Glock 19 "Compensated" Opinions on Using It for CCW?


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gerrym526
March 1, 2013, 09:20 PM
My wife shot and fell in love with a Glock 19 (gen 3) at a CCW class we took.

In my neighborhood (Socialist Republic of Illinois) 19's of any sort are impossible to find (long backorders). Did find one available at a gunstore I've done business with before-trust them-it's a Gen 3 with a Compensator. Assume they mean the barrel ports that reduce recoil pressure. Up to now my understanding of compensated barrels was that they were typically installed on guns that were going to be used for competitive shooting (e.g. IDPA).
This gun would be my wife's CCW, so I don't really want a "tricked out" target model.
Any help on whether this might be the right gun for her would be appreciated. She's learning how to shoot (NRA instructor course), so not very experienced but the greatly reduced recoil has her very excited in the learning process.
Or, should I just order a standard model 19 Gen 4 and wait a few months for it-not in a big hurry.

Thanks for the help guys.
Gerry

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EBShooting
March 1, 2013, 11:56 PM
I would try to get one with a non-ported barrel. Remember, that flash is going to be directly in front of your line of sight. If you shoot it at night, there goes your night vision.

Bovice
March 2, 2013, 12:04 AM
Ported barrels of any kind are not permitted in IDPA. But, if you have a G19C and want the functional equivalent of a standard G19, just put in a standard barrel.

mljdeckard
March 2, 2013, 01:10 AM
Yep. try it at night before you decide.

Takem406
March 2, 2013, 01:33 AM
I would try to get one with a non-ported barrel. Remember, that flash is going to be directly in front of your line of sight. If you shoot it at night, there goes your night vision.

Except the guys who own C model Glocks and actually shoot them say this is not an issue. Besides if it's that dark you'll have your flashlight out as well. And if you get jumped at night the BG will most likely be close enough that you'll have to shoot "retention style" from the hip. Your pistol is canted outward so no port flare will get you and you won't get blinded...

I'm buying a 23c. I've spent the past week researching them.

It seems like there's a lot of BS from people who haven't shot them who are speculating about possible bogus problems.

But there's several good YouTube movies and I've even seen cops writing on the C models. They bust all the myths.

I'm really excited to get mine in the next couple weeks and see what they are about.

Less muzzle flip? Heck yeah Ill go for that. That means faster double taps and funner range time. I'm actually excited to let my wifey shoot my 23c when I get it. From what I've seen on YouTube they are tamed to like a soft 9mm. Not bad for a 40!

Glory to America has an excellent movie on YouTube!

One guy tested to see how much energy is lost with a ported barrel. It's like 6 percent. Not a big deal for me because my defense loads are already going at 1400. But it was a cool well did movie.

A 19C "should" be a really soft gun to shoot! You can always trade it or buy a standard barrel.

Good luck!

In God and Glock we Trust

Inebriated
March 2, 2013, 01:34 AM
Yeah, it'll have some flash, but as long as the grip is concealable, another half-inch on the end of the barrel won't really affect concealability, IMO.

ljnowell
March 2, 2013, 01:39 AM
I've owned ported semi-autos and shot them in the dark. The flash people describe is greatly exaggerated.

More than likely its a factory comp'd gun, so no barrel sticking out past slide, at least no more than usual.

Inebriated
March 2, 2013, 01:49 AM
The flash people describe is greatly exaggerated.
Yes, but it's still something to be mindful of.

More than likely its a factory comp'd gun, so no barrel sticking out past slide, at least no more than usual.

You're probably right, didn't think about that.

Snowdog
March 2, 2013, 05:30 AM
Man, that recoil and flip on the G19 is something fierce!

No, I would recommend against anything compensated unless we're talking a 3" .357magnum snub or some such beast.

I have fired a compensated Glock 19 and found it offered incredibly little over the G19 I owned at the time.

HKGuns
March 2, 2013, 08:39 AM
A ported 9mm may just be the stupidest thing I've ever heard.

CDW4ME
March 2, 2013, 09:53 AM
I have a 19c and wouldn't worry about carrying it for SD.

Muzzle flash (whether compensated or not) varies with different brands, some have more than others.

I have not shot my 19c at low light; but, I did shoot my 30SF (45 acp) and my handload with AA#5 produced a noticeable flash, but some Remington "green box" fired a minute later did not.

I guess a person could get burned by gases from the ports if the pistol was against your body, but that would go both ways and your attacker could also get burned from a contact shot.

The ports reduce recoil and velocity; generally speaking, my 19C produces about the same velocity as a Glock 26. If I carried it, I would load it with Ranger T 124 gr. +P or 127 gr. +P+ so velocity wouldn't be lacking.

Here is a link where someone posted a pic of shooting a compensated Glock in a indoor range, you can see what the flash actually looks like.

http://www.glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1458618&highlight=19c

Charles S
March 2, 2013, 10:02 AM
It seems like there's a lot of BS from people who haven't shot them who are speculating about possible bogus problems.

But there's several good YouTube movies and I've even seen cops writing on the C models. They bust all the myths.

I cannot imagine a well trained police officer using any ported pistol.

The flash is not a problem.

The problem arises when you train...I assume you train... for different scenarios.

One of the positions I have been trained to shoot from in multiple corses is called the retention position. I hope I never have to shoot from that position, but statistics show a large number of confrontations take place at contact distance.

I would never shoot a compensated or ported pistol from the retention position. Nor would I recommend anyone else try it.

If the gun is not for self defense...then fine. If it is consider that. A course or two in the use of a handgun for self defense is quite enlightening. It shows a lot of what the "expert" gun writers worry about are irrelevant. :fire:

I really enjoy a shooting course.

Shipwreck
March 2, 2013, 10:10 AM
Yes, I agree with Charles on the retention position issue. He beat me to it...

dprice3844444
March 2, 2013, 10:15 AM
i have 2 and have shot them in low light conditions,you cannot see the flash,it happens so quickly,your eye cannot detect anything let alone react to the light.with the advent of today's powders,flash is minimal.where the comp gun really shines is double/triple taps.minimal rise.if you have a dd214,try a police distributor as you can prob get police price on it

David E
March 2, 2013, 10:28 AM
I cannot imagine a well trained police officer using any ported pistol.

You should get out more, and/or do some research into the matter.

I would never shoot a compensated or ported pistol from the retention position.

I have. Not a biggie.

Nor would I recommend anyone else try it.

Your idle speculation on the matter is not supported by the facts.

(Take) a course or two in the use of a handgun for self defense. It shows a lot of what the "expert" gun writers worry about are irrelevant. :fire:


Yeah, even the "experts" that post their idly speculated opinions on the Internet that have no basis in fact. :rolleyes:

OP, I'd rather get a gun NOW (especially a hicap, especially in Illinois) even if it's a ported "C" model. Use quality ammo for defense and the flash concern goes away. Practice in low light so you/she knows what to expect so you/she can ignore it. Tuck the elbow into your side keeping the wrist straight and fire a few rds, as that'll dispel the needless concerns of firing a "C" model from the retention position. If the port blast isn't something you want to deal with, you can always get an unported barrel later.

If its a FACTORY correct Glock 19-C get the gun now. It'll say 19-C on the slide. If it started out as a regular Glock and now has ports or an added/bolted on compensator, keep looking.

Jim Watson
March 2, 2013, 10:29 AM
...a Compensator. Assume they mean the barrel ports that reduce recoil pressure.

Why are you assuming anything? Have you not seen the gun?
A factory G19C has holes in the barrel and slots in the slide.
That is OK. Port flash is overrated; a shooter here - a very well trained LEO with a famous agency - uses one. Shooting indoors I see that the port flash with good quality ammo is no worse than muzzle flash with cheap ammo, if that. And he doesn't complain about getting singed by the flash.

If she found it undesirable for some reason, a straight barrel will drop right in.

If the gun in question has an add on muzzle brake compensator, give it a pass. Who knows what other tinkering might have been done.

Charles S
March 2, 2013, 10:57 AM
You should get out more, and/or do some research into the matter.

I get out quite a bit and have shot a fair number of training courses. No city or state agency in Texas, Louisiana, or Arkansas issues ported weapons. Feel free to cite an agency that does.

I would never shoot a compensated or ported pistol from the retention position.


I have. Not a biggie.

In one course I took we shot down a simulated hallway with our carry gun and ammo combo. We shot this with, of course, hearing and eye protection. It was an eye opener. I found there was a noticeable difference in what I felt with a high pressure round and a low pressure round.

Tuck the elbow into your side keeping the wrist straight and fire a few rds, as that'll dispel the needless concerns of firing a "C" model from the retention position. If the port blast isn't something you want to deal with, you can always get an unported barrel later.

To be realistic try that in a closed in space not a range with no ceiling. I saw ceiling material raining down after shooting short barred 357. I cannot imagine shooting a ported weapon inside. Especially without hearing protection.

Yeah, even the "experts" that post their idly speculated opinions on the Internet that have no basis in fact.

I have never claimed to be an expert, but I have shot under a number of people who do claim to be. With the experience to back it. When the question came up in class, not a single instructor I have been under including some names you might recognize recommended it.

Of course you may know more than the late Cirrilo, the enjoyable Mr. Ayoob, Mr. Clint Smith.....

Sam1911
March 2, 2013, 11:33 AM
I've shot plenty of compensated/ported guns, both indoors and out. Some were ok. Some just crazy.

A good pal bought a heavily ported SIG 220 .45 that was so NUTS we'd call in everyone around to watch the fireworks. Looked like an unlimited-class funny car spitting a row of flames from open headers!

I don't like compensated or ported guns at all, and wouldn't choose to own one (unless some day I get into Open-class competition but that's a whole different set of questions) but if all you can find is a ported G19c, that's better than no gun at all.

Here's a video of a G19c: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EIh_8sclYOI

You can see the flame/blast very clearly. Decide for yourself if that's cool with you.

Armed 24/7
March 2, 2013, 01:57 PM
I had a Gen 2 23c about 15 years ago, and bought it brand new. I really liked it, and I wish I had never sold it to a friend of mine who just adored it. I too read all about the "blinding flash" from the ports at night. When I tried it with WWB on a moonless night with no other light around, all you see is a quick"V" of flash from the ports in addiction to the muzzle flash. I then tried it with a premium brand of HP ammo, the flash was greatly reduced to a non issue. It all comes down to the flash properties of the powder in the round.
On the Plus side, I really liked the reduced muzzle flip, and would not hesitate to get one again. I think that a 19c would be about perfect for a new shooter.

David E
March 2, 2013, 02:13 PM
I get out quite a bit and have shot a fair number of training courses. No city or state agency in Texas, Louisiana, or Arkansas issues ported weapons. Feel free to cite an agency that does.

Edmond PD in OK does.

In one course I took we shot down a simulated hallway with our carry gun and ammo combo. We shot this with, of course, hearing and eye protection. It was an eye opener. I found there was a noticeable difference in what I felt with a high pressure round and a low pressure round.

Point?

To be realistic try that in a closed in space not a range with no ceiling.

The indoor ranges I've done that at DO have ceilings.

I saw ceiling material raining down after shooting short barreled .357.

Maybe a better/newer range is in order.

I cannot imagine shooting a ported weapon inside. Especially without hearing protection.

First you argue ports suck when firing from retention, now you're arguing blast. I'd rather shoot a 23-C indoors than a snubnose magnum with full house loads.

When the question came up in class, not a single instructor I have been under including some names you might recognize recommended it.

Jim Cirillo liked lasers on his guns, but I'm sure other noted "experts" wouldn't recommend them. Did that make Jim wrong?

Of course you may know more than the late Cirrilo, the enjoyable Mr. Ayoob, Mr. Clint Smith.....

I've taken classes with Jim and Mas and others, learning quite a bit. But that doesn't mean they know everything

Look, don't get a "C" model if you don't want one. But don't cite a reason that just isn't so as your justification.

2zulu1
March 2, 2013, 04:32 PM
I cannot imagine a well trained police officer using any ported pistol.

The flash is not a problem.

The problem arises when you train...I assume you train... for different scenarios.

One of the positions I have been trained to shoot from in multiple corses is called the retention position. I hope I never have to shoot from that position, but statistics show a large number of confrontations take place at contact distance.

I would never shoot a compensated or ported pistol from the retention position. Nor would I recommend anyone else try it.

If the gun is not for self defense...then fine. If it is consider that. A course or two in the use of a handgun for self defense is quite enlightening. It shows a lot of what the "expert" gun writers worry about are irrelevant. :fire:

I really enjoy a shooting course.
I have to disagree with your statement about shooting a ported barrel from retention causing whatever. Back in the day Bill Jordan's style of shooting greatly influenced our training, in fact, shooting "from the hip" was part of our POST quals.

The gases escaping, and reacting with air, through the cylinder gap of this 686P/6" greatly exceeds anything one will experience with a 9mm ported barrel.

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/357magAA9nightflash015.jpg

Notice that the gases escaping through the muzzle exhibited very low flash. Curious as to how these cylinder gap gases affected inanimate objects, I held the 686P parallel with cardboard backed paper targets. At 12" there was no effect, adjacent to the target and the gases created a ragged 6"-7" rip in the cardboard, but no burn residue on the paper target.

I expect if someone with a ported 9mm barrel anchored a swath of fabric 6" above the ports, the fabric would retain its integrity.

A Power Pistol load in 45 auto reacting with air created this huge muzzle flash;

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/45acp230grGoldenSaber74grPowerPisto.jpg

Now a full power 10mm handload with IMR 800X;

http://i1103.photobucket.com/albums/g474/aztrekker511/10mm175grSilvertip10gr800X6.jpg

As we can observe with the full power 10mm load, muzzle flash in complete darkness, same complete darkness with the above two tests, is very low. Since there is only so much powder gas that reacts with air, the V porting will reduce muzzle flash in the 10mm. The gases escaping through the ports can't increase the muzzle flash effect, in reality, flash is now witnessed at three separate locations.

For the OP, there aren't any serious drawbacks in buying the G19C for personal defense.

hentown
March 3, 2013, 10:08 AM
Yeah, it'll have some flash, but as long as the grip is concealable, another half-inch on the end of the barrel won't really affect concealability, IMO.

Have you ever seen a ported Glock?? :evil:

TonyDedo
March 3, 2013, 10:17 AM
Ported barrels aren't a great idea for CCW.

First there's the muzzle flash issue. There are plenty of tough guys out there who say it's not a problem, but I would shoot the gun and see for yourself before you buy it or try to carry it. I had a ported 1911 officer model, and it looked like a dragon in my hands (yet I noticed no difference in recoil). May not be the best thing for a new shooter.

The other problem is that if this is a defensive pistol for CCW, you may find yourself in close quarters or firing from a non traditional grip and stance, and those ports can be dangerous. This is why it's ported barrels are not permitted in IDPA.

And from a practical perspective, the added length and weight are going to make the gun less comfortable to carry, and may give you trouble coming in and out of a holster.

It may also affect resale value, as a lot of people shy away from comped barrels.

Your best bet is to either a) buy the gun and replace the barrel with a standard barrel, or b) wait for a standard Glock 19.

Charles S
March 3, 2013, 01:29 PM
There are plenty of tough guys out there who say it's not a problem, but I would shoot the gun and see for yourself before you buy it or try to carry it. I had a ported 1911 officer model, and it looked like a dragon in my hands (yet I noticed no difference in recoil). May not be the best thing for a new shooter.

That sums it up nicely. Everyone has an opinion. I would read up on what experts on self defense have to say about a ported gun and try it. I do not recommend it.

The other problem is that if this is a defensive pistol for CCW, you may find yourself in close quarters or firing from a non traditional grip and stance, and those ports can be dangerous. This is why it's ported barrels are not permitted in IDPA.

It is fine on a range, but may not be fine in real life.

Edmond PD in OK does.

:scrutiny: So you have named one. I do find it interesting that no Federal law enforcement agency chooses to. To my knowledge no State agency does, nor do the larger police departments. Maybe there is nothing to that. Let the reader be the judge.

To my knowledge no well known trainer or defense expert recommends a ported handgun. Although I will qualify that with the fact that I have limited resources and rarely take more than one class a year and although I have an extensive library on the subject I may be missing a will known expert.... Again, let the reader decide.

First you argue ports suck when firing from retention, now you're arguing blast. I'd rather shoot a 23-C indoors than a snubnose magnum with full house loads.


Maybe I did not articulate my position well, but is has always been about blast. Ports suck from a retention position because the blast is directed at your face. I agree with you however and after my class where we shot in a three dimensional indoors "house" with ceilings I changed a lot about what I do. Prior to that I often carried a Ruger SP101 with full house loads. I now use that more for hiking and woods carry now.

As for flash... after my very first night course I realized muzzle flash as a reason not to choose a gun was overstated. A shooter can use his flash to refine his sight picture. There are of course down sides also.

Jim Cirillo liked lasers on his guns, but I'm sure other noted "experts" wouldn't recommend them. Did that make Jim wrong?

I think LASERS are a useful tool as long as they don't become a crutch. I honestly thing Mr. Cirillo was ahead of his time. LASERS are used in close quarters combat by our military now.

Look, don't get a "C" model if you don't want one. But don't cite a reason that just isn't so as your justification.

I own a ported Glock 40 long slide and a Glock 23. To say there is not an increased blast with the ported gun is just not true. My justification is too much muzzle blast, but then again....
2zulu1,

Great pics, but hardly scientific. On the general post I agree, but that is why I don't carry a 357 magnum either.

Charles

tarosean
March 3, 2013, 01:48 PM
The flash people describe is greatly exaggerated.

Depends on ammo used.

Cannot remember which magazine it was, but in a recent article they shot a revolver and a couple pistols at night. The same guns produced everything from huge fireballs to barely noticeable discharge.

ljnowell
March 3, 2013, 04:10 PM
I have to wonder what kind of axe some of you have to grind in here? Insulting a PD about thier training, calling people who own compd guns "tough guys", etc. This is about as LOW ROAD as I have seen a moderator allow on THR. Its pretty damned pathetic to be honest.

There are people here who have owned plenty of compd guns and shot them at night and never had an issue with it. Because some of you dont like them you feel the need to call people names?

Sure am glad that we are all taking the high road here and acting like mature adults.

mnhntr
March 3, 2013, 04:34 PM
I would never advise someone to carry a ported pistol or revolver of any knid for CCW. The reason is simple, you never know what position you will be in defending yourself and I would rather not suffer burns from my own gun in a fight. Think about it, you are in your car getting car jacked and fire the pistol with the muzzle inches from your face or body, no thanks, Or maybe you are on your back after being knocked down and know you are firing close to your body or arm pushing the bad guy off you and you get burned from the muzzle blast coming out the porting. I have seen quite a few of the "experts" opinions on this subject and they seem to all agree it is unecessary and dangerous. The only reason you need ported handguns is for competition or heavy recoiling hunting rigs. If you cannot handle the recoil of a pistol get a different caliber.

kgpcr
March 3, 2013, 11:03 PM
Buy it and throw in an aftermarket barrel. Done! The G19 is a great pistol

Texan Scott
March 4, 2013, 12:01 AM
2zulu1, thank you. Also, you beat to it. So far, the objections raised to ported pistols all apply to my snubby 357s... and it doesn't stop me from carrying them.

David E
March 4, 2013, 01:49 AM
Ported barrels aren't a great idea for CCW.

Many disagree with you.

First there's the muzzle flash issue.

Proper load selection eliminates this alleged concern.

I had a ported 1911 officer model, and it looked like a dragon in my hands (yet I noticed no difference in recoil).

Load selection failure and, perhaps, poor technique. Muzzle flip is minimized, when decent porting is used. Not talking about a bolt-on $39 "compensator."

if this is a defensive pistol for CCW, you may find yourself in close quarters or firing from a non traditional grip and stance, and those ports can be dangerous.

Multiple lapses of judgement in succession are required to get you into such a situation. Worst case, tilt the barrel low to direct the port blast into the badguy and close your eyes

This is why it's ported barrels are not permitted in IDPA.

Nope, they're not allowed because:

A) they are, in fact, an advantage

B) if allowed, that's all anyone would use.

And from a practical perspective, the added length and weight are going to make the gun less comfortable to carry, and may give you trouble coming in and out of a holster.

With all due respect, you don't know what you're talking about. The Glock 19-C is dimensionally identical to the non-ported Glock 19 while weighing slightly less.

David E
March 4, 2013, 02:04 AM
:scrutiny: So you have named one.

I knew you'd say that, but you only asked for me to name one.

Maybe I did not articulate my position well, but is has always been about blast. Ports suck from a retention position because the blast is directed at your face.

Except that it's not. Unless you tilt the ports toward you for some unfathomable reason

To say there is not an increased blast with the ported gun is just not true.


There is added concussion/blast, but less muzzle flip.

The OP would be well advised to buy the G19-C that's available NOW, especially living in IL, and buy a non-ported barrel later if he wants one.

okiewita40
March 4, 2013, 05:40 AM
If the OP wants the comp model he can get it. I think he should test it with different ammo and pick the one he likes best.

From what I have seen over the last 13 years as an LEO. It is all about the ammo or powder used. My old SWAT commander still carries a G22C. The only problem he has had with it is that after several mags. He gets a dirty fron sight. Kind of hard to see night sights with brunt carbon covering them.

Now in the few shots one would shoot in a SD situation I don't think that there is a lot to worry about. But I have not seen everything there is to see either.

clang
March 4, 2013, 12:20 PM
Speaking specifically about a Glock 19C - to me it is a solution looking for a problem. There is no big difference in recoil or muzzle flip between the G19 and the G19C. I've fired both with the same ammo at the same range session and did not feel much of a difference. If a 9mm is borderline too powerful for you, the Comp barrel might make a difference, but you'd probably have problems racking the slide too of most guns too.

A Compensated barrel might make a difference on more powerful cartridges or lighter guns, but the G19 does not need it.

I live in IL too - there were plenty of Glocks at the Gun Show I went to yesterday. Might not be bargain prices, but they are available.

David E
March 4, 2013, 01:22 PM
I live in IL too - there were plenty of Glocks at the Gun Show I went to yesterday. Might not be bargain prices, but they are available.

And therein lies the rub.

If I lacked and wanted a high cap 9mm and could find a 19-C at a regular price avaikable NOW vs a G-19 that was $100-$200-$300+ more than the 19-C, I'd buy the 19-C. I wouldn't want to take the chance to wait a few months (or much longer) for a 19 to again be available at MSRP, especially if I lived in IL.

clang
March 4, 2013, 02:07 PM
Have you tried Megasports in Plainfield or GAT Guns in East Dundee?

Besides, comparing the price of a used 19C to the price of a new gun is not really fair.

David E
March 4, 2013, 04:02 PM
Besides, comparing the price of a used 19C to the price of a new gun is not really fair.

Agreed, but where did the OP say the 19-C was used?

How high, exactly, were the "not a bargain " G-19 prices at that gunshow?

clang
March 4, 2013, 05:07 PM
Agreed, but where did the OP say the 19-C was used?

You are correct, I thought the OP was buying from instructor - went back and re-read 1st post.

Still, a compensated barrel on a 9mm is about as useful as mammary glands on a bull. Better to KISS (Keep Is Simple S). As mentioned already, there are some legitimate situations where it can be detrimental, but none where it is helpful.

David E
March 4, 2013, 06:32 PM
there are some legitimate situations where it can be detrimental,

The "detrimental" aspects are speculative, stated by those that haven't fired one in the positions they cite as causing a problem. The ports are a non-issue 99.9% of the time, but some like to obsess over that .1%

but none where it is helpful.

Except when you shoot it and experience less muzzle flip. For most people, less muzzle flip makes it easier to keep on target during rapid fire. This results in more, better hits on target.

clang
March 5, 2013, 09:37 AM
Except when you shoot it and experience less muzzle flip. For most people, less muzzle flip makes it easier to keep on target during rapid fire. This results in more, better hits on target.

When I fired a G19C and G19 side by side there was no appreciable difference.

David E
March 5, 2013, 10:31 AM
When I fired a G19C and G19 side by side there was no appreciable difference.

There is in rapid fire, provided your technique is sound. Again, I'm not talking about felt recoil, just muzzle flip.

(rapid fire being one shot every 15-18 /100ths of a second)

clang
March 5, 2013, 06:13 PM
There is in rapid fire, provided your technique is sound. Again, I'm not talking about felt recoil, just muzzle flip.

If your technique is sound, the difference in muzzle flip is negligable between a G19 and a G19C.

David E
March 5, 2013, 06:45 PM
If your technique is sound, the difference in muzzle flip is negligable between a G19 and a G19C.

As I said in my first post on the matter, less muzzle flip, FOR MOST PEOPLE, results in better hits on target. The 19-C produces less flip. Is it a lot less? Maybe not, but it's enough less to matter for most people, especially for the female shooter who will be shooting this gun, per the OP.

Again, talking rapid fire.

76shuvlinoff
March 5, 2013, 07:04 PM
Ported pistols I've owned I didn't own long. It wasn't the flash, it was the sound when shooting without muffs. Sooner or later you WILL shoot without hearing protection even if it's just to know it. I had a ported 3.5 inch .45 that was totally miserable to shoot and miserable for anyone around it.

Make a deal on the gun but be prepared to buy a barrel for it.

David E
March 5, 2013, 08:24 PM
I'd be curious to measure the decibels of a .357 snub nose compared to a 19-C

Zerodefect
March 6, 2013, 12:07 AM
If I shoot a ported Glock from the retention position....Will I burn my nipple or blow it off? I practice from that position often, ported pistols aren't for me.

I never noticed the difference in semiautos. They ain't Magnums, a good grip and a ton of training go a long way here.

Lucky for the Glock. You can swap in a standard barrel anytime you want.

CZguy
March 6, 2013, 01:40 AM
I've found ported pistols to be a definite advantage in reacquiring the front sight faster.

I mean it's pretty simple you have physics on your side. This thread has a great deal of quoting what's popular on the Internet as opposed to what simply works.

To all the naysayers, the next time you have an opportunity to shoot a compensated pistol, try it with an open mind.

clang
March 6, 2013, 01:46 PM
If it's such a great idea, why aren't all G19s compensated???

Sam1911
March 6, 2013, 01:49 PM
'Cause some of us don't like it. Why make an M&P, xD, and a Glock? Different strokes for different folks.

TAKtical
March 6, 2013, 01:55 PM
To be honest, ive owned both glock 17 and 19 "c" models and in my experience, there was no benefit at all. I dont think 9mm is hot enough, recoil is so minimal that I noticed absolutely zero difference. Now if you had a 10mm or .357sig, there would be quite a noticeable difference but IMO its pointless for 9mm pistols. The best solution I found for faster follow up shots is a ss guide rod with a slightly heavier spring. Your mileage may vary. BTW, all my glocks are Gen3. Cant vouch for any Gen4 aftermarket parts.

David E
March 6, 2013, 04:25 PM
If it's such a great idea, why aren't all G19s compensated???

All the Glock 19-C models are compensated.....

Takem406
March 6, 2013, 04:38 PM
My apologies for my negative comments earlier.

In God and Glock we Trust

clang
March 6, 2013, 07:46 PM
All the Glock 19-C models are compensated.....

And they still haven't discontinued the G19

David E
March 7, 2013, 12:30 AM
And they still haven't discontinued the G19

No, but a G19 is not a G19-C

clang
March 7, 2013, 09:13 AM
No, but a G19 is not a G19-C


My point exactly.

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