Gun related expressions.


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jsalcedo
March 11, 2004, 12:27 AM
Every day we repeat phrases without thinking where they came from.

I got to thinking about gun related expressions like

Lock stock and barrel

Dodging a bullet

Set your sights on _______

Shotgun effect

Riding shotgun

Shotgun wedding

Straight shooter

Under the gun

Flash in the pan

Shooting blanks

Sniping (like on ebay)

Can anyone think of more?

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bamf
March 11, 2004, 12:33 AM
I got one more

The whole nine yards

dukeofurl
March 11, 2004, 12:34 AM
"breaking the 180"

KaceCoyote
March 11, 2004, 12:48 AM
son of a gun?

modifiedbrowning
March 11, 2004, 12:50 AM
"pulled the trigger" as in making a decision.

PromptCritical
March 11, 2004, 12:53 AM
Going off half cocked?

A shot in the dark?

Edited to add: DROP THE HAMMER!

glockten
March 11, 2004, 12:55 AM
"Bite the bullet"

"Loaded for bear"

"Gun-shy"

jsalcedo
March 11, 2004, 12:59 AM
I heard on American shooter the expression "sharp shooter"
Came from the target shooters of the late 19th century using sharps rifles.

Good ones keep em coming...

sm
March 11, 2004, 01:01 AM
Lock & Load
Going off half cocked
Flying Ashtrays
Widow Makers

MarkDido
March 11, 2004, 01:38 AM
Shotgun shack

Firing a broadside

454c
March 11, 2004, 01:40 AM
Hotter than a 2 dollar pistol

bfox
March 11, 2004, 01:44 AM
Shooting your mouth off

Double Maduro
March 11, 2004, 03:43 AM
cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey
(no it isn't dirty, look it up)

Ready on the right.

DM

Stickjockey
March 11, 2004, 03:46 AM
He/she's a pistol.

TonyB
March 11, 2004, 07:38 AM
Head hunter

TerryBob
March 11, 2004, 09:23 AM
I run into an old friend and his pregnant girlfriend and he told me that "The gun went off before I got it out of the Holster".

Khornet
March 11, 2004, 09:30 AM
hair-trigger temperament, too quick on the draw, keep your powder dry, powder-keg situation, he has a short fuse, giving 'em both barrels, shotgun apartment, in the crosshairs, under the gun, going great guns, picked off, incoming, shot in the dark, gunning for someone, hired gun, gunslinger, 'rifling' a football, loaded for bear, loaded situation, long shot, cannon fodder, heavy artillery (as in bring in the power players), and many more.

TarpleyG
March 11, 2004, 11:26 AM
"You can run but you'll only die tired."

Something like that anyway.

GT

Sam Adams
March 11, 2004, 11:32 AM
I'm afraid that all of those expressions are, henceforth, verboten , since they represent the violent, racist, homophobic, chauvinistic way of life imposed on our society by a bunch of dead white males in the past. The penalties range from heavy fines and seizure of your children on the first offense to castration on the second offense to execution and seizure of the rest of your assets on the third offense.

The Language Police
Hillary Clinton, Grand Inquisitress

Skunkabilly
March 11, 2004, 11:45 AM
Firing/shooting from the hip

LevelHead
March 11, 2004, 11:46 AM
OK so I *had* to look up the brass monkey thing. :)

Meaning
Very cold weather conditions.
Origin
Uncertain origin.

Some references say that the brass triangles that supported stacks of iron cannonballs on sailing ships were called monkeys and that in cold weather, as brass contracts more than iron, the triangles contracted sufficiently for the balls to fall off.

No one has been able to provide evidence that such devices were called monkeys, or even that they existed.

The Royal Navy records that, on their ships at least, planks with circular holes were used to store cannonballs. Also, a little geometry shows that a pyramid of balls will topple over if the base is tilted by more than 30 degrees. This movement is commonplace on sailing ships and it just isn't plausible that cannonballs were stacked this way.

If we discount all of the above and for the sake of argument assume that the contraction of a brass triangle would cause a stack of balls to fall over, science comes to the rescue again. The coefficient of expansion of brass is 0.000019; that of iron is 0.000012. If the base of the stack were one metre long the drop in temperature needed to make the 'monkey' shrink relative to the balls by a millimetre, would be around 100 degrees Celcius. It is hardly credible that amount of change would have the slightest effect. In any case in weather like that the sailors would probably have better things to think about.

I don't know what a nautical version of an urban myth is called, but whatever it is this story warrants its use.

Nazirite
March 11, 2004, 12:48 PM
"Get the lead out Marine"

zahc
March 11, 2004, 12:54 PM
"the whole shootin' match" (used like 'nine yards')

dischord
March 11, 2004, 01:18 PM
His aim is off.

On target

Missed its mark

Had in his sights

Zero in.

Broad side of a barn

Don't give them ammunition.

Blowback (?)

Oh shoot (?)

Itchy finger.

Jim March
March 11, 2004, 03:57 PM
"On the money" refers to lowering the hammer of an SAA onto an unloaded cylinder which often contained a rolled-up $20 bill.

Amadeus
March 11, 2004, 04:41 PM
Shotgun shack.

Trigger happy.

Hair trigger temper.

"right between the eyes."

Amadeus
March 11, 2004, 04:44 PM
Pistol whipped.

CJ
March 11, 2004, 04:45 PM
Jumping/jumped the gun

Going postal (somewhat related)

hansolo
March 11, 2004, 07:15 PM
Shooting Blanks

NOTE to self: don't leave monkey out in really cold weather

P95Carry
March 11, 2004, 07:27 PM
Going postal (somewhat related) CJ, or anyone ... do remind me of the origin of that saying. I know what it means but danged if I can recollect how it came into being.

jsalcedo
March 11, 2004, 07:43 PM
Going postal

Late 80's early 90's apparently some postal managers and supervisors were treating postal workers very badly and made for a extremely hostile work environment, hazing, retribution for reporting problems etc...

A couple of folks snapped under the pressure, came to work and shot
the managers and supervisors. Once it happened I guess it set the stage for copycats.

This is off the top of my head I'm sure a news search could bring up names and places

Ron_Miami
March 11, 2004, 08:22 PM
Gun shy

ietrash
March 11, 2004, 08:51 PM
Quote:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I got one more

The whole nine yards
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I thought this referred to the capacity of the bed on a dump truck. Most hold 9 cubic yards.

winstonsmith
March 11, 2004, 08:55 PM
Jsalcedo said: Flash in the pan

I thought flash in the pan was from panning for gold? When one would see something shiny and think it was gold, but it just was a flash in the pan.

Am I wrong?

Double Maduro
March 11, 2004, 09:04 PM
Winstonsmith,

I always heard that "flash in the pan" referred to flintlock rifles. When the striker would ignite the powder in the pan but fail to ignite the charge.

DM

XLMiguel
March 11, 2004, 09:29 PM
Did somebody say "short round" or pot shot?

Levelhead - a 30 degree heel on a sailing vessel is pretty extrem and is not common at all except in some pretty heavy weather, FWIW. IIRC, shot was usualy stowed in crates, hauled on deck with the charges by the 'powder monkey', as needed.

nine yards = length of machinegun ammo belts for WW2 fighter planes, i.e. emptied the gun into the target

P95Carry
March 11, 2004, 10:45 PM
jsalcedo ... proving quite an illuminating thread!!

Thx for the mention re ''Gone Postal'' ... makes sense and is I guess about how I imagined .. or half remembered!:p

Rebeldon
March 12, 2004, 12:00 AM
"Shot your wad"

Regarding a single-shot musket.

jsalcedo
March 12, 2004, 12:06 AM
"Shot your wad"

How did I miss that one? :o




More on postal: 1995

PALATINE, Illinois (CNN) -- Police in the Chicago suburb of Palatine have arrested a postal employee in the shooting of two people at a mail processing center Tuesday morning. One of the victims was critically wounded. All three workers apparently are mail sorters. There is no immediate word on the gunman's motive.

Police said the employee used a semi-automatic handgun. They tracked him to his home in the northwestern suburb of Northlake half an hour after the shooting. The gunman shot one person in the building's lobby and the other in the sorting area. The victim in critical condition reportedly suffered two gunshots to the chest. The other victim was shot in the neck.

There have been 39 killings in U.S. post offices in the past decade
from 1990 to 1995

gburner
March 12, 2004, 12:14 AM
lock, stock and barrel.

btw....everybody's monkey shrinks when it's cold. George Costanza:p

El Cid
March 12, 2004, 12:42 AM
He died of lead poisoning.

Shoot low sheriff! He's riding a shetland!


I thought "lock, stock and barrel" ment when you buy a store you buy it from the lock on the front door, the stock in trade, and the water barrel in the back.

El Cid
March 12, 2004, 12:48 AM
POP a cap on him!


I'm a newbie here. Been posting on several others and this thread was too good to pass up. Unfortunatly, by the time I got signed in most of the good sayings had done been posted.

dukeofurl
March 12, 2004, 01:32 AM
"calling the shots"

Freedomv
March 12, 2004, 02:40 AM
A note on "Son of a gun"
I heard that it came from the fact that sailing ships often carried women for the sole purpose of "intertaining" the men of the crew while at sea. They very often gave birth while at sea and that was done on the gun deck and because no one knew who fathered the child they were called "son of the gun".
Is there another story as to the origin of the saying?
Vern

Strings
March 12, 2004, 02:50 AM
I have to argue with Jim March n this one:

>"On the money" refers to lowering the hammer of an SAA onto an unloaded cylinder which often contained a rolled-up $20 bill.<

I actually roled a bill and stuck it in one of my CAS pistols once. Ended up with a jammed revolver, as the rolled bill slid forward and stopped the cylinder from rotating...

Freedomv
March 12, 2004, 05:07 AM
This is in reguards to the brass monkey thing and the observation of another as to a ship listing 30 degrees will cause the balls to roll out of place.
I don't know if they were stacked in a triangle pattern, I think that they may have been stacked in a square pattern thus having a four by four stack there would be 30 balls available. If the balls were spread apart so as to not touch one another the next tier of balls would fall deeper into the pattern and thus would not roll out of position as easily and would survive a much more violent angle of the ships deck. Does this make sense or is my thinking wrong? I don't want to start a flame as they say, just wondering.
Vern

zpo
March 12, 2004, 05:29 AM
El Cid

The Discovery Channel told me that lock stock and barrel meant a flintlock rifle.

El Cid
March 12, 2004, 07:42 AM
Freeedomv...


**A note on "Son of a gun"***

This reminds me of the ol' gal who worked on a construction crew at the plant. When she became pregnant she said she was going to name the child "Target" because all of the men had a shot at it!


To ZPO

I got my version of Lock, stock, and barrell from an old gun magazine about 30 years ago that discussed where such quotes came from.
Both quotes can be used for their intended purposes.

MrMurphy
March 12, 2004, 09:41 AM
The whole brass monkey thing (according to my father, a 17 year Navy man) it's "Charm the balls off a brass monkey" since the ready ammunition for the gun sat on the brass square plate (the monkey) in a triangle. In cold weather, the iron shot would freeze to each other (not the brass plate) since they all rested against each other. So the loader who could manage to get a cannonball off the others could literally charm the balls off a brass monkey. :)

ceetee
March 12, 2004, 10:49 AM
Nobody's yet mentioned, "Hold your fire" and Crossfire".

How about "Don't fire until you see the whites in their eyes" and having something "In your sights" or "In range"?


It was always my understanding, also, that "Lock, stock, and barrel" referred to the three components of a flintlock rifle.

12 Volt Man
March 12, 2004, 10:52 AM
Shotgun!
-------------------------------------------------
I got this from an old email, I don't know who authored it.)


The rules listed below apply to the calling of Shotgun
(the passenger seat) in an automobile.
Section I


The Basic Rules

1. In order to call Shotgun, the caller must pronounce the word "Shotgun" in a clear voice. This call must be heard and acknowledged by the driver. The other occupants of the vehicle need not hear the call as long as the driver verifies the call.

2. Shotgun may only be called if all occupants of the vehicle are outside and on the way to said vehicle.

3. Early calls are strictly prohibited. Shotgun may only be called while walking toward the vehicle and only applies to the drive immediately forthcoming. Shotgun can never be called while inside a vehicle or still technically on the way to the first location. For example, one can not get out of a vehicle and call Shotgun for the return journey.

4. The driver has final say in all ties and disputes. The driver has the right to suspend or remove all shotgun privileges from one or more persons.

Section II


Special Cases

These special exceptions to the rules above should be considered in the order presented; the case listed first will take precedence over any of the cases beneath it, when applicable.

1. In the instance that the normal driver of a vehicle is drunk or otherwise unable to perform their duties as driver, then he/she is automatically given Shotgun.

2. If the instance that the person who actually owns the vehicle is not driving, then he/she is automatically given Shotgun, unless they decline.

3. In the instance the the driver's spouse, lover, partner, or hired prostitute for the evening is going to accompany the group, he/she is automatically given Shotgun, unless they decline.

4. In the instance that one of the passengers may become so ill during the course of the journey that the other occupants feel he/she will toss their cookies, then the ill person should be given Shotgun to make appropriate use of the window.

5. In the instance that only one person knows how to get to a given location and this person is not the driver, then as the designated navigator for the group they automatically get Shotgun, unless they decline.

6. In the instance that one of the occupants is too wide or tall to fit comfortably in the back seat, then the driver may show mercy and award. Shotgun to the genetic misfit. Alternatively, the driver and other passengers may continually taunt the poor fellow as they make a three hour trip with him crammed in the back.


Section III

The Survival of the Fittest Rule


1. If the driver so wishes, he/she may institute the Survival of the Fittest Rule on the process of calling Shotgun. In this case all rules, excepting I-4, are suspended and the passenger seat is occupied by whoever can take it by force.

2. The driver must announce the institution of the Survival of the Fittest Rule with reasonable warning to all passengers. This clause reduces the amount of blood lost by passengers and the damage done to the vehicle.

Please follow the above rules to the best of your ability. If there are any arguments or exceptions not covered in these rules, please refer to rule I-4.

Freedomv
March 12, 2004, 11:09 AM
So many ---------- did" hang fire" get mentioned?
Vern

kentucky bucky
March 12, 2004, 01:20 PM
How about :

Slap leather
Shot across the bow (as in ship)
pull a fine bead
Kentucky windage

Riffraff
March 12, 2004, 01:33 PM
Hawkeye.

I always thought it was funny in MASH that a raging liberal had the nickname afforded expert marksmen.

Zedicus
March 12, 2004, 03:11 PM
Dunno if anyone mentioned these...

Blast it!
Give it to em! (Shoot him/her)
Let em Have it! (Fire at will)
Hog Leg (meaning Revolver/Sixgun)
Caught one (got shot)
Spliting Hairs (think it's a marksman related one)

grampster
March 12, 2004, 03:57 PM
12 volt: If you didn't get shotgun you tried for "peashooter" which is the middle position of the front seat.:D
grampster

So as to not hijack the thread: "making boom-boom"

jsalcedo
March 12, 2004, 04:01 PM
"peashooter" which is the middle position of the front seat

Unfortunately that position was named something else having to do with a female canine.

Adding injury to insult was the 5 speed.

ceetee
March 12, 2004, 04:17 PM
Riffraff:

In the story line of "MASH", Hawkeye Pierce's father (also a doctor) named him that after the character in "The Last of the Mohicans."

Zedicus

I always thought "splitting hairs" was sword-related (ie: the sword was really sharp if it was sharp enough to "split a hair..."

Sunray
March 12, 2004, 04:26 PM
"Shoot 'em in the back."
Uncle Fester
And The Discovery Channel programs say a lot of stuff that's nonsense. So do History Channel programs. On both sides of the border. The 'Two Men in a Trench' series is good, but they also failed to acknowledge AM Sir Hugh Dowding's part in the Battle of Britain and the preparations for same. Said Keith Park commanded from Bentley Priory. He didn't. That was Dowding's office. My point is that TV isn't the place to get good info.
It's 'riding shotgun'. Had to do with stage coaches. Everywhere. Not just in the US Old West. Mind you, I have a seat.

Sunray
March 12, 2004, 05:11 PM
"Shoot 'em in the back."
Uncle Fester
And The Discovery Channel programs say a lot of stuff that's nonsense. So do History Channel programs. On both sides of the border. The 'Two Men in a Trench' series is good, but they also failed to acknowledge AM Sir Hugh Dowding's part in the Battle of Britain and the preparations for same. Said Keith Park commanded from Bentley Priory. He didn't. That was Dowding's office. My point is that TV isn't the place to get good info.
It's 'riding shotgun'. Had to do with stage coaches. Everywhere. Not just in the US Old West. Mind you, I have a seat.

Hand_Rifle_Guy
March 13, 2004, 07:35 AM
"Keep your powder dry" for "stay alert/be prepared".

"Warning shots" or a "shot across the bow" can be any sort of heads-up.

"A bird in the hand..." isn't about trapping, is it?

How about a "thousand-yard stare"?

Ky Larry
March 13, 2004, 08:54 AM
Loose cannon.
Gun shy.
Cannon fodder.
Right down the pipe.

MagKnightX
March 13, 2004, 10:00 AM
hand_rifle_guy: a thousand-yard stare is actually something you usually see in Vietnam veterans. It's staring far off into space. They mainly developed it after having stared long distances through the jungle to watch for Charlie.

And "bird in the hand" is how it's better to definitely have something relatively good than to only potentially have something very good.

Typhoon
March 13, 2004, 10:05 AM
And don't forget, "the smoking gun..."

Jim March
March 13, 2004, 02:50 PM
Hunter Rose: 19th Century cash was bigger than today's, and fit a 45LC chamber quite well.

Ky Larry
March 13, 2004, 06:19 PM
The "thousand yard stare" did not originate in Viet Nam. I've seen photographs of Civil War soldiers with the same look. I think it come from fatigue, stress, and seeing things no human should ever see.

M67
March 13, 2004, 06:49 PM
jsalcedo, I heard on American shooter the expression "sharp shooter"
Came from the target shooters of the late 19th century using sharps rifles.It's older than the Sharps rifles. We have the same word in Norwegian (skarpskytter) and in German (Scharfsch├╝tze). I have seen it used in English in texts at least as old as late 18th century.

ceetee, Riffraff:

In the story line of "MASH", Hawkeye Pierce's father (also a doctor) named him that after the character in "The Last of the Mohicans."

Zedicus

I always thought "splitting hairs" was sword-related (ie: the sword was really sharp if it was sharp enough to "split a hair..." And the Hawkeye in "The Last of the Mohicans" got his name at the end of "Deerslayer" IIRC. He shot a hostile Injun who complemented him on his marksmanship and gave him the name Hawkeye before he died. So the character in "MASH" was named after a sharpshooter no matter how you split the hairs... :)

LevelHead
March 13, 2004, 10:37 PM
Lovin' this thread...

I hear these at work all the time in meetings.

Give 'em both barrels
pull the trigger
drop the hammer
on target
in range
he's "in my sights"
go off half cocked
the whole nine yards (machine gun belts IIRC)
in the crosshairs
zero'd in
point blank
don't get all "up in arms"

Lock stock and barrel was always a rifle to me. "Lockwork" being the action. Flintlock, caplock etc... Lock stock and barrel thus meaning all the pieces or "the whole thing".

Flash in the pan as I understand it is when the flint strikes the pan and ignites the powder in the pan but does not ignite the powder in the barrel - thus it was only a flash in the pan. The goldrush thing makes sense to me too though this is the first I ever heard it.

Love the brass monkey stuff. The "charm" one makes a lot more sense to me, but I'll admit to being clueless about any of it. :confused:

More!

camaro88
March 13, 2004, 10:46 PM
Actually, the saying "the whole nine yards" is an old Scottish saying refering to the length of the bolt of wool used to make great kilts. It takes about 8 yards to make a great kilt, and wool came in nine yard segements, so they would buy "the whole nine yards"

redneck2
March 14, 2004, 09:21 AM
Lock, stock, and barrel

Gun makers used to have a "specialty". Some would make locks, there were barrel makers, and some carved the stock out and finished the gun

When you bought lock, stock, and barrel, you had a completed firearm

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