, I had a 7mm Rem Mag years ago that busted my nose and cut me over the eye because I had to be right up on the glass to see through it. Don't make that mistake it hurts.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 08:16 PM
Kachok, I must be pretty unlucky to get a "new" remington 700 here in uruguay. In the third world everything arrives 10 years later! lol

PSL650m
February 13, 2013, 08:19 PM
I don't know much as to 30-06 recoil in a bolt gun; I shoot an M-1. But since you have been shooting in general for a while, I figure you should not have much problem with it. I have not heard anything bad about the 700, but that is all that means. As mentioned earlier, how big are these hogs; you might be using a cannon to sink a rowboat.

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 08:20 PM
What other calibers are common/popular in your part of the world?

Reloadron
February 13, 2013, 08:22 PM
Here is what I would suggest. Try to beg or borrow a 30-06 bolt gun and shoot it several times. If it feels comfortable after 10 to 15 rounds then by all means look for a 30-06 rifle. However, if you find the recoil a little punishing after several shots I would start thinking about a .308 rifle. The trick is to try to find a rifle you can try before you commit to a 30-06 as your own.

Just My Take....
Ron

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 08:27 PM
They are 100+ kg. In some cases they may weigh 200kg or even more! So yes, they are bigger here probably more than in the U.S.

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 08:33 PM
That is some pretty decent sized pigs, not huge but big enough. They killed a 353kg boar a few miles from my house three years ago. Anything reaching that size is where the 30-06 shines with it's superb 180gr bullets, for 100-200kg range you can use a whole host of smaller calibers if you like but the 06 is still a solid choice. A friend of mine has killed several in the 150-200kg range with a 270 Win he swears by it.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 08:35 PM
Kachok, the .308 is popular here. also the 25-06, but it is mainly used in a kind of deer found here, because it is not the best option for the wild boar, specially here, the hogs are bigger than in many places. So I think the best alternative would be the .308, if the 30-06 recoil is too strong.

Tempest 455
February 13, 2013, 08:40 PM
My son started shooting my M1 Garand when he was 11.

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 08:41 PM
Yeah the 25-06 is not my first choice, not to say it could not do the job but for tough game like that I like larger calibers with heavier bullets. 308s are great too, I have one of those as well, a bit less recoil and still plenty adequate for any hog with the right bullet IMHO.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 08:42 PM
Wow! 353kg? that's huge! I wish I could find one of these!

allaroundhunter
February 13, 2013, 08:42 PM
alfon,,

You might find the recoil of the .30-06 to be too much, IME.... the '06 has noticeably more felt recoil than any shotgun round that I have fired short of a 12 3" slug.

The .308 is more manageable, and it is another caliber that you won't grow out of. It is plenty for hogs as well.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 08:43 PM
Yes, In fact, any caliber "can" do the job. Here where I live people shoots boar with the first thing they have in hands!

MacTech
February 13, 2013, 08:54 PM
If you handload/reload, the '06 is one of the most versatile chamberings out there, from powderpuff loads that have as much recoil as a .22 Magnum, to shoulder-busting thumpers

For a nice, easy shooting plinking load with just a tad more recoil than a .22 Mag, I use this recipe;
Large rifle primer, 17.9 grains of IMR Trail Boss propellant, and a 130 grain Hornady jacketed soft point bullet

No recoil worth speaking of, and a relatively quiet, as center fire rifle cartridges go, muzzle report, strictly a short range load, I wouldn't push it past 50 yards

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 08:59 PM
Something to think about though, the largest hog killed in this region was just shy of 500kg and killed with a single well placed shot from a 7mm-08. Don't let macho talk fool you a well placed shot from a sissy kicker trumps a marginal shot from a 338 Win Mag any day. Accuracy is king, if you feel like the 06 recoil could cause you to flinch it is far better to shoot a lighter kicking cartridge. Only way to find out is to try one which I highly recommend before you go out and buy it if possible. I have been shooting high powered rifles since I a small child, now I can shoot 30-06 until my wallet hurts no problem, but in general I still prefer to hunt with my light kicking rifles unless I am targeting trophy sized large hogs.

ridgerunner1965
February 13, 2013, 09:05 PM
the recoil between 308 and 06 is not that different.recoil is more mind over matter anyway.get the gun you want and learn to load and shoot it.the larger 30 cal bullets, say 180 to 220 grn can rattle your teeth.125 to 150 grn bullets seem to have less recoil.

a lot depends on the weight of the rifle.a nice cushion butt pad is nice as well.

if you dont have many choices get what you can and grow into it and learn how to make it work. like i said before recoil is a mental thing. it wont kill you, learn to ignore the physical pain and it will serve yu well.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 09:08 PM
You're right. I know a guy that sells guns, I may borrow him a 30-06 or maybe I can even get my rifle from him, he lets people try his guns before buying. And he's a friend of mine so maybe I can try it there, if it kicks to much, then a .308 will be the way to go.

Kachok
February 13, 2013, 09:15 PM
Right on, let us know how that works out for you :)

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 09:18 PM
I'll post it when I get it. Together with some pics of the new rifle!

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 09:19 PM
Also thank you all for the responses!

wrs840
February 13, 2013, 09:34 PM
I'm fairly certain your concern will not be that you're shooting 30-06, but rather how frequently you're shooting 30-06.

.35 Rem out of a 336 makes me start to say "ouch" if I shoot a dozen rounds in ten minutes, and then my shoulder feels it for a couple days. It's cumulative and frequency-dependent... For me anyway...

rondog
February 13, 2013, 10:02 PM
.30-06 will serve you well, and you can handle it no problem. If that's what you want, then go for it. I have no idea what the shooting sports are like there, so I'd recommend you base your decision on what kind of ammo you can get most often.

dubbleA
February 13, 2013, 10:06 PM
Something to think about though, the largest hog killed in this region was just shy of 500kg and killed with a single well placed shot from a 7mm-08.[ Don't let macho talk fool you a well placed shot from a sissy kicker trumps a marginal shot from a 338 Win Mag any day. Accuracy is king, if you feel like the 06 recoil could cause you to flinch it is far better to shoot a lighter kicking cartridge. Only way to find out is to try one which I highly recommend before you go out and buy it if possible. I have been shooting high powered rifles since I a small child, now I can shoot 30-06 until my wallet hurts no problem, but in general I still prefer to hunt with my light kicking rifles unless I am targeting trophy sized large hogs.


Was this one of those domestic pigs that are turned loose from a pen and then claimed as "hogzilla the maneater" killed in the wild?

Please post a picture or 3. Surely a news link of this exist on the internets.:rolleyes:

Art Eatman
February 13, 2013, 10:06 PM
My first '06, I was a meter and .75; maybe 60 kilos wringing wet. Stick out my tongue and turn sideways, I could imitate a zipper.

It wasn't the recoil as recoil; it was the steel butt plate on that 1917 Enfield that kept my skinny shoulder blue most of the summer. :D

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 10:15 PM
steel butt plate... ouch! that must kinda hurt!

Art Eatman
February 13, 2013, 10:24 PM
I rigged up a padding with an old bath towel, which made life a lot better. :) Being summertime, I was usually bare-footed in Levis, or with maybe a tee-shirt. Can't really let a little discomfort interrupt good times...

Brian Williams
February 13, 2013, 10:47 PM
I would be more concerned with ammo availability over the recoil. Is 308 or 30-06 more available? Which costs more?

Boattale
February 13, 2013, 10:59 PM
A .30-06 Remington 700 BDL for a first centerfire rifle. I can tell you one thing for certain. It's going to be a long time before you need anything different. Enjoy it young man, you'll be fine with it.

I gave a .30-06 to my 11 year old grandson this fall. He's big for his age and has been hunting for a while with a single shot .223 and was saving his money for a 760 Remington. I just happened to have one. He's not bothered by the recoil, I doubt you will be either, especially when there's a pig in front of you.

alfon99
February 13, 2013, 11:26 PM
Brian, both 30-06 and .308 are very popular here, but 30-06 costs a little bit more. A 20 round Hornady SST box in 30-06 costs 63$ and one in .308 costs 60$ the 30-06 is a bit more expensive, but I think I like it more than the .308. I don't know why because I never used it! lol

allaroundhunter
February 14, 2013, 12:32 AM
Holy cow... ammo sure is expensive down there...

sixgunner455
February 14, 2013, 04:44 AM
For that kind of money, I surely wouldn't care about recoil, because the gun wouldn't get shot enough for it to matter!

My 13yo is quite a bit smaller than you are. He is not able to handle that level of recoil, or hold up a rifle that would make it tolerable. That said, I think that if you want to shoot it, you will figure out a way to make it work. My son has a number of other choices in firearms, so we went a different route.

Pain is pain. It is not mental. I hear a lot of people espousing the opinion that recoil is mental, and I can't imagine what would make them think that. Recoil can leave bruises or worse. That isn't mental, it's not a figment of your imagination, it's a physical reality. Proper technique and mental attitude can go a long way toward mitigating the effects of recoil, but they do not turn the physical reality of it into a mental exercise. That said, recoil isn't something to be terribly concerned about in normal kicking rifles, but it is something that must be dealt with.

Besides potential injuries (bruising up to separated shoulders and nerve damage, in the wrong combination of shooter/weapon), pain also causes flinching, which destroys accuracy, so if it hurts, don't just say you handle it and put up with it. Figure out a way to make it not hurt. Technique-wise, hold it tight to your shoulder, inboard of the joint. Recoil pads, worn or on the gun, can help. Lighter loads in the same caliber, or a lighter caliber, or a heavier gun, are the other things people usually do to find a tolerable level of recoil.

If you end up with something besides a .30-06, don't worry about it. I'm a lot older and heavier guy than you, and I rarely shoot anything that kicks that hard because I just don't like it. I can shoot them, but I get a lot more enjoyment out of "sissy-kickers", as Kachok terms them.

Good luck!

Kachok
February 14, 2013, 07:20 AM
Was this one of those domestic pigs that are turned loose from a pen and then claimed as "hogzilla the maneater" killed in the wild?

Please post a picture or 3. Surely a news link of this exist on the internets.:rolleyes:
Wrong one, you are thinking of the one killed in north Alabama, that was a canned hunt with a dommestic pig. The record I am talking about was the wild one killed in Fayette county GA.
Here is a link http://www.gon.com/article.php?id=1017

Kachok
February 14, 2013, 07:24 AM
Brian, both 30-06 and .308 are very popular here, but 30-06 costs a little bit more. A 20 round Hornady SST box in 30-06 costs 63$ and one in .308 costs 60$ the 30-06 is a bit more expensive, but I think I like it more than the .308. I don't know why because I never used it! lol
DANG! Is it legal to reload there? The 30-06 is an easy cartridge to reload for.

Russ Jackson
February 14, 2013, 08:03 AM
My 16ga bolt action shot gun is about the same as my 06. Go ahead and shoot it. It always seems when you shoot at paper it hurts more than when shooting at a deer. Why is that. Same thing with a shotgun you never feel the kick when shooting a duck or geese but when you shoot a can you do......lol

alsaqr
February 14, 2013, 08:35 AM
You have a neat Grandma. You will do fine shooting a .30-06.

My son was average size his age when he started shooting a .30-06 at age 13. The gun was a sporterized lightweigh 1903 Springfield with the stock shortened by 1". My wife made him a shooting shirt with built in recoil pad. The ammo we used was WWII surplus ball and AP.

Start out using reduced loads and see how you handle the recoil. Then graduate to full force loads. My son never had any problem with the recoil of full force .30-06 loads. He is now 43 years old and still uses that gun. The sawed off piece of stock was glued back on the gun.

Sav .250
February 14, 2013, 08:43 AM
I believe they make a "reduced" load for the 30-06. Big help in cutting down on the re-coil.

alfon99
February 14, 2013, 09:33 AM
DANG! Is it legal to reload there? The 30-06 is an easy cartridge to reload for.
Yes, reloading is legal, and with the prices like this it's probably a good option. That way I can start shooting light loads and when I get used to it I can start with the full force loads.

TenDriver
February 14, 2013, 09:56 AM
I think you will be fine with the .30-06. Most of the newer production synthetic stock rifles all have THICK recoil pads on them. I've let 9 year old shoot my Marlin XL-7 in .270 with no problems. That recoil is a little less than the -06, but close enough.

You also have numerous bullet weight options in .30-06. I've found 150 gr loads recoil to be mild to moderate, but 220 gr load recoil to be harsh.

For what it's worth, I have a friend whose 13 year old son shoots his 300Win Mag. He's an average size kid and scared of recoil to boot. He manned up to the 300 on his own over the summer and decided to hunt with it over the winter.

alfon99
February 14, 2013, 10:40 AM
I think you will be fine with the .30-06. Most of the newer production synthetic stock rifles all have THICK recoil pads on them. I've let 9 year old shoot my Marlin XL-7 in .270 with no problems. That recoil is a little less than the -06, but close enough.

You also have numerous bullet weight options in .30-06. I've found 150 gr loads recoil to be mild to moderate, but 220 gr load recoil to be harsh.

For what it's worth, I have a friend whose 13 year old son shoots his 300Win Mag. He's an average size kid and scared of recoil to boot. He manned up to the 300 on his own over the summer and decided to hunt with it over the winter.
Well, If a 9 year old shoots a .270 with no problems I think I'll have no problem with a 30-06.

dubbleA
February 14, 2013, 11:36 AM
Kachok, thanks for the hog link. No doubt a huge hog but unlikely it was a true feral hog in my opinion.

cal30_sniper
February 14, 2013, 11:56 AM
Alfon,

When I was 13, I was 165cm and less than 45kg. I started out with a Ishapore 2A Enfield in .308 with a steel buttplate. I graduated up to a .308 Savage 11F (very light, with a hard rubber butt pad) about a year later. Recoil never has been an issue for me. 10+ years later, and I am still the same height and weight as you are at 13. I shoot a .30-06 in a Savage 110 quite often. It's a non-issue, especially if you're only going through 1 box or so in a sitting. That being said, if I want to shoot several boxes of ammo in a day, I grab the 7x57 or 6.5x55. If I'm going to hunt deer or hogs, I grab the 7x57 or 6.5x55. If I want to plink, I grab the .223. The '06 does start to hurt after 20-30 rounds on the bench or prone. From sitting or offhand, you really don't even feel it.

I don't know how it is down in Uruguay, but if ammo and rifles are available, you might look into a sporterized Mauser built on your indigenous .30-06, the 7.65x53mm. That'd be a neat bit of heritage to take hunting, and would kick a bit less than the '06. If you can find 7x57, its an even better choice. Light recoil, usually very accurate, and one heck of a killing round. That'd be my suggestion, as long as ammo is available. I've tried a lot of calibers, but that's the one I keep coming back to.

alfon99
February 14, 2013, 12:15 PM
Yes, I have no doubt that the 7x57mm mauser is better for my age, but I don't want to spend much money in "graduating". That's why I would like more the 30-06, or a .308.

alfon99
February 14, 2013, 12:16 PM
Alfon,

When I was 13, I was 165cm and less than 45kg. I started out with a Ishapore 2A Enfield in .308 with a steel buttplate. I graduated up to a .308 Savage 11F (very light, with a hard rubber butt pad) about a year later. Recoil never has been an issue for me. 10+ years later, and I am still the same height and weight as you are at 13. I shoot a .30-06 in a Savage 110 quite often. It's a non-issue, especially if you're only going through 1 box or so in a sitting. That being said, if I want to shoot several boxes of ammo in a day, I grab the 7x57 or 6.5x55. If I'm going to hunt deer or hogs, I grab the 7x57 or 6.5x55. If I want to plink, I grab the .223. The '06 does start to hurt after 20-30 rounds on the bench or prone. From sitting or offhand, you really don't even feel it.

I don't know how it is down in Argentina, but if ammo and rifles are available, you might look into a sporterized Mauser built on your indigenous .30-06, the 7.65x53mm. That'd be a neat bit of heritage to take hunting, and would kick a bit less than the '06. If you can find 7x57, its an even better choice. Light recoil, usually very accurate, and one heck of a killing round. That'd be my suggestion, as long as ammo is available. I've tried a lot of calibers, but that's the one I keep coming back to.
Yes, I have no doubt that the 7x57mm mauser is better for my age, but I don't want to spend much money in "graduating". That's why I would like more the 30-06, or a .308.

cal30_sniper
February 14, 2013, 01:05 PM
I wasn't saying it was better for your age, I was suggesting it's better all the way around for 95% of hunting situations, especially for a smaller guy.

For deer and hog sized game, the 7x57 delivers all the killing power you could ever desire, in a lighter package with less recoil. The 7x57 and .308 are near identical in what they can accomplish, with an edge to the 7x57 at longer ranges. The .30-06 has a bit more oomph, but is more often overkill than a necessary extra.

Now, if rifles and ammo in 7x57 are prohibitively expensive, I could see that as a viable reason to go .308 or .30-06. I'm just telling you that coming from a guy your size, I much prefer shooting the 6.5-7mm cartridges with 140-175 grn bullets than .30 caliber cartridges with 165-180 grn bullets. They do exactly the same job, just a lot more comfortably, and the rifles are usually more elegant to handle also.

HankR
February 14, 2013, 01:16 PM
Well, If a 9 year old shoots a .270 with no problems I think I'll have no problem with a 30-06.

I'd like to echo the "try before you buy". My son is 14, and probably about your size. He plays (american) football and considers himself a "tough guy". He won't admit it, but he much prefers to shoot his .243 over a 30-06. He will shoot the 30-06 (at targets), but doesn't hop up and beg to shoot it. It looks as if he is starting to cringe, almost flinch, before pulling the trigger on the '06 but not at all on the .243.

Truth be told, I'm 6 foot and too close to 200 lb for my liking, and I prefer the .243. I figure when he grows into the 30-06 I'll step down to the .243.... (not really, but I wouldn't spend the kind of money you're probably looking at w/ out trying it first. For hogs I'm guessing you're pretty close, I'd consider a levergun in 30-30?)

Your english is very good,

alfon99
February 14, 2013, 02:05 PM
I'd like to echo the "try before you buy". My son is 14, and probably about your size. He plays (american) football and considers himself a "tough guy". He won't admit it, but he much prefers to shoot his .243 over a 30-06. He will shoot the 30-06 (at targets), but doesn't hop up and beg to shoot it. It looks as if he is starting to cringe, almost flinch, before pulling the trigger on the '06 but not at all on the .243.

Truth be told, I'm 6 foot and too close to 200 lb for my liking, and I prefer the .243. I figure when he grows into the 30-06 I'll step down to the .243.... (not really, but I wouldn't spend the kind of money you're probably looking at w/ out trying it first. For hogs I'm guessing you're pretty close, I'd consider a levergun in 30-30?)

Your english is very good,
Yes, I guess I'll try before I buy. If the .30-06 recoil bothers me, then I guess I'll go for the .308 or .30-30 as you said, depends on the rifle.

H&Hhunter
February 14, 2013, 03:01 PM
Alfon

I have tewo daughters one is 16 the other is 13 now they have both been shooting .308 and .30-06 since they were about 10 years old. No problems and they've both killed big hogs, deer, antelope and elk with their rifles with no issues at all.

The key is a nice soft recoil pad IMO.

Kachok
February 14, 2013, 03:50 PM
Kachok, thanks for the hog link. No doubt a huge hog but unlikely it was a true feral hog in my opinion.
There is no such thing as a "true" feral hog if you think about it, that is like saying a purebred mutt. They all have mixed blood from several different strain of boar and escaped domestic pigs as well, that one looks born wild there are no signs of ear, teeth or tail cutting. Pigs like to bite each others ears and tails off when crowded in a pen so that is pretty standard stuff for farm raised animals.

dcarch
February 14, 2013, 08:17 PM
Alfon99, first, let me say that I am very impressed by the maturity of your answers, as well as the quality of your English. Many native English speakers could take a lesson (or three) from you. Second, let me welcome you to The High Road, which is, in my humble opinion, the best firearms forum on the planet. I have picked up more useful information here than anywhere else online. Period. With regards to the rifle, I should think a 30'06 would be fine for you. I would, however, as you yourself suggested, testfire one first to see if you like it and can deal with the recoil impulse. Finally, another option to consider might be getting a recoil reduction pad to aid in mitigating the perceived recoil. I don't know what the market's like down there in Uruguay, but were I in your position, I would also consider looking at military surplus bolt action rifles too... they can be excellent deals, and the iron sights would be a big plus for hog hunting. However, as I previously stated, I don't know what the market is like down there. Anyhow, good luck with your future firearm, and, of course, welcome to THR!

Deer_Freak
February 14, 2013, 09:57 PM
One thing is certain if the 30/06 is to much for you by 16 you will be able to handle the 30/06. It's not like you won't be able to handle the gun in a couple years. When you are shooting game you will not notice the recoil.

alfon99
February 14, 2013, 11:46 PM
Alfon99, first, let me say that I am very impressed by the maturity of your answers, as well as the quality of your English. Many native English speakers could take a lesson (or three) from you. Second, let me welcome you to The High Road, which is, in my humble opinion, the best firearms forum on the planet. I have picked up more useful information here than anywhere else online. Period. With regards to the rifle, I should think a 30'06 would be fine for you. I would, however, as you yourself suggested, testfire one first to see if you like it and can deal with the recoil impulse. Finally, another option to consider might be getting a recoil reduction pad to aid in mitigating the perceived recoil. I don't know what the market's like down there in Uruguay, but were I in your position, I would also consider looking at military surplus bolt action rifles too... they can be excellent deals, and the iron sights would be a big plus for hog hunting. However, as I previously stated, I don't know what the market is like down there. Anyhow, good luck with your future firearm, and, of course, welcome to THR! Thanks! I had the luck to be taught english since I was very little and as you can see, It was very useful for me. Or else I wouldn't be in this forum! I was surprised by how fast I got the answers. In some you've got to wait days for only one! About the military surplus... there are none here. Look at this link http://www.lr21.com.uy/politica/286664-ejercito-devuelve-fusiles-a-eeuu I know you will not understand anything, but It talks about thousands of m1's (and other stuff) that Uruguay just gave back to the US after being stored for decades... So thats where they go. I guess military surplus is not an option!

Inebriated
February 15, 2013, 12:03 AM
.30-06 will be just fine! If you're shooting a reduced-power load, you'll likely have no issues with recoil. If you have to fire factory ammo, then stick to 150 or 165 grain loads. I'm not saying you couldn't handle heavier loads, just that it's generally good practice to start with the lightest load, and work up.


Also, when you're hunting, recoil is the last thing you'll notice. As long as you can stand a few practice shots to see where you're hits are, I've got no doubt that you'll be happy with .30-06.

Oh, and I'm sure you're aware, but if not, form will do more as far as recoil management than a recoil pad ever will.

H&Hhunter
February 15, 2013, 12:06 AM
Kachok, thanks for the hog link. No doubt a huge hog but unlikely it was a true feral hog in my opinion.

doubbleA,

The definition of a "feral" animal is a once domestic animal that has gone wild. So all feral hogs will be of mixed domestic genes. I think you are mistaking the term feral for wild as in a euro or Russian boar of which there are few if any running wild in the State of Texas or anywhere else there are hogs running wild in America. The only place you are apt to find true wild Euro boars in America is behind a high fence. While I've seen many hogs that have heavy Euro genetics if they've been loose for more than generation there is huge chance that they've interbred with once domestic ferals.

alfon99
February 15, 2013, 10:10 AM
Hey, about the rifle, there's a friend of mine that sells a springfield M1903 chambered for the 30-06 round. The thing is that Im not sure how a modern scope could be mounted on a springfield. What do you think?

aka108
February 15, 2013, 10:53 AM
Alfon99--Get any high caliber you want, 30-06 or more. Don't mount a recoil pad to the rifle whatever it is. Waste of money unless the pad comes with the rifle. What you need to get is a "Past" recoil shield that you wear on you sholder either over you shirt or under you shirt I have used the Past shield for over 25 years (same one) and you can shoot anything all day long and not go home sore or bruised. I shoot a lot of 303, 308, 30-06 and 7.65 Argentine and all of these in a bolt action rifle will cause you some pain against a bare sholder. Use the Past shield and they all become mild. The Past shield run in the mid 20 USD range price wise.

alfon99
February 15, 2013, 11:10 AM
Alfon99--Get any high caliber you want, 30-06 or more. Don't mount a recoil pad to the rifle whatever it is. Waste of money unless the pad comes with the rifle. What you need to get is a "Past" recoil shield that you wear on you sholder either over you shirt or under you shirt I have used the Past shield for over 25 years (same one) and you can shoot anything all day long and not go home sore or bruised. I shoot a lot of 303, 308, 30-06 and 7.65 Argentine and all of these in a bolt action rifle will cause you some pain against a bare sholder. Use the Past shield and they all become mild. The Past shield run in the mid 20 USD range price wise.
You're right. I'll see if I get one or who knows if I can make one homemade?

dubbleA
February 15, 2013, 11:25 AM
Quote:
Kachok, thanks for the hog link. No doubt a huge hog but unlikely it was a true feral hog in my opinion.

doubbleA,

The definition of a "feral" animal is a once domestic animal that has gone wild. So all feral hogs will be of mixed domestic genes. I think you are mistaking the term feral for wild as in a euro or Russian boar of which there are few if any running wild in the State of Texas or anywhere else there are hogs running wild in America. The only place you are apt to find true wild Euro boars in America is behind a high fence. While I've seen many hogs that have heavy Euro genetics if they've been loose for more than generation there is huge chance that they've interbred with once domestic ferals.


Yes I chose a wrong word. Here in Texas the word wild and feral are used interchangeably. What I meant to say is free ranging hog that is one that is not raised and fed out in a pen and left to rome.

Hogs in the wild have a tough life, they just dont grow into these humongous freaks without human intervention such as castrating the boarsand endless feed supplies.
Have a family that has a helicopter business and one of the things we do is to erradicate hogs from the air. Have probablly killed 10's of thousands of feral hogs, have flown many many miles and you just so dont see 1000lb hogs in the wild. The average adult hog killed is probably 120-150 lbs. Of course there are 300-400 lber's taken occasionally but not the norm.

longknife12
February 15, 2013, 01:01 PM
If you test fire a 03 rifle in 30-06, with a steel butt plate, due to the plate and 03 stock shape, there is going to be recoil.Please don't make your choice on this test. If possible, I'd also try a sporter.
Dan

H&Hhunter
February 15, 2013, 01:17 PM
The average adult hog killed is probably 120-150 lbs. Of course there are 300-400 lber's taken occasionally but not the norm

My observation as well after having killed hundreds of wild hogs in Texas. There are places such as central California where they tend to get bigger due to weather and a better natural diet.

Art Eatman
February 15, 2013, 01:24 PM
Probably enough info for the OP to decide what's righteous for a 13-year-old girl. :)

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