Sighting in a .357 Lever Action


PDA






baz
February 15, 2013, 01:10 PM
I'm trying to sight in a .357 lever action (1894C). It is scoped with an XS Lever Scout mount, 2" high, and forward of the action. Being a pistol cartridge, what is a good notion of an effective range, and what would be a good range to zero at? Any suggestions?

If you enjoyed reading about "Sighting in a .357 Lever Action" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
rcmodel
February 15, 2013, 01:17 PM
I would zero it at 100 yards.

Depending on bullet weight & velocity?

It would never be more then 2" below sight line out to 100.

Then approx 2" low at 125.
5" low at 150.
10" low at 175.
17" low at 200.

rc

ZeSpectre
February 15, 2013, 01:27 PM
I have my 92's sighted for 75 yards, mostly because there is such a wide variety of loads you could run through that style of levergun and that distance seems to work for me.

As to effective range, effective for what would be the question. I've "gonged" an 8" steel plate at somewhere around 175 yards with mine and from the sound of it I don't think anything man-sized or smaller would be in good shape if they were on the receiving end of the deal but if I were actually hunting something with it I'd probably keep my ranges under 100 yards.

MCgunner
February 15, 2013, 02:33 PM
I am sighted dead on at 100, the effective range of the cartridge on deer IMHO. I'm shooting a 165 grain cast, gas checked SWC at just shy of 1900 fps. It lays down 700 ft lbs at 100 yards from my 20" barreled Rossi 92. I sight my light .38 loads (105 SWC at 900 fps) for 50 yards and it shoots minute of squirrel/rabbit at that range and close enough at 25 yards. I shoot irons and have a ghost ring aperture on the gun with click adjustable elevation, so I can quickly adjust for whatever I'm shooting in the gun. I find between the small game hunting and plinking, I shoot a lot more .38 than .357, but I've killed a deer and a hog with the .357. Keep it 100 yards or under and it brings home the bacon. :D

baz
February 15, 2013, 05:33 PM
For me, "effective range" is something like the range over which I can hold dead on and be within two or three inches either way. So, with 100 yard zero, that would put the "effective range" at about 130 yards (about 3" low). And that is probably getting at the margins of the envelope in terms of energy, also. On the plus side, a 100 yard zero appears to be a little over 1" high at 60-70 yards.

And looking at the results from a ballistics calculator, if I zero at 75 yards, I'd be down 4-5 inches at 130 yards.

So I think I like the suggestion to zero for 100 yards best, and figure on not taking any shots out much further than 125 yards or so. Realistically, I would expect most shots to be under 100 yards.

Thanks for the replies. They helped me get my head around this.

hirundo82
February 15, 2013, 05:39 PM
I have a Skinner aperture sight on my Marlin 1894C, which I sighted in 1" high at 50 yards. That puts me at +/- 1" out to 100 yards, and I don't anticipate shooting further than that with this gun.

MCgunner
February 15, 2013, 08:52 PM
For me, "effective range" is something like the range over which I can hold dead on and be within two or three inches either way. So, with 100 yard zero, that would put the "effective range" at about 130 yards (about 3" low). And that is probably getting at the margins of the envelope in terms of energy, also. On the plus side, a 100 yard zero appears to be a little over 1" high at 60-70 yards.

And looking at the results from a ballistics calculator, if I zero at 75 yards, I'd be down 4-5 inches at 130 yards.

So I think I like the suggestion to zero for 100 yards best, and figure on not taking any shots out much further than 125 yards or so. Realistically, I would expect most shots to be under 100 yards.

Sounds like a solid plan to me. :D

ball3006
February 15, 2013, 09:22 PM
Start out at 15 yards to see where the bullets go with respect to the bullseye. Then adjust accordingly. Then move to 25 yards and see where the bullets go. Adjust the scopee accordingly. Then move to 50 yards and see where the bullets go. By this time, the only thing you should need to adjust is elevation. Then move to 100 yards and repeat.

I never shoot my 357 rossi more than 50 yards so that is what it is sighted in for. If I need to shoot 100 yards, I get a bigger gun......chris3

Texan Scott
February 15, 2013, 09:37 PM
I zero at 100 yds. My $.02.

MCgunner
February 15, 2013, 10:09 PM
I never shoot my 357 rossi more than 50 yards so that is what it is sighted in for. If I need to shoot 100 yards, I get a bigger gun......chris3

Great, until you're out with your .357 and your .300 mag is at home. :rolleyes: I guess you could wheel your rifles around in a golf bag and choose the best iron for the shot.

Why not take advantage of what the gun has to offer? It'll kill deer at 100. I've taken one cleanly at 80 with mine.

dragon813gt
February 15, 2013, 10:40 PM
Step one, remove the scope and put a proper peep site on it ;)

Sorry but I can't stand scoped pistol cartridge levers. But if you insist, sight it in at 100 yards. It's effective out to that distance on deer sized game. I wouldn't attempt anything much further on an ethical basis. Now punching paper at 200 yards is a different story.


Brought to you by TapaTalk

boommer
February 15, 2013, 11:03 PM
I think I would just go out to the range and figure it out myself!! effective range on what? DANG green horns how bout going out and try to put a little common sense and foot work into it.

HankR
February 15, 2013, 11:57 PM
Step one, remove the scope and put a proper peep site on it...Sorry but I can't stand scoped pistol cartridge levers

Agree w/ Dragon here, but it's probably best we don't argue religion here on the high road.

boommer
February 16, 2013, 12:23 AM
religion Were?

jakk280rem
February 16, 2013, 01:05 AM
Second the motion to remove scope. Or at least move it down and back where Marlin made provisions for it.

baz
February 16, 2013, 09:26 AM
Second the motion to remove scope. Or at least move it down and back where Marlin made provisions for it.The scope is staying. To all who want to take this thread off topic, there is something you do not realize. I have a visual impairment. A forward mounted scope makes it possible for me to shoot. Remove the scope and go with peep/iron sights, and the gun stays in the rack and never gets used.

It is a big world out there, and there are all sorts of reasons for doing things. Be careful how opinionated you get. Opinions are like...

To those who answered my questions, and helped, thanks.

Fremmer
February 16, 2013, 09:43 AM
Oh, I suppose you could zero at 50 or 75 yards, whatever you figure your average long shot will be, and if you have to shoot at 100 yards, it'll only be a little off. Whatever you're comfortable with, it is up to you!

MCgunner
February 16, 2013, 09:58 AM
Quote:
Step one, remove the scope and put a proper peep site on it...Sorry but I can't stand scoped pistol cartridge levers



Agree w/ Dragon here, but it's probably best we don't argue religion here on the high road.

Well, I agree esthetically, JMHO, but if my eyes get much worse I might not have a choice. I can still use irons, though it's a strain with 60 year old eyes that were never that great iin the first place. But, then, I have other rifles, bolt guns, with scopes. I don't really NEED a scoped pistol caliber carbine. They sure are purtier with irons on 'em. :D I won't knock optics, though, since I may be relegated to them in the future or just give up shooting.

CraigC
February 16, 2013, 02:44 PM
A .357 levergun is typically viewed (by those that use them religiously) as a 100yd rifle. I like to do a lot of shooting with my levers and that means a lot of plinking and practice on small targets and rocks from slingshot range to 250yds. I prefer for them to hit close enough to point of aim at 50yds that I can consistently hit golfball sized targets at that range without holding under. There isn't enough difference at 100yds to matter.

I prefer receiver sights but have no issue whatsoever with folks mounting scopes on THEIR rifle. Especially if you have problems with your eyesight. I only take exception on this issue when someone asks what scope to mount on their 100yd levergun and the ignorant cookie cutter response is "3-9x".

baz
February 16, 2013, 03:10 PM
I only take exception on this issue when someone asks what scope to mount on their 100yd levergun and the ignorant cookie cutter response is "3-9x".Then you should be pleased to learn that mine is 1-4x. ;)

CraigC
February 16, 2013, 03:19 PM
I figured it would be or a fixed ~2x. ;)

Random Discharge
February 16, 2013, 03:54 PM
1-4X on a 357 lever rifle? Guess my 30-30 with a Weaver V3 (1-3X) is underscoped :D

baz
February 16, 2013, 04:51 PM
Well, I don't know if I should mention this, but it is actually a shotgun scope. :what: This one (http://www.midwayusa.com/product/699041/bushnell-banner-shotgun-scope-175-4x-32mm-circle-x-reticle-matte). I misrepresented the magnification earlier. It is 1.75-4x, not 1-4x.

I figured it would be or a fixed ~2x. 1.75x is, rounded, 2x. :)

If you enjoyed reading about "Sighting in a .357 Lever Action" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!