reloading kit


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Rem700CDLSF3006
February 19, 2013, 09:32 PM
am wanting to get back into reloading am looking at 2 kits the RCBS Rockchucker and the Hornady lock and load had a previous rockchucker dont know anything about the Hornady Lock and load

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va1911
February 19, 2013, 09:34 PM
They're completely different. Do you want single stage or a progressive? Or in between like a turret?

Rem700CDLSF3006
February 19, 2013, 09:39 PM
i want a single stage

rcmodel
February 19, 2013, 09:42 PM
RCBS.

Lock & Load is a gimmick you don't need.

Once adjusted and the lock rings locked, dies stay adjusted forever, and it takes all of 30 seconds to screw one out and another one in it's place.

If you have a problem with any of it 25 years later?
RCBS will replace it no questions ask.

rc

Rem700CDLSF3006
February 19, 2013, 09:46 PM
I was mostly wondering about the durability of the Hornady Is it as solid as the Rockchucker and also 50 $ less

rcmodel
February 19, 2013, 10:08 PM
I have no idea.

My RCBS Rock Chucker is only 43 years old and still going strong.
So I haven't needed to replace it with a Hornady L&L to see if they will last 43 years and still be going strong too.

On the other hand, I will be ashes to ashes well before another 43 years, so I will never know.

rc

Red is Dead
February 19, 2013, 10:17 PM
They're completely different. Do you want single stage or a progressive? Or in between like a turret?
Lock N Load is a single stage Lock N Load AP is the progressive

Fights Fires
February 19, 2013, 10:21 PM
Sure could use some help, I just took delivery of a LaRue 7.62 OBR (16'' barrel). I am going to get into reloading, I don't know much about reloading. I would like to purchase Redding reloading equiptment, anyone have any experence with Redding? Please tell me which Redding to buy,only want to buy once. Thank You for the help.

Lost Sheep
February 19, 2013, 11:18 PM
Sure could use some help, I just took delivery of a LaRue 7.62 OBR (16'' barrel). I am going to get into reloading, I don't know much about reloading. I would like to purchase Redding reloading equiptment, anyone have any experence with Redding? Please tell me which Redding to buy,only want to buy once. Thank You for the help.
How did you settle on Redding? Other brands are quite good: Forster, Lee (the Classic Cast Single Stage is a FAR CRY from Lee's cheaper aluminum presses), RCBS, Hornady, Lyman immediately come to mind, but there are others, too.

Any other calibers you will be reloading?

What kind of quantities will you reload?

What are your goals? Hunting, Competition? Long-distance ultimate accuracy (though, I could guess a 16" barrel should tell me)? Casual target shooting?

How much room (square feet) do you have to devote to your loading area? Will it be dedicated or shared with other activities?

Will you leave your gear set up all the time or put it away when not in use?

What's your budget?

The more we know about your needs, the more accurate and useful our information will be.

Thanks for asking our advice. I have a long list of threads you could consult, but not here (I am at work right now). "The ABC's of Reloading" is where I would start reading, though, and your local library probably has one.

Lost Sheep

beatledog7
February 19, 2013, 11:26 PM
I like my LNL SS, and I don't consider the system to be a gimmick. I find it really useful. To each his own.

Certaindeaf
February 19, 2013, 11:35 PM
You'd want to get a Lee.

GT1
February 20, 2013, 01:52 AM
My RCBS Rock Chucker is only 43 years old and still going strong.

Yep, unfortunately RCBS has not updated the design and nothing has changed in 43 years.

I'd advise anyone buying a new press to step into the modern era and at least buy a press that doesn't spit used primers all over the floor. Whether one uses the bushings(Or just leaves it in and screws and unscrews the old fashioned way), or buys a press without bushings, whatever.

Fights Fires
February 20, 2013, 02:38 AM
First to everyone who responded thank you.I may also reload 45 acp at sometime,As to how much I will reload (quantities) if I can load 200-300 rounds in a couple of weeks that would be about it.For now I am only shooting paper, may want to shoot competiton if I feel that I would be good enough.I have pretty much all the room that I would need(all of basement).I will also leave the reloading equipment set up.Budget,I figure if I buy, buy the best once.I would be ok with about 1500.00 if possible.(budget) I was once told Redding was one of the better reloading equipment. Thank you for your help.

ArchAngelCD
February 20, 2013, 02:41 AM
I'm in the RCBS Rockchucker camp too. The press is excellent as is their customer service is second to none on the odd chance you need to use it...

GT1
February 20, 2013, 03:00 AM
I would be ok with about 1500.00 if possible.

You should be able to get a very nice set up for about a third of that. And while Redding is a premium priced brand it is no better nor worse than several other brands.

nhhillbilly
February 20, 2013, 03:08 AM
Reloading press. For my bolt action rifles I went with the Redding R7 turret press. I have found I really like this press. I also have two older Hornaday progressives. What I like about the Redding is I set the dies up and leave it. Redding have been great with customer service when I damaged one of my dies by setting it too low. I told them it was my mistake and they replaced the part for free anyway.

Now for automatic powder measure I looked and played with the PACT and found it to be a bit difficult to set up. I read reviews on line and saw several had issues with it. I went the RCBS and love it. I haven't had any problems. One of my best purchases. I beats using a powder dump and checking with a balance scale by light years.

Lost Sheep
February 20, 2013, 03:21 AM
First to everyone who responded thank you.I may also reload 45 acp at sometime,As to how much I will reload (quantities) if I can load 200-300 rounds in a couple of weeks that would be about it.For now I am only shooting paper, may want to shoot competiton if I feel that I would be good enough.I have pretty much all the room that I would need(all of basement).I will also leave the reloading equipment set up.Budget,I figure if I buy, buy the best once.I would be ok with about 1500.00 if possible.(budget) I was once told Redding was one of the better reloading equipment. Thank you for your help.
A single stage press would let you load about 50-60 rounds an hour comfortably, but you can get a really first-class setup for well under $500 will all kinds of bells and whistles and everything you could possibly need if you don't go too extravagant.

A good turret press similarly set up would set you back about a hundred more, but has the added convenience and speed of not having to swap dies when you swap calibers. Also, the added flexibility of being able to process continuously instead of in batches. You can double your speed processing continuously instead of in batch. With the Lee Classic Turret (unarguably the best 4-station auto-indexing turret in current production) you can triple your single-stage production.

With a budget of $1500 and an eye toward competition where quantities of 1,000 rounds a week might be reasonable, I would think a progressive could be in your future. But I would recommend a progressive IN ADDITION TO and LATER than a single stage or turret. Besides, a single stage press is in the stable of almost every serious loader I know.

Redding is the prince of quality presses. Possibly overkill in quality. Hornady, Lyman, RCBS are great presses. Not as finely finished as Redding, but every bit as good where it counts, rigidity, durability, reliability, strength. Forster Co-Ax is possibly the finest single stage press ever made. (I admit that there may be differing, and valid, opinions on the Forster vs Redding evaluation. I just want to mention that Forster is worth a look, but is often overlooked.) The Lee Classic Cast has some innovative features that put it above some far more expensive presses, but Lee's bargain reputation has led some people to deny Lee's better models the high regard they are due. So don't leave Lee out of the candidate pool.

Sorry for rambling. My advice in short: Study up on loading processes and shop around, examining ALL makers' tools. Looking over how you describe your needs, my recommendation for your first press would be Lee Classic Cast single stage or Lee Classic Turret and a progressive later, when you feel the need and have determined your loading "style" and taste for gear.

If you go for the single stage press or just about any turret press but Lee's, the Redding dies are said to be smoother-running, which you will appreciate for the bottle-necked cartridges. However, the Lee rifle dies have some intriguing features. If you go for the Lee Classic Turret, the Lee Pistol Dies work best, but probably anyone's rifle dies will do, so Lee or Redding for that.

Please PM me if you want more details. I don't want to sidetrack this thread any further. We might want to create a new thread to let others (whose opinions may vary from mine, so are well worth reading) weigh in.

Lost Sheep

hueyville
February 20, 2013, 03:23 AM
+5 for the rock chuckers. That's how many I own.

ColtPythonElite
February 20, 2013, 03:34 AM
I like my LnL AP, but that is another story.

I bought a Rock Chucker Master kit 20+ years ago and don't regret it one bit.

Fights Fires
February 21, 2013, 09:14 AM
I'm sorry guys if I posted in the wrong thread,new at this, thanks to all.

kingmt
February 21, 2013, 10:36 AM
Not a problem. So many people asking the same questions it is nice to take care of two at the same time.

ArchAngelCD
February 21, 2013, 11:04 AM
I posted above I'm a fan of the RCBS Rockchucker and stand by that post but since we are now talking about loading 45 Auto ammo I will mention I also own a Lee CLASSIC 4 Hole Turret Press. I still use my RCBS press for rifle ammo but really like the Lee turret press for handgun ammo. I can safely load 180 to 200 rounds per hour of quality ammo. I use both but if handgun ammo is all I loaded I think I would want the turret press over a single stage if I could only buy one press. Even if you do load an occasional rifle round you can remove the auto-index rod and use the Lee turret press as a single stage press. The Classic turret press is heavy enough to load most rifle ammo.

I you load a lot of rifle ammo and "some" handgun ammo then I think the Rockchucker is best.

rsnell
February 21, 2013, 12:53 PM
I have been using a Forster Co-Ax press for about 30 years and have never had a problem. This is a very strong single stage press and does not require a shellholder. Most of my loading is for rifles but some is for a .41 Remington Magnum. If you get into handgun competition, look at the Dillon line.

KansasSasquatch
February 21, 2013, 04:00 PM
I think anyone who is looking for a single stage, but is possibly going to reload for pistol and rifle cartridges, a good turret press is the most logical choice. You can run it as a single stage if you wish or run out a completed round without changing out dies. I bought my first press a year ago, it being a Hornady LNL AP. I don't regret it because at the time my main goal was producing pistol plinking ammo and .223 plinking ammo. It has served it's purpose well but now I'm looking to get into some bigger rifle cartridges. I don't think a progressive is the way to go for that. But I've been using a Lee hand press for some rifle cartridges but FOR ME loading on a single stage isn't something I want to keep doing for big rifle rounds. I see a turret in my future.

whipper
February 21, 2013, 05:41 PM
Yep, unfortunately RCBS has not updated the design and nothing has changed in 43 years.

Why mess with perfection :D

NeuseRvrRat
February 22, 2013, 10:26 AM
RCBS has actually made several changes to the Rockchucker. the handle is now angled outward and you can move it to either side. the end of the handle is now a ball instead of a bicycle grip. the spent primer collector was changed significantly. the on-press priming device is also different than it was 50 years ago.

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