Firearm smells awful


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beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 09:38 PM
Just like the title says.

I bought a used 336c with the JM stamp. I bought it for a song and a dance ($100), but man does it smell like a camp fire something awful. I mean just handling the gun leaves me smelling like an all nighter at a bon fire.

It is smelling up my safe, what can I do to get this smell off without damaging anything?

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TurtlePhish
February 18, 2013, 09:40 PM
Have you cleaned it?

That's a really weird problem. If it's something on the metal it should clean off relatively easily. If it's the wood, probably be hard.

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 09:42 PM
yeah, I took the lever off, and pulled the bolt. cleaned inside the receiver, and inside the bore, and all on the outside with CLP. I even tried hunting scent stomper on the wood to no avail.

dpote
February 18, 2013, 09:44 PM
Could it have been in a fire and absorbed the odor?
I would take off all the wood, and clean the wood with Ballistol.
The smell could be trapped on the underside of the forearm.

Dave

Akita1
February 18, 2013, 09:46 PM
if the wood wasn't properly treated/coated in may be impossible to remove the smell. You can try to seal it again, or maybe just a new stock?

thump_rrr
February 18, 2013, 09:47 PM
Ozone chamber.

akv3g4n
February 18, 2013, 09:47 PM
I have a buddy that works for a home restoration company. They have an ozone room that they put smoke damaged merchandise it to remove the odors. You could probably search out a company like that it your area and see if they can do it for you for a reasonable price.

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 09:47 PM
when I first looked at it, I noticed the smell. I thought he might have been using a woodburning stove to heat his home with, and the smell would soon fade. Nope, its hangin in there full force.

T Bran
February 18, 2013, 09:47 PM
Brownells sells new wood for a fair price.
I really cant see a piece of metal holding scent as bad as you describe so it is probably the wood.
You may be able to seal the smell in with some clear coat but I'd probably just replace it.
Good luck with the stench.
T

Agsalaska
February 18, 2013, 09:47 PM
That is odd

rcmodel
February 18, 2013, 09:48 PM
Perhaps a smoker owned it??

Wash everything you can get to with mineral spirits.

Then if that don't do any good, spray the wood with Febreze and wipe it off several times.

http://www.febreze.com/en-US/odor-problem/smoke-odor

rc

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 10:25 PM
think putting it in a gun case with baking soda and or charcoal would help any?

rcmodel
February 18, 2013, 10:29 PM
Baking soda will take the bluing off & rust anything else you put in the case from now on.

Try what I said to try in post #11 before you do anything rash.

rc

CLP
February 18, 2013, 10:29 PM
Could it have been in a fire and absorbed the odor?
I would take off all the wood, and clean the wood with Ballistol.
The smell could be trapped on the underside of the forearm.

Dave
My thoughts exactly....house fire perhaps, and the wood absorbed the smoke/odor. May need to dance another jig and put on some new furniture. That'll take care of the odor problem.

BSA1
February 18, 2013, 10:34 PM
First of all what does it smell like?

A strong smoke smell would raise concern on my part if the gun has been in a fire. Face it for $100.00 that gun has a questionable history.

I would clean it first outdoors with kerosene or alcohol to get to bare metal and clean the wood and then triple my money by reselling it.

jamesbeat
February 18, 2013, 10:44 PM
When I lived in the UK, I had a deactivated AKM that smelled like that; like it had been in a fire or had been sitting near a wood stove for a long time.

I got rid of the smell by putting it through the dishwasher!

I broke it down into as many pieces as possible and put it in the dishwasher.

The dishwasher detergents stripped the metal parts of all oil and grease, which was what was holding the smell. I oiled it up and it smelled of brand new oil, nothing else.

The dishwasher also stripped the stock of all of its finish.
A lot of people warn against this, and I would normally use a less harsh method myself, but this was a desparate situation.
Once stripped, 90% of the smell had gone from the wood. It seemed strongest on the bottom edge of the stock, so I sanded it a little to get down to fresh wood, which got rid of even more smell.
I then sprayed all the wood with Frebreeze, and left it outside for a couple of days to air out (it was summer).
The smell was almost all gone by that point, and when I applied a few coats of shellac, it disappeared forever.

Hope that helps, I know how nauseating and pervasive the smell can be...

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 10:49 PM
rcmodel,

I'll give it a whirl and see if it helps. The bluing and finish is perfect on this gun so I don't think it was in a house fire, if so, it was well away from any heat.

The guy I bought it off of said he has had since it was bought new in 01. He is a smoker and lives in a small house trailer, im about 90% positive he heats it with a woodburning stove.

The-Reaver
February 18, 2013, 10:50 PM
I'd say leave it. That's character IMO

flatlander937
February 18, 2013, 10:53 PM
What about taking the wood off and having it placed in a "hot tank" like what most automotive shops/engine building shops/etc might have for a little while?

I think as others have stated, I'd focus more on the wood than the steel, though I might consider taking it apart and baking the metal parts in an oven at the lowest possible temp. I managed to pull a thread up about that here:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=166938

edit: and the whole time I was reading this I couldn't help but think of the smelly car episode of Seinfeld:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-pEhqiCD27E

:)

rcmodel
February 18, 2013, 10:57 PM
Thats all well and good if he wants to remove every trace of stock finish right down to bare stripped wood.

But I don't think he wants to do that quite yet.

There are other less invasive things to try first before stripping all the finish off and starting over.

rc

Steel Horse Rider
February 18, 2013, 10:58 PM
As stated in #11, spray it with Febreze and wipe it down. I would also completely remove the action and barrel from the stock, wipe down and oil the metal parts, scrub the wood with Murphy's Oil Soap, and then do the Febreze trick. The smell should be gone..

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 11:01 PM
Ill deal with the smell or buy a ramline before I strip the stock down. Im a welder/fabricator, wood work is out of my expertise.

blaisenguns
February 18, 2013, 11:02 PM
Just like the title says.

I bought a used 336c with the JM stamp. I bought it for a song and a dance ($100), but man does it smell like a camp fire something awful. I mean just handling the gun leaves me smelling like an all nighter at a bon fire.

It is smelling up my safe, what can I do to get this smell off without damaging anything?

Well I find that guns that have been cold blued smell like cat urine, but that does not seem to be the case.

The dishwasher detergents stripped the metal parts of all oil and grease, which was what was holding the smell. I oiled it up and it smelled of brand new oil, nothing else.


I think dishwasher soaps have lye in them, I use that and hot water when cleaning BP guns, and when I use corrosive blanks. Don't let your gun sit with this stuff on it though, because it will destroy the finish. I would suggest completely disassembling the gun, and cleaning it like normal, then cleaning it with a powerful degreaser (RC Mentioned mineral spirits, I like TruStrip, or Everclear) then wash the gun out with hot water, then wipe down again with oil and reassemble. If it is stuck in the wood then it would likely go away if you sanded it down and re-finished it (MinWax products work OK). If you do all that you will have new gun smell :)

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 11:03 PM
Im gonna hit the dollar store after work tomorrow and grab some fabreze. I believe the smell is in the wood, but just to be sure, I will separate the stock/forearm, from the receiver and barrel, put them in seperate rooms overnight and pin point the odor.

BHP FAN
February 18, 2013, 11:10 PM
For a hundred bucks you got a ''steal''. Do what ever it takes to make you happy, but I'd shoot some black powder rounds through it to mark it with a nice ''new'' smell....

bill3424
February 18, 2013, 11:14 PM
What exactly does it smell like? I'd strip it down and give it a complete cleaning. Ozone room is a good suggestion.

beeenbag
February 18, 2013, 11:18 PM
For a hundred bucks you got a ''steal''.

Yeah, its weird how it worked out. This guy has fallen upon hard times, he tried selling it to me for $350. I told him I didn't need it but would help him find a buyer. Later in the day me, him, and another neighbor were all working together and we get to talking about it and he tells me to make him an offer. I told him I didn't need it and the best I could do was the $100 I had in my wallet and him keep the ammo, had around 45 rounds with it. The next day he came to the house and said he really needed the money and would take the $100. I got a bill of sale with his name, signature, date, and DL # on it just to be sure.

Ian Sean
February 18, 2013, 11:21 PM
Ozone chamber.
Ozone?...O3?....really?

Ozone is an oxidizer and if you don't want to turn it into a sewer pipe with a wooden stock, keep ozone, bleach or any other oxidizer away from it.

musicman10_1
February 18, 2013, 11:43 PM
Wipe it down with Ballistol. Inside and out - go heavy and then repeat.

jamesbeat
February 19, 2013, 12:33 AM
I think dishwasher soaps have lye in them...

Yes they do, which is why putting greasy metal through a dishwasher gets rid of the grease so well.
Aside from the AKM that I put through the dishwasher, it's not something I do routinely, but I do use lye to clean cosmoline off of milsurps .

I use Drano granules, which also contain lye (AKA caustic soda or Sodium Hydroxide) and dunk the metal parts of the gun in it for a few minutes.
I usually give the parts a gentle scrub with a toothbrush then dunk them again for a few more minutes.

A thorough flushing with very hot water and an oil bath later, and the metal parts look and smell like they are brand new.

You have to be careful dealing with lye, but I use it instead of even nastier stuff like flammable solvents etc, so I think overall it's safer.

I've left parts in it overnight by accident, and the bluing was unaffected.

If I ever find myself in the financial position to collect milsurps on a larger scale, I'll get a piece of PVC pipe long enough to hold a barreled action and make a lye dipping tank.

r1derbike
February 19, 2013, 01:59 AM
Ballistol...yes! Then it will smell like licorice and your sweaty underwear, but it will be clean!

I use ballistol. It it good stuff. Mineral oil based, use it on all my long guns and sidearms, for minor cleaning chores outside the barrels, and of course a lubricant. Safe on wood too.

bdgackle
February 19, 2013, 02:47 AM
A word of caution -- if it HAS been in a house fire, and the metal got hotter than about 300-400 degrees (F), there is a good chance that the temper of the steel could have been changed. There are lots of other things that might cause the smell, but that one is worth considering.

I'd at least take off the wood and look at the inside. Wood begins to char at about the same temperature that hardened steel begins to soften -- any sign of burning in there and I'd be very cautious. If the magazine follower is plastic (can't remember if they are or not on that gun), I'd examine that for any sign that melting happened. Weakened springs are another good thing to look for. If you see any sign that the gun was heated in a fire, you’ll want to very carefully consider whether it is safe to fire.

As far as smell, you might try sticking JUST the wood in the safe for a few days, and then just the gun with wood removed. That way, you can see which one is stinking up your safe. Then you’ll know what to focus your cleaning efforts on.

If it’s the metal, you might try removing anything oil based from the metal by washing all the metal parts in hot water with soap (Dawn works well too). If you live someplace that has soft (and thus slightly acidic) water, mixing some baking soda in with the wash water will help prevent flash rust. Dry right away, and get some oil back on the metal. Acetone will accomplish the same, but it is more toxic and costs more. If the “smell” is dissolved in a coating of oil-based compounds on/in the metal, then oil based solvents like CLP won’t clean them off.

As far as lye goes, ANY soap will have lye added to the mixture when it was made, but if made properly, there should be no lye remaining. This is an acid-base reaction -- the fat is the acid (along with left over glycerin), and the lye is the base. If mixed in the proper quantities, all the lye should be neutralized. Dawn isn’t quite soap, but it’s based on sodium lauryl sulfate, which is in most ways similar. The idea here is to make it so that water can dissolve oil based compounds.

The drain cleaners DO contain lye – they work through a different mechanism. In this case, you would actually be MAKING something similar to soap out of the oily compounds on the guns and the lye in the Drano. This is why slightly alkali stuff is slippery – it turns the oils on your skin into a thin layer of soap. It is also how concentrated bases like drain cleaners can horribly injure you – they turn the layer of fat UNDER your skin into soap, and off comes the skin. Drano also contains significant amounts of plain old salt (it's a by-product of modern methods of manufacturing lye by running electricity through salt water) -- so make sure you rinse it all off with fresh water.

316SS
February 19, 2013, 03:11 AM
Perhaps a smoker owned it??

Wash everything you can get to with mineral spirits.

Then if that don't do any good, spray the wood with Febreze and wipe it off several times.

This. Only don't just wash everything you can get to. Remove the stocks and submerge it if you can. The odor of smoke is oil soluble and is most likely in all the lubricant on the gun.

My experience with Febreze is that it is temporary. I once drove a work truck in which a previous employee had allowed a tomcat to ... relieve itself. I would soak the seat with Febreze every weekend but it would reek again by Wednesday.

ridgerunner1965
February 19, 2013, 07:54 AM
if you take the stock off you could try putting it in a paper bag and covering it with a few lbs of coffee.leave it for a week or two and see what happens. we used to use coffee to absorb smells inside reefer trailers.

Jim, West PA
February 19, 2013, 08:11 AM
The smell of smoke is pretty hard to eliminate. So is stink bug smell. Soap just doesn't wash it off your skin.
Soooo, with that in mind. Give this a try. ( this works instantly for stink bug stench)
Use hand sanitizer. Put some on your hands and quickly rub the wood down with your wet hands.

if you take the stock off you could try putting it in a paper bag and covering it with a few lbs of coffee
Good idea ridgerunner, if it doesn't fully work, worst case, when he closes his eyes, it'll smell like he's sittin next to a camp fire sippin coffee with his rifle on his lap.

TheDaywalkersDad
February 19, 2013, 08:40 AM
I had to check the OP's name to see if it's a friend of mine. Some one that I know bought an M74 a few weeks ago and was complaining that it stunk up his safe. I guess it's more common that I thought.

ApacheCoTodd
February 19, 2013, 11:19 AM
Simply put your options are:
Pull the smell out
Lock the smell in
Cover the smell up
Neutralize the smell

Pull it - I'd try cat litter in a closed container but not too long. Baking soda.
Lock it in - Spar varnish.
Cover it up - that's girly and probably involves scents equally objectionable.
Neutralize it - Febreeze, really! Vinegar and we've used this stiff too: http://www.scoe10x.com/scripts/VideoReviews.asp

fdashes
February 19, 2013, 11:29 AM
I'll gladly give you your 100 dollars back and take care of the smell myself :D

ol' scratch
February 19, 2013, 11:56 AM
My Dad has a Winchester Model 42 that went through a house fire. It has that burned campfire smell too. He has had it for almost 20 years and it still smells like that. I would be weary of shooting it until someone checks it out if I were you. That said, I don't really know what you can do to clean that smell out.

ball3006
February 19, 2013, 12:25 PM
When you are done, clean it with Hoppe's. That will make it smell good.....When I open my safe, the smell of cosmoline waifs over me. I sure do love that smell.....chris3

youngda9
February 19, 2013, 12:29 PM
Coat it in cosmoline...problem solved.

Poper
February 19, 2013, 01:12 PM
I've used "What Odor" to remove odors of all kinds, including stale tobacco smoke. It doesn't leave any cover-up smell behind.

http://www.whatproducts.com/

Just a thought.

Poper

Averageman
February 19, 2013, 09:18 PM
Take the wood off and strip it, take it all the way down to the bare wood.
Put the now stripped wood in a paper sack with a cheap pound of coffee, place the paper sack in a plastic bag and sit the whole mess inside yopur truck on the dash where the sun will hit it over the weekend.
End of smell.
Coffee will take the smell out of the wood and any oils will be aborabed by the papersack, plastic bag just keeps the whole thing "Brewing" if you will and keeps the oils off your dash.
The only downside is every time you drive your truck for a while you may have a strange Donut craving.
This will also give you time to go over all of your metal and clean it well and do a close check for anything that needs looked at, adjusted or replaced.

19-3Ben
February 19, 2013, 10:33 PM
One time I bought some Hogue monogrips (wood ones) used. When I opened the box, the absolute rank stink of cigarette smoke made me instantly nauseous. The grips were so stinky it was unbelievable. I tried Murphy's oil soap... nada. Tried wiping with alcohol...nothing. Mineral spirits... nothing.

I eventually had to wet-sand them down past the finish with mineral spirits and wet/dry sandpaper and completely refinish them. It was only by completely removing the top layer of wood and resealing them that I finally got that smell out of them. These were seriously bad.

skeeziks
February 19, 2013, 10:40 PM
Please let us know how the Febreeze works out. I may try it on something I have sitting in my garage that smells of smoke.

beeenbag
February 19, 2013, 10:45 PM
I didn't get to make it to the dollar store today, I'll have to get there tomorrow.

phonesysphonesys
February 20, 2013, 02:04 AM
Clean it with Hoppes. Coat it real good. If that doen't get rid of it at least it will be a turn on for your wife (girl friend). Works for me.
Semper Fi

Fishslayer
February 20, 2013, 02:53 AM
Perhaps a smoker owned it??

rc

I've actually heard of old milsurp rifles having a strong tobacco odor in the stocks. I imagine some of those old Mosins have sat in on a few all night wodka benders... ;)

kBob
February 20, 2013, 09:47 PM
About '68 I was playing with a Mosin M44 that was an early VN MAAP bring back. It smelled awful. I took it apart and out of the wood and it smelled worse. Like something dead. There were stains in the wood where something had seeped in between the handguards and fore stock.

The actual owner who had loaned me the gun for a class in exchange for "a good cleaning" laughed when I told him his rifle had gagged me.

Thus my first experience with Nhuc Mon.............

-kBob

crow killer
February 21, 2013, 12:15 AM
Get a product called "Natures Miracle" from your pet store, it's a natural enzyme that will clean and neutralize nasty odors. I have used it on wood and it works great. Also works good on beagles after rolling in deer pooh.

Swampman
February 21, 2013, 12:51 AM
This isn't really on topic since the OP has stated that he's not planning on refinishing the stock, but I'd still like to warn anyone who's considering using the dishwasher cleaning method.

DO NOT put any anodized aluminum parts in the dishwasher.

I'm not gonna admit exactly how I learned this, but I will say that I used to own a Mossberg 500 12 gauge with a metallic purple receiver. :uhoh:

sleepyone
February 21, 2013, 12:09 PM
I bought a truck that had been owned by a HEAVY smoking couple. It was a rare model. I thought I could get rid of the smell. I rented an ozone machine for two weeks and ran it in cycles in my garage. I shampooed, handscrubbed and sprayed every cloth, plastic and metal surface multiple times. Put the aerosol spray through the intake and supply air vents multiple times. I tried every trick known to mankind. NOTHING worked. The best I did was create a different smell that was just as bad. Lost my **s on that truck. Never again will I purchase ANYTHING that has a smell that is foreign to that object. There are too many cars, trucks, guns etc. out there to jack with it.

CZguy
February 21, 2013, 01:30 PM
Never again will I purchase ANYTHING that has a smell that is foreign to that object. There are too many cars, trucks, guns etc. out there to jack with it.

I know what you mean, but the OP got a Marlin 336 for a hundred dollars. I would have bought it at that price too. It's much easier to get the smell out of a gun, than a truck.

sleepyone
February 21, 2013, 03:14 PM
It's much easier to get the smell out of a gun, than a truck.

I hope so. Most likely he will unless it was in a house fire and exposed to extreme temps for a prolonged time. In that case, the smoke has permeated every part of that gun and the heat could have compromised the metal like some have suggested.

MCgunner
February 21, 2013, 05:01 PM
My first thought was fired with black powder and wasn't cleaned. That would not be a good thing. :D

I had a stainless Ruger Old Army I cleaned in the dish washer all the time. I've not tried it with my blued cap and ball guns. I guess, perhaps, Cascade would strip the bluing? Hmm, good thing I haven't tried it.

DO NOT put any anodized aluminum parts in the dishwasher.

Wow, the ROA's grip frame is aluminum. Thanks for THAT heads up. It's a dirty job, but I guess I'll keep hand washing the cap and ball stuff.

scchokedaddy
February 22, 2013, 02:10 AM
My wife suggests sealing wood part in a plastic bag with dryer sheets. Don't ask me, I'm just following orders on this. She says she has had good results removing bad odors from everything from clothes to cars to furniture by doing this. She says check it in 2-3 days or bettr let it sit in bag for a week. I don't know, like I said just......well after 35 years yall know what I mean. Good luck

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