380 auto for my wife


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elktrout
February 17, 2013, 12:53 AM
My wife has small, weak hands. Most auto loaders have a recoil spring that is too stiff for her to pull the slide all the way to the rear. Also, she does not handle recoil well. My Model 15 revolver with 2 inch barrel is pretty heavy for a 38 snubbie, but she only took one shot with it (a target load at that) and put it down.

My thoughts are to find her a nice .380 somewhere. Who makes a good one, and especially one that does not have an overly stiff recoil spring?

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1KPerDay
February 17, 2013, 01:02 AM
Beretta 84/85 is about the only one I can think of. Blowback pistols generally have pretty stiff springs... And the lcp is not easy to rack either.
.380s aren't known for soft recoil either... The get pretty snappy.

Deer_Freak
February 17, 2013, 01:12 AM
You are pushing your wife to hard. When males learn to shoot they start with a 22 rifle. Yet they expect their wives to start with a handgun. My wife shot 22 rifles and 20 ga pump for a couple years before she even considered shooting a handgun. Today she will shoot any handgun just as quick and well as most men. When she needs some stress relief she will pick up a box of 357 ammo and go blow up some water jugs. She might take the 20 ga to the local skeet range and shoot a couple rounds. But that didn't happen overnight. She didn't know anything about guns when I met her. She learned the same way as I did. I introduced her to guns just like I would a teenage boy.

michaelbsc
February 17, 2013, 01:40 AM
My wife has small, weak hands. Most auto loaders have a recoil spring that is too stiff for her to pull the slide all the way to the rear. Also, she does not handle recoil well.

My wife also has small, weak hands. Give her this. It helped my wife a lot.

http://www.corneredcat.com/article/running-the-gun/rack-the-slide/

In fact, just give her the whole web site and stay out of her way.

Don't pull the slide at all. Read the article, and let her have at it.

A pocket .380 is going to bite. Period. You want to control recoil then hand her a full size gun. Besides that, it will have more surface area to hold the slide. I bought her a Ruger LCP, which conceals well, but bites like a rabid dog. My wife tried, liked, and bought, a Beretta 92A1 for herself.

I stayed out of it. She's satisfied. I'm satisfied.

smalls
February 17, 2013, 02:40 AM
Small, weak hands and recoil sensitive? Stay far away from any if the subcompact guns period, let alone .380.

There are a few full size .380's available, but you might as well just move up to 9mm, the recoil isn't much more, and it's less expensive to shoot.

Snowdog
February 17, 2013, 04:09 AM
The answer to your question is almost an obvious one: the Sig Sauer P238.

It's a locked breach that is very mild in recoil when compared to .380acp blowbacks or scanty weight pocket pistols. The slide is quite likely the easiest of all the .380acp pistols to retract (most folks can rack the slide with their pinky wrapped around the rear sight). I was wondering if the spring was tired on the rental I was using, but was told it was a common reaction and it was fine. The mild recoil reinforced that fact.

I recently fired a P238 and now have a P238 HD on the way to my FFL, that's how impressed I was by the thing. The one I fired was incredible. The recoil was absolutely tame and nothing like the LCP I fired a few days before. From my understanding, the P238 is highly recommended by women for women for the reasons I listed.
I also understand they are described as "+p rated" if you're so inclined to use the hotter stuff on the market.

In addition, the quality of construction is second to none, the ergonomics are highly lauded by most who have fired one and they typically come standard with tritium sights that are actually usable.

The downsides? Its single action only and many have an issue with cocked and locked carry. I plan on carrying mine in condition 2, so that means nothing to me. It's how I currently carry my P64 and am used to pulling the hammer on the draw.

It's also expensive, but only you can decide if your wife is worth the investment. Personally, I plan on purchasing another for my wife when she obtains her ccw since she's also fallen in love with mild manners of the P238.

Have her rent one if you can and see what happens.

And as a side note, they're smart looking pistols if you ask me.

Googled images for reference
http://image.ohozaa.com/i/e7e/GefmiE.jpg

http://www.gunlistings.org/uploads/1_pistols_sig_p238_.380_hd_model_105597.jpg

MarshallDodge
February 17, 2013, 05:53 AM
Like others have stated, let her decide.

A 22 is going to be easy to manipulate and have very low recoil. She can practice much longer without getting tired.

meanmrmustard
February 17, 2013, 05:59 AM
My wife has small, weak hands. Most auto loaders have a recoil spring that is too stiff for her to pull the slide all the way to the rear. Also, she does not handle recoil well. My Model 15 revolver with 2 inch barrel is pretty heavy for a 38 snubbie, but she only took one shot with it (a target load at that) and put it down.

My thoughts are to find her a nice .380 somewhere. Who makes a good one, and especially one that does not have an overly stiff recoil spring?
Sounds to me like a Ruger SR22 is in order.

My fiancÚ can't pull the slides back on many of my handguns, except that one.

She shoots it great, can manipulate the slide, and truck-carries it with CCI Stingers.

Get one in her hands and see what she thinks.

M2 Carbine
February 17, 2013, 07:25 AM
Another vote for the Ruger SR22.
I have two. One has a Crimson Trace laser on the rail that makes for a deadly fast accurate low light pistol. (I have a home range where I shoot low light/dark several times a week)

Everyone, including several women that shoot the SR22 like it. I suspect your wife will like the gun and will be able to handle it well.


Look at it this way. It's a lot better if your wife has a 22 that she likes and can handle well, than a .380 that she doesn't like and can't/won't practice enough to get good with.
Ten 22LR COM hits beats the heck out of seven .380 near misses.:)

returningfire
February 17, 2013, 08:05 AM
Get her a Beretta Tomcat or something similar in .32. She can load it without racking the slide they are heavy enough so as not to have sharp recoil especially in 32. A lot of you guys are gonna say a 32 is too small. Well some gun in her purse is better than no gun in her purse, and during some past wars .32 was a common handgun round for soldiers and could administer fatality quite readily when necessary .

Just make sure she watches out for slide bite.

kBob
February 17, 2013, 09:08 AM
A friend that is a lady grew up in a home where making "gun fingers" and going "bang" at another person was reason for punishment. She was also both recoil shy and weak when she grew up and moved out of her folks house and sort of wanted a gun. She did not want a long gun. She thought a .380 M1934 Beretta was to hard to jack back and kicked too much. She ended up shooting an old Colt .32 revolver with .32 S&W Long. It had a small grip, no slide to jack back, and little recoil.

She shot several boxes of ammo over six months or so before she decided maybe something bigger would be better for home defense. She then went to a Model 28 Highway patrolman that she used .38 special in for a few months then tried .357 magnum and moved to that.

She never did get to likeing semi autos except a Whitney Wolverine which she thought just cool as all get out and very Buck Rodgers-ish fun. SHe did eventually get a CWL and carried a Taurus 85 which she shot a bit every quarter or so. Her home defense gun is toay a .44 Special S&W revolver and she broke down and got a long gun as well, a GI M1 Carbine she occassionally shoots.

I think that if we had insisted she go semi auto to begin with or "a better caliber" she would still be not interested in gun rights.......she became the presdident of an NRA affiliate that while she was president won three national NRA Awards and was the SAF Gun rights champion of one month in the early '90's.

Nothing wrong with starting small or "old fashioned"........

-kBob

Trent
February 17, 2013, 09:13 AM
Sounds to me like a Ruger SR22 is in order.

My fiancÚ can't pull the slides back on many of my handguns, except that one.

She shoots it great, can manipulate the slide, and truck-carries it with CCI Stingers.

Get one in her hands and see what she thinks.

A fix for the "can't pull the slide back" is to have her use both hands. Usually those with weaker arms who can't pull the slide back are only pulling with one hand, while the strong hand remains stationary on the firearm. If they push out with that strong hand, while pulling back with a good grip on the off hand, they can "slingshot" that slide back and chamber a round.

My 12 year old daughter can chamber any of my handguns, even those with stiff recoil springs. And she's on the dainty side.

Milkbus
February 17, 2013, 09:42 AM
Take a look at the Bersa Thunder 380. Enough weight to be mild on the recoil. Racking the slide may be a tough, but proper technique could help get it done. http://www.bersa.com/bersa-firearms/thunder-series.html


My wife went ot the LGS by herself and came back with this. It is a nice gun.

meanmrmustard
February 17, 2013, 09:58 AM
A fix for the "can't pull the slide back" is to have her use both hands. Usually those with weaker arms who can't pull the slide back are only pulling with one hand, while the strong hand remains stationary on the firearm. If they push out with that strong hand, while pulling back with a good grip on the off hand, they can "slingshot" that slide back and chamber a round.

My 12 year old daughter can chamber any of my handguns, even those with stiff recoil springs. And she's on the dainty side.
She grip pushes...and still sucks at it. She's not comfortable with practicing, nor is she dainty.

Maybe lazy is a better description. But, I'd rather her have something she can use comfortably, that she also shoots well. Example: she shoots my G32 even better than the SR22, but can't rack the slide. Two different ends of a spectrum. Go figure.

She picked up my SR22, and lets suffice it to say it isn't mine any longer.

herkyguy
February 17, 2013, 10:17 AM
.22 LCR or any semi-auto. Let that simmer for a while then move on to a Sig P238. It's a pleasure to shoot. but start with .22.

GLI45
February 17, 2013, 11:57 AM
My wife has small, weak hands. Most auto loaders have a recoil spring that is too stiff for her to pull the slide all the way to the rear.

Same with my wife. Snowdog's earlier post is right on the money. The Sig P238 is an outstanding small pistol. I bought a Nitron version for my wife and she loves it. Very comfortable to shoot with low felt recoil, easy to rack, has great sights, and is amazingly accurate for such a small pistol. Now she wants the titanium rainbow version which is okay by me because I'll keep the Nitron for myself.

Trent
February 17, 2013, 12:02 PM
She grip pushes...and still sucks at it. She's not comfortable with practicing, nor is she dainty.

Maybe lazy is a better description. But, I'd rather her have something she can use comfortably, that she also shoots well. Example: she shoots my G32 even better than the SR22, but can't rack the slide. Two different ends of a spectrum. Go figure.

She picked up my SR22, and lets suffice it to say it isn't mine any longer.

Could be. But it's not impossible. I taught my 75 year old grandmother to rack the slide of a Springfield XD reliably, those are about as stiff as it gets. My 80 year old grandfather can do it too, he keeps it for self defense.

It's all in the technique. :)

rodinal220
February 17, 2013, 12:17 PM
Colt Mustang Pocketlite:locked breech as opposed to blowback makes it one of the lighter felt recoil .380s on the market IMHO,the Ruger LCP is down right painful for me to shoot.

http://www.coltsmfg.com/Catalog/ColtPistols/Colt380MustangPocketlite.aspx

Learn how to retract the slide correctly,using more hip and upper body than just the arms.

jrdolall
February 17, 2013, 12:38 PM
I got my wife and kids started shooting a Buckmark. Cheap ammo(used to be cheap), no recoil to speak of and easy to racck. Like all gun nuts they progressed at their own pace and soon wanted to shot something "meaner". I carry a ocket 380 and the slide is still difficult for her to maneuver but she can handle the recoil okay. I don't even like to fire 25 rounds from the pocket 380 or pocket 9mm pistols I own. She actually eventually settled on a S&W 642 with laser grips for her purse.

Jaymo
February 17, 2013, 02:14 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Gripmaster-Hand-Exerciser-2-Pack-Black/dp/B0057Y8NNK/ref=sr_1_7?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1361128149&sr=1-7&keywords=grip+strengthener

Get her some of these. They come in light, medium, heavy, and extra heavy.
start her out with light, then medium. Almost anyone can strengthen their hands/forearms.
I taught my wife to use the overhand grip on the slide, and to push the gun forward with her shooting hand/pull the slide back with her weak hand.
Using both hands to work the slide means that each hand is doing only half the work.
It made it a lot easier for her to work the slide on my SR9.

In fact, every shooter should buy some of those grip strengtheners and use them regularly.

jk.308
February 17, 2013, 02:18 PM
another vote for the p238. Just got the girlfriends out of layaway yesterday. Im impressed so much I will be looking for myself the p938 which is just the 9mm version of it for a summer carry. Before all she could handle or cared to shoot was the 22's i had. She hated my p250 with a passion but is in love with this 238.

meanmrmustard
February 17, 2013, 02:27 PM
Could be. But it's not impossible. I taught my 75 year old grandmother to rack the slide of a Springfield XD reliably, those are about as stiff as it gets. My 80 year old grandfather can do it too, he keeps it for self defense.

It's all in the technique. :)
True.

I'm not arguing with form over function though. If she's happy, I'm not unhappy.

Ya know what I'm saying!

hardluk1
February 17, 2013, 02:28 PM
My wife and one daughter both have taurus TCP and bersa 380CC models that they carry that they tried and bought. Racking a slide is more about learning the right way for a lady to rack them. over hand push not a pich and pull. Let HER try a few.

Roadking Rider
February 17, 2013, 03:53 PM
I agree. See if she can shoot a Bersa Thunder .380. They have pretty good following with a lot of women.

snooperman
February 18, 2013, 07:39 AM
Two of the easiest to rack the slide on are the Walther PK 380, not PPK But PK380 and the SIG P238. Both are locked breach guns and well made. I bought the PK 380 for my 72 year old wife with arthritis and it is as easy as my Ruger MKII to rack.

KevinB
February 18, 2013, 08:47 AM
Does anyone have any firsthand experience with the Ruger LC380 yet? I was under the impression this was the very crowd it was marketed to. Larger, easier to manipulate than a micro-sized pistol, and .380 recoil in a 9mm sized package. I just haven't had the chance to handle one yet and feel the force required to operate the slide.

BSA1
February 18, 2013, 09:00 AM
This question comes up fairly often (in fact there is a sticky on the subject) and the responses often show that the posters do not understand the issues with shooting with disabilities such as carpel tunnel or that some ladies are built differently than their man-o-mano spouse and don't like or find shooting handguns painful.

Selecting a handgun for the lady in your life also means setting aside your own percieved notions and be willing to consider all types of firearms and calibers.

The advice "let her select what is wants" is Internet tripe imho.

When said in the context of the man-o-mano giving his lady a heavy gun like the 1911 in the heavy recoiling 45 without considering her skill level and ability I agree that is a poor idea.

On the other hand taking her to a gun shop and having a gun clerk who is probably only being paid a little over minimium wage and may have zero experience with medical issues such as carpel tunnel and the physical differences between men and women sell her a gun is just plain silly.

I posted this question once and it got so out of hand I was called a liar because a couple of the posters can not believe a lady with weak wrists can ride a horse, fight off a mugger but have issues with recoil of handguns.

In my search for a handgun with my wife I have explored the following options;

1. All of the semi-autos handguns she has tried are out. She can not operate the slide. Period. Nada. No can do.

2. She finds most double action revolvers to painful as the recoil hurts her wrists (i.e. carple tunnel again).

3. She can shoot single action revolvers comfortably. We use to shoot in Cowboy Mounted Shooting so she is well experience with shooting with one hand. What some of the posters that do not have experience with single-action revolvers fail to realize is single action revovlers are designed to be shot one handed and the grip is shaped for the barrel to slip upwards in the hand when fired so the recoil is transferred downwards.

The Ruger Single-Six in 32 Mag. has good stopping power. The biggest downside (which I consider a big one) is once a S.A. is cocked the trigger pull is much lighter and the potential problem of decocking it on a live round especially under stress.

This keeps bringing us back to the double action revolver in a caliber that has less recoil. There are not a lot of choices smaller than the 38 but recently I watched a video on Gunblast comparing the Ruger LCR in 38 vs the new 22 Magnum chambering in side by side shooting. The difference in recoil is simply amazing. So much that when I showed the video to my wife she commented that she thought she could handled the 22 mag. just fine.

The 22 magnum should not be confused with it's cousin the Long Rifle cartridge. I have decided to buy a LCR in 22 mag. for her to try (well hopefully some day after Obama quits selling guns and ammo). If it doesn't work out for her I'll pack it around the ranch...

On the other hand if we both like it Lord help the bank account.

Ehtereon11B
February 18, 2013, 10:25 AM
If the slide is a problem have her try a Beretta Tomcat. It isn't a .380 but it eliminates her biggest problem with semi-autos.

Delmar
February 18, 2013, 10:55 AM
If she can otherwise handle 380 recoil, a Model 86 Beretta might be a consideration. You dont have to rack the slide-it has a tipping barrel feature, just rotate the lock and slide it into the chamber.

http://www.berettaweb.com/Beretta%2080/Beretta%2086.htm

Trent
February 18, 2013, 11:16 AM
My wife has a Walther PK380, nice little gun. Somewhat expensive.

jrdolall
February 18, 2013, 12:15 PM
I am not a big fan of the 22LR as a defensive round but if that is all she can handle then it is certainly better than a short stick. I don't have a really small .22 that I feel comfortable carrying from a reliability standpoint but I am sure they are out there. That may not solve the problem with the slide but is there a small .22 revolver that is dependable?

golden
February 18, 2013, 03:10 PM
For me, the only three choices would be:

SIG 232---My favorite carry gun. The aluminum framed gun comes with night sights and weighs 18.5 ounces empty. The grip shape spreads the recoil impulse so that I can shoot 150 rounds at a session without becoming tired.
Very reliable and excellent trigger. Very easy to clean.
Downside is the slow reload because of the heel clip magazine release.

BERETTA 84/85---Most reliable compact pistol I know of. Good accuracy and mild recoil due to the large size of the model 84's grip. It holds 13 rounds, another plus. Good sights and trigger.
If the 84 is too large, try the slimmer 85 with a single collum magazine and 8 round capacity.
Downside is the size of the gun. I have shot compact 9m.m. pistols that were the same size.

CZ 83---The heaviest of the lot. It is similar is size and features to the BERETTA and has a 12 shot magazine. The grip seems a little more compact, but the steel frame means it is not light. Very reliable design with a nice trigger and good sights.
Downside is the weight.

I would take any of the above guns, but for pocket use, only the SIG is viable. With a GALCO pocket holster and deep pockets, you can just get away with it.

Jim

aarondhgraham
February 18, 2013, 03:40 PM
I take a lot of young women shooting,,,
More than not it is their first time.

They all seem to like shooting my Bersa Thunder .380,,,
I teach them how to use both arms racking the slide,,,
None of them have any problem after a few mags.

But the real beauty of the Bersa is the Thunder .22,,,
It's identical in size/shape to the Thunder 380,,,
Start her on the .22 and move to the .380.

Buying both guns isn't that much money,,,
Cheap practice with the .22 has made my friends good shooters with both.

Just a thought,,,

Aarond

.

fpgt72
February 18, 2013, 04:57 PM
I agree with everything BSA has to say (great bikes BTW) My wife is pretty small 5' nothing and 100lbs soaking wet with rocks in her pockets. We have tried many different things. Bersa 380...she even bought CT grips for the thing...recoil hurts...leaves bruses. This is the same woman that got a bruse on her shoulder after shooting high power....with a M1 carbine...and yes she had it firm against her shoulder.

We tried many small guns....even a 1903 colt the recoil hurt her...and she still could not work the slide.

So we tried revolvers, little J frame...nope drew blood in the web of her thumb where the gun would kick back.

She had about 10 different people at our club work with her....people that have shot for years....top 25 shooters in the nation in their specialities....these folks know how to shoot.....we came away with she is just small, has thin skin and just flat can not shoot anything over a 22 without pain to herself.

The woman can flat shoot she does very well in small bore silhouette, and has done some of the pistol games (ppc and such) with a Neos, and a old woodsman (our club is pretty informal they will let her play, just not score her)...bottom line is she knows how to shoot.

We went with what another poster suggested, a small rimfire pistol with good quality ammo (and I think this is the key)...22 ammo is about the most iffy ammo out there, so if for what ever reason you can't manage a larger caliber, get a good quality 22 and good ammo.

I have long said you have no business to carry if you do not train and practice all aspects...and one of those is shooting the gun you choose to carry. If it hurts she will not shoot it.

One last thing of all the people that say 22 is not enough I have yet to find someone that wants to be shot by one....on the other hand I have seen first hand a .45 be stopped by a cell phone....nothing is 100%, but everyone will agree that some gun is better than no gun.

ahandgunner2
February 18, 2013, 06:16 PM
+1 (or is it 10?) on the SigP238...Not bad at all in the 380 - the LCP and everything else are much worse....

BUT, better (and cheaper) still is the P230/232 that Golden mentioned. Can can blued aluminum frame or metal SS...both are great and for whatever reason (maybe they are not super small for a 380) they never seemed to bring what they are worth. I have several and was going to sell one a while ago and can't really get enough to make it worth my while. I love shooting it since it makes the P238 look like it kicks hard!

Search Gunbroker/AuctionArms for Sig P230 or P232 and see what I mean!!

Torian
February 18, 2013, 06:18 PM
Every decent .380 I've handled had recoil and a hard-racking slide to boot. You are better of getting a .38 special revolver, particularly if she is a new shooter, and has issues working an action.

Ignition Override
February 19, 2013, 01:26 AM
The OP should not even consider -although it's in 9x18 Makarov- the Polish P64.
I considered buying the type as my First Handgun until the second session. No more, and other than recoil I really like them.

That day, the next gun was a Bersa Thunder .380 and the recoil was a stark contrast.

fpgt72
February 19, 2013, 08:01 AM
We also tried the CZ82....same basic thing.

Men tend to forget that women are just built different (thank god) they wear their clothes different, and some just can't do it...end of story.

Then there are those with medical problems....I have nerve damage in my left arm...makes it quite hard for me to do some....some I can't do.

There comes a time when you just have to look to other solutions to the problem.

C0untZer0
February 19, 2013, 08:52 AM
Beretta 86 has a tip-up barrel.

Ignition Override
February 20, 2013, 02:23 AM
Roadking Rider:

For what it is worth, the friend who let me try his Bersa Thunder .380 volunteers now and then for TDY in Afghanistan as an Army Reserve JAG.
He has tried out an interesting mix of guns over there.

B. is about 6'2", likes both his Bersa .380 and Russian Makarov. The B. .380 type will be my First Handgun if a really used Sig 232 is not avail. in west TN in my 'really used' price range.

MedWheeler
February 20, 2013, 12:10 PM
I also like the Bersa Thunder for consideration in this role, especially if the slide-racking issue can be resolved through training.

But, as BSA1 mentioned, the Ruger LCR in .22WMR would be an excellent option.

Mr. Trashcan
February 20, 2013, 04:11 PM
The Sig P250 comes in 380. If she can handle the weight (about 25oz) and size (halfway between a Glock 19 and 26 for the subcompact) it's an excellent gun and affordable. Smooth, safe 6lb. DAO trigger that anyone can pull and less recoil than the smaller guns. There's a video on YT of a guy's young daughter shooting one at the range and one where he discusses the gun in detail. And the slide is relatively easy to rack.

Now OTOH like BSA1, my wife is 85lbs and very weak. She can not rack any slide, so like him I'm considering a Ruger LCR in 22 for her. Still better than mace.

thralldad
February 20, 2013, 09:49 PM
Another vote for the PK 380. My wife had carpal tunnel surgery and can't rack my Makarov. No problems withe the Walther.

jon_in_wv
February 20, 2013, 10:01 PM
I gave my Mother in law my Bersa 380 when her husband passed away. The slide is easy to rack and recoil is almost nil. She has shot it a little and she really likes it.

zxcvbob
February 20, 2013, 10:29 PM
How about a classic Colt .380? I don't remember if that's the M1903 or M1908.

radar1972
February 21, 2013, 12:06 AM
+1 to BSA1. Considering her limitations, I would try the LCR in 22 magnum.

kBob
February 21, 2013, 07:11 AM
Actually an old Star S series might have some possibilities if you must have a semi auto.

With the external hammer Single action only it is part of the recoil system. By cocking the hammer first it is a little easier to rack the slide.

If she is recoil shy I would think twice before buying a plastic framed .22Magnum revolver until she had shot one.

As other have said find a place that does rentals and that has a wide selection and let her try stuff before you buy.

-kBob

zxcvbob
February 21, 2013, 08:59 AM
Has anyone actually fired a .22 Mag handgun? They are LOUD. Not as loud as a .30 Carbine handgun, but the same high pitched ice-pick-in-your-ear loud.

Cokeman
February 21, 2013, 03:53 PM
.30 Carbine handgun?

meanmrmustard
February 21, 2013, 03:54 PM
.30 Carbine handgun?
They make .30 Carbine revolvers.

zxcvbob
February 21, 2013, 04:29 PM
.30 Carbine handgun?
I've got a Ruger Blackhawk .30, and it really clears out some elbow room at the range :evil: You need really good ear protection with that thing.

The Automag III was also chambered in .30 Carbine, and there was another one... Kimball?

Cokeman
February 21, 2013, 04:48 PM
Oh, I've never seen one.

kBob
February 22, 2013, 11:41 AM
Supposedly the Isreali police had a few S&W clone revolvers made up in .30 Carbine in the late 50's or so. As a 15 Y/o with an M-1 Carbine in the 60's I wanted one bad. I even speculated on the posibility of an Nframe like a model27 six inch being so chambered and using an eight shot cylinder and half moon clips. One of dad's buddies left him a "cowboy pistol" and as the only Single Action I knew of the guy having was a .30 Carbine Blackhawk I got all excited....turned out to be a .22.....:(

It was the Kimbal that looked like a High standard .22 semi auto on steroids that was the semi auto from fifty years ago. I have looked at two but never fired one. Might still be one in the Ocala Armory near Ocala Florida if you just have to have one. I think the Auto Mag he had did sell.

I do not think of a .30 carbine Black hawk or a .22 magnum revolver report as ice pick to the head.....more of a root canal pain for me......:neener:

ACKKKK! SEVERE DRIFT IN EFFECT!!!!!

-kBob

Peter M. Eick
February 28, 2013, 04:14 PM
Agreed, but the 30 carbine Blackhawk is a lot of fun to shoot. I regret selling mine.

Back to the 380 for the wife.

Mine does not like my 84 because the recoil is sharp, but she does like my Colt Gov 380 which is a 1911 clone in a small format with a locked breech.

Shadow 7D
February 28, 2013, 04:42 PM
Go to the top of the page and read the "so you want to buy a gun for your wife/GF"...

SwissArmyDad
February 28, 2013, 04:57 PM
My wife shot a 642 and a SP101 back to back two days ago.

The SP101 was a "OH, we're already done with 40rds" experience.

The 642 was a "do I have to pull the trigger on that 5th little bastard" experience.

9 ounces, cushy grips and a sweet single action trigger seemingly made all the difference.

I already knew that about her, but we don't own revolvers for some stupid reason (me selling them probably has something to do with that..haha) so I had forgotten what a shootist she becomes, and how giddy she feels plucking those spend shells out out of the cylinder when she's done with set of cartridges.

So, my point? Definitely let her decide on what is comfortable and dare-say-it FUN for her to shoot. If it's fun, you're gonna have to watch your a$$, cuz she's going to know to shoot the crap out of that thing.

SwissArmyDad
February 28, 2013, 04:58 PM
Also, just to add. My wife had a lot of fun with my Bersa Thunder .380...

Cocked & Locked
February 28, 2013, 06:23 PM
How about a SIG P230 or P232 .380 for wifey?

http://pic90.picturetrail.com/VOL2169/3082611/6263277/404226087.jpg

hestes
March 2, 2013, 03:17 PM
Most small 380s have more recoil than people expect. I have an LCP and I don't enjoy shooting it. I have heard great things about the Sig P238, but I have never shot one. That said, I love shooting my XD 45 Compact, but I usually carry an XD 9 subcompact. As a woman, I recommend letting her shoot as many different types of pistols and revolvers as she can. If you have some friends that have different types of firearms, let her try them out and see if she can find one that she enjoys shooting and will practice with.

Alot of people make the mistake of trying to have a woman rack the slide on an auto using just the hand on the slide. Most men I know rack the slide that way, but many women have trouble with it because of a lack of grip or upper body strength. Have her try to push with her strong hand on the grip (finger off the trigger of course) while pulling the slide back towards her body with the other. That will allow her to use both arms and that might help her rack the slides. I've used this method with several other women I've taught that had issues racking the slides and it has worked well.

Good luck and I hope she finds something that she likes! :)

kBob
March 2, 2013, 09:28 PM
Peter,

The little single action auto "colts" that look like 1911s areactually pretty much Star S model clones which I suggested folks look at some time back and up stream.

I had one student that could not do a slide rack in any of the prefeered ways because of lack of upper body strength and grip strength. Some folkf got upset when I told her to grip the gun normally in the firing hand, place her none firing hand over the gun so that the thumb faces the rear of the slide and over the slide serrations rather than the push pull thing one pushes with both hands.

Some were concerned yhat the muzzle may tilt up toward her non firing fore arm during this and it may be a concern to consider and perhaps result in not even trying this. Others pointed out that her non firing hand covered the ejection port and it there was a round already in the chamber and she were trying to work the action this round might not be able to fall away from the ejection port. Some even worried about the possibility of the gun snapping shut on some skin of her palm or fingers. It was a lively discussion at our class critic. Mean while the student had worked the slide for her class atleast.

Again with exposed hammer single action guns thumb cocking the hammer before one tried to rack the slide reduces the amount of force needed to get the slide back.

When in the service I was taught to rack the slide of a 1911 A1 when no second hand was available to grab the slide by placing the lower portion of the slide on the edge of a hard object or even the edge of the holster and shove the gun forward to rack the slide. Of course to use that techneque the pistol can not have a full length recoil spring guide....another reason I disliked the change to Beretta by the armed forces.

I am not suggesting you try any of these odd ball techneques but only explaining what I have seen work. There are certainly safety questions to be raised by all of them. If noting else these give you something to think about and discard if you think without you spinning your wheels coming up with the same things.

Good luck
Be safe

-kBob

Analogkid
March 2, 2013, 09:40 PM
I bought my Wife a .380 Hi-point. It is the same frame and slide as the c9 and has very little recoil.

At the time She had Carpul Tunnel left over from Pregnancy but wanted to go shooting with us.
I Stopped at a range that had one for rent and I shot it. We didn't have to fiddle with it much. We messed with the feed lips a little with a leatherman and it eats anything now.

It's the Ugliest gun out of the bunch we shoot but she makes all of us guys look like goofs with it and it doesn't hurt her hands.

Matt Dillon
March 2, 2013, 10:08 PM
Have you considered the CZ83?

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