Bipod Options for Ruger GSR


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baz
February 15, 2013, 10:42 AM
I'm mulling whether to get a bipod for my GSR, and if so, which one. I guess my first hurdle is understanding the rationale -- if there is one -- for a bipod on a scout style weapon. It seems to me that a bipod is almost diametrically opposed to the scout rifle concept. Among the benefits of the scout rifle concept is faster target acquisition -- offhand and against possibly moving targets. The scout rifle is not a sniper rifle. So why the bipod?

If I got one, it seems there is a choice between 6-9" models, and 9-13" models, and also swivel vs. fixed. I've no experience with bipods, so I may be wrong about this, but it seems to me that the higher model would be faster to get on target. E.g., again, I'm thinking of the "scout" on foot, who then needs to rapidly engage a target (as opposed to someone who has some time to set up a sniper hide). The swivel option sounds like it would add versatility also.

There is no question that a bipod would come in handy for any longer shots that might have to be made. But is it really a practical addition to a scout rifle? I'm interested more in utility in the field here than I am target shooting at a range.

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henschman
February 15, 2013, 11:57 AM
I definitely wouldn't put one on that type of rifle. It kind of defeats the purpose of having a light, short and handy rifle to haul out into the field. Do you know how to use a shooting sling? I'd put some sort of sling on it that can be used as a marksmanship aid, for those situations in which you need a little more precision than what an unsupported position can provide. A sling is nice because it doesn't add much weight/bulk, it doubles as a carry strap, and it can be used in any position.

baz
February 15, 2013, 12:56 PM
I've used a sling for offhand shooting on most all my rifles, at least the higher calibers. I do have a Ching Sling for the GSR, and just used it for the first time yesterday. I'm still working out a comfortable setting for the adjustments on the sling. I do agree that this seems to be the more natural appurtenance for a scout rifle than a bipod. But I see enough references or images to GSR's with bipods -- here's one here (posted in another THR thread about scout rifles):

http://i212.photobucket.com/albums/cc45/gcwaterski/GUNS/image_zpsd01e3c2c.jpg


that I have to wonder what I'm missing (and am hoping that someone who likes the bipod for a GSR will explain the utility of it for me).

gotboostvr
February 15, 2013, 01:11 PM
The bipods probably just there cause it looks nice holding up the rifle.

Although, I will say that I've always though a red dot on a 308 (or maybe a 338 fed!) bolt might be a great combination.

desidog
February 15, 2013, 01:14 PM
The nice thing about bipods is that they are removeable with little effort. I'd imagine the most use you'd get would be zeroing a sight, if you're not shooting off sandbags.

I have two, of both lengths mentioned in the OP, and swap them to whichever rifle i want to use...if i want to use them. That being said, I don't think i've ever put on on my scout rifle (a No.4 enfield with an XS rail.)

If you spot and stalk hunt, i'd say leave it at home, but if you were going to wait on your belly for the critters to come to you, then it might be a good thing to bring along (and put on the gun once in position, not for the walk in to your hunting spot).

Nasty
February 15, 2013, 04:59 PM
Ruger offers a nice $25 Harris knockoff bipod for them...convenient for range work, cleaning and such but agree that I would not take it in the field...no need with a proper sling setup.

langloisandy
February 15, 2013, 06:58 PM
I just use a backpack....works great.

Andy

chicharrones
February 15, 2013, 08:53 PM
I definitely wouldn't put one on that type of rifle. It kind of defeats the purpose of having a light, short and handy rifle to haul out into the field.

That's my thinking, too.

john wall
February 15, 2013, 09:36 PM
My Ruger Scout is so handy and easy to shoot with the factory irons, I reluctantly added glass to it. A bipod will not happen on this gun.

baz
February 16, 2013, 10:58 AM
The nice thing about bipods is that they are removeable with little effort. I'd imagine the most use you'd get would be zeroing a sight, if you're not shooting off sandbags.

I have two, of both lengths mentioned in the OP, and swap them to whichever rifle i want to use...if i want to use them. That being said, I don't think i've ever put on on my scout rifle (a No.4 enfield with an XS rail.)

If you spot and stalk hunt, i'd say leave it at home, but if you were going to wait on your belly for the critters to come to you, then it might be a good thing to bring along (and put on the gun once in position, not for the walk in to your hunting spot).While I agree with those are are saying "no," the fact that the are "removable with little effort" has me thinking I might just get one anyway. It wouldn't say on the rifle as a matter of course, but for the other possibilities mentioned -- sighting in, or an occasional shot where there is time to set up and take a shot from a rest -- having one to put on would be handy.

chicharrones
February 16, 2013, 05:26 PM
the fact that the are "removable with little effort" has me thinking I might just get one anyway.

A sling stud attached bipod that can be used on any rifle you own would be a worthy purchase in my opinion. :cool:

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