What do you carry when you actually hike?


PDA






Macchina
March 2, 2013, 04:47 PM
Just wondering what people bring with when they go on backpacking trips? I understand that many people carry their big guns when they hunt or walk in the woods, but do you still bring them when you're covering many miles and trying to stay light? When I backpack, I find a pack heavier than 30 pounds (a week in the woods) takes away from my enjoyment, and my pack is usually closer to 20 pounds. When I first got into backpacking, I'd bring the kitchen sink and die on the trail, I've since cut back and really enjoy the outdoors more. A loaded 4 pound 44 Magnum can add 20% to your load! I personally carry either a Sig P239 or my 4.2" SP101 I specifically bought for this propose. I've found the SP101 to be at the top end for what I want to carry, but it gives me all I could ever want in a woods gun.

So, what do you bring when you are on the trail for days on end? Have you ever brought much more gun than you should have and regretted it?

If you enjoyed reading about "What do you carry when you actually hike?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
bill3424
March 2, 2013, 04:55 PM
I normally roll with a Glock 20. Or sometimes just carry my trusty G19.

06
March 2, 2013, 04:57 PM
Always regretted every fraction of an ounce/gram after a few days--lol. Normally carry a 357 stainless with 12 extra rds. That is heavy enough to stop most any problem on the East coast.
ETA: on one/two hikes I may even drop a 380 Sig stainless into a pouch or pocket.

biohazurd
March 2, 2013, 04:58 PM
If i want to go really light i pack a lc9 or cw9. But normally i just take my M&p 9mm or Ruger super blackhawk. Most often the 9mm. I may not be perfect for a bear situation but 18 rounds into the head/neck region would be somewhat effective. Im more worried about 2 legged predators then 4..

PabloJ
March 2, 2013, 04:59 PM
G20 with Hornady 180gr or 200gr slugs. Depending where I go and for how long it maybe equipped with X300 light and up to six 15 round magazines.

Upstater
March 2, 2013, 05:01 PM
I always go with a full size steel framed 1911 with two extra mags, I have decidedly chosen reliability over weight.:)

RJTravel
March 2, 2013, 05:02 PM
I've been backpacking for many years - first solo trip in 1955. Only a couple of trips last year but plan more in 2013. Two years ago hiked in the Tongass and 8 trips in Colorado. My pack has gotten lighter over the years and now approx 15 lbs for 3-4 days vs 70-75 lbs when young. If taking grouse I carry a modified AR-7 approx 29 ounces, otherwise a .38 snubby or an 8 ounce 3AT .380acp. Wrks fer mee.

Macchina
March 2, 2013, 05:23 PM
G20 with Hornady 180gr or 200gr slugs. Depending where I go and for how long it maybe equipped with X300 light and up to six 15 round magazines.
Serious? How far do you hike with 6 mags? Have you ever needed to use your gun while hiking and if so did you find yourself lacking with what you had at the time? I'm not mocking you, just wondering what you're preparing for and if you've ever hiked far enough to appriciate shedding a few pounds of pack weight...

Macchina
March 2, 2013, 05:33 PM
I think there are two sides to picking what you carry: on one hand you know you're going to be carrying non-stop for days on end so it's tempting to bring your favorite or newest gun. On the other hand, YOU'RE GOING TO BE CARRYING NON STOP FOR DAYS ON END. To be honest, the woods are a very safe place and a pocket .38 will cover most any dire situation you may find yourself in in the woods. All the bears I've ever seen have been running away...

I've had to use a firearm twice outside from hunting purposes in my life: once to take a pitbull that stopped chassing a deer to come after me (took one shot from a .22 Mag) and another time when it took 3 shots to help my very lost brother find his way back to the truck before dark (there are benifits to all the blast H110 creates).

Vern Humphrey
March 2, 2013, 06:25 PM
I'm fortunate to live in Arkansas -- we have a great hiking trail here, the Ozark Highlands Trail, and hunting is allowed along that trail. I usually carry my Colt Woodsman (first model, made in 1938.)

CB900F
March 2, 2013, 06:26 PM
Fella's;

In my opinion, you need to take into account the threat level of the area that you're going to be hiking in. What's the most dangerous situation you might encounter, and what are the odds you're going to meet it? I live in an area of the country where large & aggressive bears are entirely possible to also be in vicinity. Mountain lions are not unknown either. Then there's wolfpacks, coyotes, and snakes.

How many in your hiking party will have a definate bearing on the odds of meeting anything that wants to take a chunk outta you. To paraphrase; the more the merrier. However, females in the party in cycle tend to attract bears. That's something to keep in mind.

If you aren't in griz habitat, the caliber size and weight can certainly go down. Just about anything else can be readily handled by a .357, or something smaller, your situation, your choice.

900F

Vern Humphrey
March 2, 2013, 06:37 PM
We have bears -- in fact, some years back a black bear on the Ozark Highlands Trail dragged off a tent, with a hiker inside. He abandoned tent and hiker after a hundred yards or so, though.

calaverasslim
March 2, 2013, 06:39 PM
3", 5 shot 44 special, w/10 extra rounds. 5 of which are snake shot

LT.Diver
March 2, 2013, 06:43 PM
If I'm jogging/running I carry my 351 PD .22 WMR. It weighs about 10 1/2 ounces. If I'm just hiking I like to carry my Single Six.

Mainsail
March 2, 2013, 07:17 PM
There's a similar thread here (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=625423). G20SF in a Bianchi M12 military holster. One magazine with ten rounds of 200gr hardcasts.

Alaska444
March 2, 2013, 07:18 PM
My long hikes are over, but running around in the woods, I have my SP101 as my EDC. In the deep woods, I throw my .44 magnum Ruger Super Redhawk over my shoulder in cross carry bandolier.

Seventhsword
March 2, 2013, 07:22 PM
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8252/8521987079_5bfeb20b00_b.jpg

Deaf Smith
March 2, 2013, 07:48 PM
Depends on the hike.

If with my wife and we are at a state park I pack my carry gun as the major critter to worry about will be a two legged one.

If in the WMA or National Forest I take my S&W 629-3 Mountain gun in .44 magnum. Usually loaded with 240gr SWCHP at 1000 fps (no were near max but one heck of a hog load.)

See here in Texas there are very very few polar or brown bears. Only ones I see are in zoos so I don't need a super bear gun and the downloaded .44 is fine for everything else.

Deaf

HKGuns
March 2, 2013, 08:02 PM
Either this one in a belt holster...

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s8/v78/p1423643648-5.jpg

Or this one in a Dirty Harry style under the arm pit Bianchi X15 holster.

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s3/v42/p1459048350-5.jpg

Bianchi X15 Holster
http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s4/v66/p1459070606-5.jpg

jeepnik
March 2, 2013, 08:08 PM
Nothing carries like a single action.

http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f271/Jeepnik/GUNS/HANDGUNS12-31-07-0027-1.jpg

jmr40
March 2, 2013, 08:36 PM
I carry my G-20 if in bear country, otherwise a G-19 works just fine. I have 44 and 357 mag options, but the G-20 is 3/4 lb lighter, an inch shorter and holds nearly 3X the ammo as my 3" 629.

Real world power is closer than you think. Magnum revolver numbers look good on paper when fired from 8" test barrels, but when fired from 3-4" barrels folks actually carry are not nearly as impressive. The Glock chronographs 200 gr bullets at 1315 fps. The 3" revolver will just barely make 1150 fps with 240 gr bullets. I could do much better with a 6" or more barrel, but the 3" gun is already too heavy and a 200 gr bullet at 1300+ will kill anything I'll shoot.

http://i1129.photobucket.com/albums/m513/jmr40/001-11.jpg

Seventhsword
March 2, 2013, 08:44 PM
These are what I keep in my .44's in "bear country"..

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8112/8522158995_23138f6579_b.jpg

MedWheeler
March 2, 2013, 08:46 PM
I agree, Jeepnik (and LT. Diver), and that is a pretty piece of trail hardware there.

I don't "backpack", per se, as all my hikes are done within one day, usually in one of the state parks or preserves. Here in Florida, it's mostly savannas and swampland, not rugged mountains and rocks.

Most of the time, I end up with just my carry piece, a Kel-Tec PF9, but that's more for those places I might stop while traveling to and from the preserve. But, I do like revolvers just for the "feel" while out within nature, and have sometimes switched out for my Ruger Service Six. If I had a suitable holster, I wouldn't mind packing my Heritage Rough Rider once in a while because, as you said, hiking screams for a single-action, and it's the one that I have.

Stevie-Ray
March 2, 2013, 09:14 PM
I don't backpack either, but for daily walks in the National Forest, I prefer a Glock 29. If I was young enough to still backpack I wouldn't change that.

capcyclone
March 2, 2013, 10:23 PM
Both backpacking and general hiking I carry my G26. Lightweight and powerful enough. No grizzlies to worry about in my area.

PabloJ
March 2, 2013, 10:32 PM
Serious? How far do you hike with 6 mags? Have you ever needed to use your gun while hiking and if so did you find yourself lacking with what you had at the time? I'm not mocking you, just wondering what you're preparing for and if you've ever hiked far enough to appriciate shedding a few pounds of pack weight...
Typical hike entails having G20 with fifteen round magazine inserted. Spare magazine isn't
needed at all.

bobinoregon
March 2, 2013, 10:50 PM
My wife and I hiked 40 miles with me carrying my 4" model 19. Never really saw animals as much of an issue compared to other creatures. I promised myself that if we do anything that far again it will be with a much lighter handgun. I'm planning on scandium for next time.

sub-moa
March 3, 2013, 01:08 AM
Day hikes only now (both hips replaced...w/ one replacement about to be re-replaced :mad:/both knees replaced...all 4 w/in past 2 years/old screws in ankles :what:, in/around Glacier/Yellowstone/Teton several weeks each late spring/summer w/ a G29+spare mag/DT 200WFNGC in nylon gun bag :D

Boxhead
March 3, 2013, 04:42 AM
The hiking I do is when I am at my place in north Idaho. There I carry an old Ruger Flattop 44 Mag cut to 4 5/8" and loaded with 280 gr WFN's at 1100 fps under 4227. It's carried in one of Rob Leahy's sourdough's. Easy to carry, accurate and plenty of thump too. While we do have grizzly in the area and blacks in the yard moose are what folks seem to have trouble with when there is the remote case of "trouble".

Cryogaijin
March 3, 2013, 06:13 AM
Witness 10mm with fullhouse loads.

Pete D.
March 3, 2013, 07:14 AM
Hiking......S&W 317 AirLite .22 with an extra eight rounds. Eleven ounces loaded.
Pete

Random Discharge
March 3, 2013, 08:51 AM
Wish I had the sights on the new 4" model, but not enough to replace what I have...

ACP
March 3, 2013, 10:35 AM
East Coast hiking/woods walking it's usually a .357 Magnum S&W 686 4" stainless with 180-gr. hardcast loads in a kydex belt holster.

Kayaker 1960
March 3, 2013, 11:05 AM
Here in N. California we have Mountain Lions and Black Bears as well as pot farms. Most backpacking is done at higher elevations so the farms aren't a problem. It seems that most serious backpackers don't carry a gun. I've done weekend hikes, I carry my SP101 and even that is heavy, considering a .38 LCR or subcompact 9mm. The biggest threat I've faced so far was an agressive Yellow Bellied Marmot. I fended him off with my fishing pole.
I like to bring a gun for overnight whitewater kayaking trips also and a lighter gun would be nice.

Torian
March 3, 2013, 11:08 AM
I carry my Witness Elite Match in 10mm with Underwood 200 grain FMJs or XTPs, depending on what I have.

psyopspec
March 3, 2013, 11:29 AM
Mine has always varied over the years, but like CB900F said above, I've generally gone with an odds play, or just took whatever weighed the least. In Colorado I took a light weight .357. In AZ, AR, and the Dakotas, whatever full size 9mm I had for CCW at at the time. Weight was never a huge issue in any of those cases, but I do remember thinking that the S&W 340SC carried very nicely on the trail. I'll be going back to AZ again this month to visit some relations and hopefully hit up a trail or two. It'll probably be the Glock 19 that tags along.

Eventually I'll get a G20 and turn it into a dedicated HD and woods gun.

MutinousDoug
March 3, 2013, 11:38 AM
I've backpacked and hunted in Colorado since 1976. I used to carry a Blackhawk in .41 but traded it in for a model 19 S&W. Then traded that for my current carry: a Ruger Bearcat. I've surprised (the sentiment was mutual) two bear and a cougar in that time but none of them stayed around long enough for me to get a gun out of it's holster. The Bearcat is for grouse or snowshoes and anything that goes bump in the night.

DesertFox
March 3, 2013, 02:00 PM
Mostly G29 w/ G20 mag that has a sleeve. Depending on time of year and threat level (aka grizzly infestation) I do sometimes go with a 629PC 3".

I also like to have a 22LR as I find myself using it more while hiking than either of the other canons. Snub nosed 9 shot revolver is quite handy.

doc2rn
March 3, 2013, 04:41 PM
S&W mod 10 3" or S&W 651 .38 Spec or .22 WMR depends on where I am going and for how long but the 651 in .22 WMR usually wins.

wolfbane
March 3, 2013, 05:28 PM
I hike extensively , i am now carrying a glock 20 with UNDERWOOD 165gr about 786lbs at muzzle, i initially could not get the glock to put 5 in nice group at 15 yards, i have changed the recoil rod to a brass stacker with 22lb recoil springs, it made the pistol before i shot in feel a 100% more comfortable and solid, i cannot recommend the 22lb spring unless you are shooting ammo with a attitude, upon shooting the glock with the improved recoil, i was able to but five in a 1.5 in at 15yds and very close to that at twenty five, the control is much improved and its becoming the natural shooter, i desire to carry,just a thought my friends that venture in bear country,wolfbane

Dryft
March 3, 2013, 05:43 PM
I spend a lot of time doing overnight and long distance hiking/camping - often by myself, and the best for me so far has been a four inch stainless Ruger SP101 in .357. I keep a shotshell in the first chamber, and full power loads in the rest.

To get around the pack and hipbelt issues, I carry in a thigh holster.

Charles S
March 3, 2013, 06:03 PM
I'm fortunate to live in Arkansas -- we have a great hiking trail here, the Ozark Highlands Trail, and hunting is allowed along that trail. I usually carry my Colt Woodsman (first model, made in 1938.)

Mr. Humphrey, what a elegant carry piece.

I am fortunate like the esteemed Mr. Humphrey to live, while not in, very close to Arkansas and as such have access to an enormous number of wonderful hiking and backpacking trails. Additionally, my son is an in organization that encourages hiking and back packing.

In my humble opinion, in this region, with quite limited experience, I worry far more about two legged predators that I do the four legged variety. I have never done anything as ambitious as the Appalachian trail, but have done some week long trips.

If we are talking a hike, wight is not an issue and I don't mind carrying a 1911, a full size 357, or even my a take down rifle and a snub nose. For longer back packing trips, as has been previously mentioned, weight can become a real issue. I am not a fan of taking a semi auto pistol with a single magazine as certain types of malfunctions require a magazine change. I find myself more and more carrying a compact Ruger with a single speed loader to back me up. I have carried my S&W Chief Special 45 with a spare magazine on occasion, although I really like the idea of a Scandium S&W 44.

Great pics earlier guys and a great thread.

Quiet
March 3, 2013, 06:03 PM
When hiking, I most often carry my .45ACP S&W Model 325PD (2.5") loaded with 230gr JHPs.
Where I hike (CA, NV, AZ), I'm only concerned/worried about two legged predators and mountain lions.

Ehtereon11B
March 3, 2013, 07:14 PM
On long hikes (2+ days) where bear might be an issue, I carry a 12ga with a pistol grip loaded with slugs in a part of my bag that would not be easily seen by a casual observer on the trail. Otherwise I carry one of my .45ACP pistols for other worrisome critters.

Kayaker 1960
March 3, 2013, 08:01 PM
I think it's apparent that most people here have never been on backpacking trip of more than a few miles, otherwise you wouldn't be suggesting such heavy hardware. I took my 4" model 19 on a couple 10 mile hikes. It can be done but it is far less than ideal. Most experienced backpackers carry a very light load and would consider the weight of even the lightest firearm as exessive and unneccessary. I do like the comfort of a warm gun at night but for the O.P's stated purpose it has got to be as light as possible. a Sub-compact pistol or small, light weight revolver is in order unless you are in big bear country.

k_dawg
March 3, 2013, 08:08 PM
Black bears here are very rare and small. Worst threats are coyotes and humans. So I carry what I shoot the most accurately: fullsize 1911 in .45acp with nightsights

montanaoffroader
March 3, 2013, 08:39 PM
When I lived in NorCal, I usually carried a Colt SAA in .357 Mag. Packed it all over Humboldt and Trinity counties, never actually had to use it for serious work. Came close a few times, but I was lucky.

Nowadays I generally pack a Ruger Super Blackhawk in .44 Mag. After I moved back to Montana I retired the SAA to range duty and picked up a King Cobra and the SBH, always have one or the other on me when I'm out and about in the hills.

Charles S
March 3, 2013, 08:47 PM
never actually had to use it for serious work. Came close a few times, but I was lucky.

If you follow this thread.. and others there is a very common theme. Probably true of those of us who carry all the time, not just in backpacking, camping, hiking, but in life.

A lot of us have carried for a lot of years, but have not ever used their weapon. Truth be told I still prefer to be in the have it and not need it crowd. :)

HB
March 3, 2013, 09:00 PM
I've taken a glock 17, Buckmark, and a Blackhawk in .357. It just depends on what's in season and if its raining or not. Never carry more than a mag for the glock or a couple extra .38s or .22s for squirrels. There are some feral hogs in the ozarks and I've always wanted a nice roast if I happened upon one.

HB

Dryft
March 3, 2013, 09:35 PM
I think it's apparent that most people here have never been on backpacking trip of more than a few miles, otherwise you wouldn't be suggesting such heavy hardware. I took my 4" model 19 on a couple 10 mile hikes. It can be done but it is far less than ideal. Most experienced backpackers carry a very light load and would consider the weight of even the lightest firearm as exessive and unneccessary. I do like the comfort of a warm gun at night but for the O.P's stated purpose it has got to be as light as possible. a Sub-compact pistol or small, light weight revolver is in order unless you are in big bear country.
As always, everything is personal preference - what one person prefers will not necessarily be what another enjoys.

Whether it's a five mile hike or Maine's Hundred Mile Wilderness, carry what is best for you - no more and no less.

And if someone thinks you're carrying too much? Well, that's their opinion.

mljdeckard
March 3, 2013, 09:37 PM
Same thing I always carry, a 1911. Sometimes my Para wide-frame.

Triplec
March 3, 2013, 11:12 PM
So I backpack in grizzly country, would anybody carry anything less than a caliber that you could use to deal with a grizzly (if such a thing exists)? I carry bear spray, plus my Glock 9mm for fun (I'm still young so I can carry extra weight for fun).

psyopspec
March 4, 2013, 01:59 AM
So I backpack in grizzly country, would anybody carry anything less than a caliber that you could use to deal with a grizzly (if such a thing exists)? I carry bear spray, plus my Glock 9mm for fun (I'm still young so I can carry extra weight for fun).

If you use the search function you'll find opinions and threads ad nauseum on this topic. Generally, from reading the opinions of posters that live in places with regular contact with grizzlies or who have BTDT, the "caliber to deal with a grizzly" doesn't exist in a handgun. If you're packing spray you've brought a better tool for the job.

I have moved up calibers when hiking bear country, but I don't delude myself that going from 9mm to a .45ACP or a .357 would allow me to take on a bear. Rather, on the off chance I run into one, and on the off chance it attacks me, and on the off chance I get a shot off, and on the off chance I get lucky with where I land it, I'd prefer to have more penetration rather than less.

Dr.Rob
March 4, 2013, 02:17 AM
357 snubby. Lighter is better.

jon86
March 4, 2013, 11:35 AM
I usually carry just a 5 shot 38 special. I am considering something a bit more soon. Maybe an sp101 or an XDS 45.

Arizona_Mike
March 4, 2013, 12:15 PM
Ruger Super Redhawk Alaskan in .454 Casull. First 2 cylinders are loaded with .45 Colt snake shot and the last 4 with Buffalo Bore hardened lead pentrators. Totally geared to defense against 4-legged (or 0-legged) animals--should be adequate for 2-legged ones (and probably a little messy as well), but that is not part of my planning or thought process.

I did extensive patterning practice with .357, .44 man (.429") and .45 snake shot shells and I was not pleased with the smaller calibers. The 12% bigger bore of the .45 over even the .44 gives much better patterns (I think less shot is scattered by the riflings). The performance with snake shot is why I chose the caliber.

I have encountered bear hiking near Wickenburg and I have seen bear near my cabin on Mt. Graham several times. There are also a lot of huge free-range bulls and cows. They a bit less docile than farm cows and bulls and every once and a while a story makes the press about someone killed by their own dairy cow. This is why I went to the high-power Buffalo-Bore ammo and the hardened lead penetrators (penetration is more important than expansion on a bull or a bear shot defensively lengthways).

Mike

willypete
March 4, 2013, 12:16 PM
2.25" SP101 .357 Mag. Anything else is just too heavy! Tried a .44 Mag Redhawk for a while, but it's a lot of unnecessary weight. If I had a 4" SP101, I might carry that, but I'll weight 'til they're available used.

wlewisiii
March 4, 2013, 01:02 PM
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-XGkFAoReGlo/UQHCLuImcHI/AAAAAAAAEv8/TASHeMCVIL8/s640/P1241214.JPG

Model 625 Mountain Gun in .45 Colt. Light enough to carry but more than enough power if needed.

herkyguy
March 4, 2013, 05:01 PM
357 snubby. Lighter is better.
Yes Sir! lightweight is critical. the more you're on the move, you more you realize just how much your wheelgun weighs. With all that said, I carry a GP100 with a 6" barrel, loaded with the first four rounds of 158 grain .357. last two rounds are snakeshot. When i encounter a snake, i've always had enough time to spin the cylinder.

I'll add that I now carry it in a Galco shoulder rig and it is far superior to when i used to carry it on my hip. The galco rig also has leather compartments to carry 12 additional rounds.

gulogulo1970
March 4, 2013, 07:24 PM
I used to carry a Glock 27, now I carry 3" Ruger SP-101. No grizzlies where I go camping. So, a 357 magnum should be enough for anything I'd run into. Two legged predators would be more likely, than say getting attacked by a cougar or black bear anyway.

kgpcr
March 4, 2013, 07:43 PM
In Minnesota i carry my .40 M&P or my .357 7shot snub. In Alaska its my Ruger Alaskan .454

Ehtereon11B
March 4, 2013, 09:59 PM
I think it's apparent that most people here have never been on backpacking trip of more than a few miles, otherwise you wouldn't be suggesting such heavy hardware.

All about preference. I shocked the crap out of some hikers when I hiked up Mt Washington in NH when I told them that I was carrying a LIGHT load that weighed 92 pounds. That was with the 12ga. To make it even better I told them that I started hiking in Southwestern Maine along the White Mountain range.

highpower
March 4, 2013, 10:25 PM
I carry my old four screw M29. First two shots are snake shot and the rest are rather stout 240 gr lead SWC handloads. I carry it in this Bianchi 5BH high ride holster.

http://highpower.smugmug.com/Firearms/S/i-tLJmBvF/0/XL/IMG_1890-XL.jpg
http://highpower.smugmug.com/Firearms/S/i-jNpTR2H/0/XL/IMG_1889-XL.jpg

Torian
March 4, 2013, 10:30 PM
An extra pound or two is nothing when it comes to having the peace of mind knowing I'm packing maximum firepower in the event of a confrontation (large predator).

I'm used to carrying around 40 pounds of extra weight anyways, so the gun is not really an issue. If a pound or two is breaking the bank for some of our hikers, they might want to spend a few weeks on a treadmill at the gym before heading out on the trail :)

Nothing wrong with getting a good workout! You aren't going to fall over from exhaustion carrying a Super redhawk instead of a GP 100.

jim243
March 4, 2013, 11:01 PM
I do like the comfort of a warm gun at night but for the O.P's stated purpose it has got to be as light as possible. a Sub-compact pistol or small, light weight revolver is in order unless you are in big bear country.

While less weight when backbacking is good, it is not so good for personal defense while camping or backpacking. A lightweight pistol or revolver does not have sufficient power to provide the protection you will want if faced with a life threating situation.

It is better to shed a few pounds of equipment to carry a sufficient caliber handgun for your personal protection. Most hikers and campers I know of carry at least a 357 Mag if not a 44 Mag GP-100. The short 2 1/2 inch guns are useless for anything than you are already in trouble and near death use. Bears, cats (mt lions), wolves all run a lot faster than you or me and will attack without warning. Anything less than a 4 inch barrel and perferably a 6 or 6 1/2 inch barrel will not give you rhe sighting to take down an attacker.

What you carry is your choice, just make it one that will actually work in an emergency.

Jim

Thursday45
March 4, 2013, 11:29 PM
Last couple years I've carried a Glock 20 loaded with Double Tap 200gr hard cast rounds. I just picked up a Taurus Ultralite 44 mag and if it shoots reliably I will start carrying that since I'm in grizz country. I'm still skeptical of it being so light weight and it holding up but so far so good.

Mainsail
March 5, 2013, 10:36 AM
It is better to shed a few pounds of equipment to carry a sufficient caliber handgun for your personal protection. Most hikers and campers I know…

The term 'camping' is a giveaway; we're not talking about the same thing. Camping is pretending to be homeless for a night or two, usually within sight of the car or truck that brought you there. Backpacking is where you travel many miles over rough terrain to spend the night in some scenic spot carrying everything you'll need on your back.

Most (~90% or more) of the hikers and backpackers I know don't carry any means of self protection larger than a folding pocket knife. Of the few that do carry protection, most carry bear spray (~9%), and only a very few carry a handgun of any type.

It's not a war zone. Incidents where a firearm of any type would be useful are extremely rare. The time you spend at the trailhead is probably the most dangerous. We have thousands of hikers and backpackers here crawling over the terrain every month of the year, and I can remember only one incident where a firearm might have been helpful; a mountain goat attack.

Statistically speaking a firearm is unnecessary. Some of us carry one for several possible threats, all of which we know are very unlikely. For the places we frequent, your suggestion of "shedding a few ponds of equipment" is unrealistic. We carry only necessary survival gear, necessary food, and a few luxuries (camera, sleeping pad, fishing gear, etc.). Since hypothermia and falls kill and injure far more people than the wildlife, we prioritize our gear for those threats.

I'd much rather hike farther over rougher terrain to get away from the yahoos, and to do that my gear has to be lightweight.

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/fc604a57-7c22-4d19-a060-e648e00dde15.jpg

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/b8e1156f-6eb1-4c2c-b8f6-c5e55226b23e.jpg

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/829d54cc-2aad-4ab4-a64e-aa04d9f4b68d.jpg

Certaindeaf
March 5, 2013, 10:50 AM
I'd a rammed that goat with my wheelbarrow.

303tom
March 5, 2013, 11:27 AM
My Blackhawk in .327 Fed. Mag................

460Kodiak
March 5, 2013, 11:35 AM
Depends........

I hike a lot, but it is always day hiking (usually 10-16 miles in a day, then I go home). I don't really back pack, yet. So consider when you look at my answer.

If I'll be hiking in grizzly or moose country, I carry my S&W 460V. It has a 5" bbl, balances great for me, and will stop anything, with proper ammo and shot placement. It is a 4 lb gun though, so for back packing you may hate it. I carry it cross draw on the hip and wear suspenders under my outer shirt to help keep the pants up.

I do not live in a place with bear of any kind though, so my need to carry that gun is reserved to when I travel to bear country.

What I do have a lot of in my back yard are mountain lions. And I mean a lot. The quota for this years hunting season here is 100 cats I believe. So, my typical carry gun is my 3" Ruger SP101 in .357 magnum in a Simply Rugged belt holster. I also frequently carry my Springfield XDs with 8 rounds in the gun. I carry that in a Hidden Hybrid Holster, or in a kydex belt holster. Both guns are plenty to stop a cat or a crazy person.

If I am going to a place that I know has a high lion population, I carry my 1911 or FNP-45, depending on my mood.

You have to think about what the possible threat is. If I was in grizz country, and backpacking a lot of miles for several days, and weight was a real concern, I'd maybe be looking at a S&W air weight 44 mag, or maybe one of those PC 629's with the short bbl. If weight was a real issue for me for days, I'd probably consider a GLOCK in 10mm, even though I hate GLOCKS.

Dnaltrop
March 5, 2013, 12:16 PM
Statistically, yes... a firearm isn't needed. But our trailhead parking lots here are littered with smashed windows, and attacks of varying severity aren't that uncommon.

http://www.oregonlive.com/news/index.ssf/2010/02/son_testifies_against_father_i.html

"A Vancouver father was convicted this evening, in part on his son's testimony, of robbing and severely beating a skier last February near Washougal.

A Skamania County jury took less than two hours to find Michael David Collins, 34, guilty of attempted murder and first-degree robbery.

His son, Teven Collins, 17, testified that, at his father's direction, he struck skier Robert Tracey once with a large stick and used a rope to drag him into some bushes. He also took Tracey's vehicle keys and backpack.

Teven Collins also testified his father struck Tracey several times with the club.

"He said he could never give an explanation of why he did it, other than he was doing this with his father, who has been essentially grooming him for a period of time, telling him how he had to earn his bones or body count,"

Even people not hiking, just stopped for a rest in the general vicinity.

http://www.katu.com/news/local/Truck-driver-stabbed-at-Gorge-viewpoint-near-Corbett-185658472.html

"Troopers said Edwin Jones, 39, told them he was stopped at a viewpoint on Interstate 84 near Corbett due to traffic when he was approached by two men at about 12:30 a.m. Jones is from Nebraska.

Police said Jones told them the men asked him for money and cigarettes.

When he refused, one of the men, described as a white male, pulled a knife and injured Jones on his hand, lower arm and stomach, police said in a press release."

I'm used to the weight, but I'd consider anything you were willing to carry at that point to be appropriate.

bannockburn
March 5, 2013, 12:23 PM
When I used to go hiking I carried my Beretta Model 70S in .22LR. It's relatively lightweight, has been 100% reliable with any ammo I have put through it, and very accurate with its crisp trigger and adjustable sights.

Elm Creek Smith
March 5, 2013, 01:05 PM
In the olden days when I went backpacking I carried an M16A2 with seven 30-round magazines and an M1911A1 with three 7-round magazines.

These days I carry my S&W Model 37 with Buffalo Bore standard pressure ammo with two speed strips.180851


ECS
Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 2

k_dawg
March 5, 2013, 08:03 PM
Statistically speaking, a woman need not fear rape.

That is why they have whistles and callboxes.

I carry when ever I am. Civilized society or deep in the woods.

Indifferent
March 5, 2013, 08:15 PM
642 in pocket with Hornady Critical Defense loads. (Biggest threat is 2 legged predators)

Teachu2
March 5, 2013, 08:21 PM
Statistically speaking, a woman need not fear rape.

That is why they have whistles and callboxes.

I carry when ever I am. Civilized society or deep in the woods.
Where, pray tell, have you found civilized society?

481
March 5, 2013, 09:37 PM
Just my Glock 17 loaded with 147 gr XTPs. The only real threat(s) I am likely to encounter are two-legged.

Deputy25
March 5, 2013, 09:39 PM
I generally carry my duty pistol, a Glock 31.

David E
March 5, 2013, 10:16 PM
You guys carrying semi-autos, do you carry spare mags? If so, how many?

Macchina
March 5, 2013, 10:45 PM
The term 'camping' is a giveaway; we're not talking about the same thing. Camping is pretending to be homeless for a night or two, usually within sight of the car or truck that brought you there. Backpacking is where you travel many miles over rough terrain to spend the night in some scenic spot carrying everything you'll need on your back.

Most (~90% or more) of the hikers and backpackers I know don't carry any means of self protection larger than a folding pocket knife. Of the few that do carry protection, most carry bear spray (~9%), and only a very few carry a handgun of any type.

It's not a war zone. Incidents where a firearm of any type would be useful are extremely rare. The time you spend at the trailhead is probably the most dangerous. We have thousands of hikers and backpackers here crawling over the terrain every month of the year, and I can remember only one incident where a firearm might have been helpful; a mountain goat attack.

Statistically speaking a firearm is unnecessary. Some of us carry one for several possible threats, all of which we know are very unlikely. For the places we frequent, your suggestion of "shedding a few ponds of equipment" is unrealistic. We carry only necessary survival gear, necessary food, and a few luxuries (camera, sleeping pad, fishing gear, etc.). Since hypothermia and falls kill and injure far more people than the wildlife, we prioritize our gear for those threats.

I'd much rather hike farther over rougher terrain to get away from the yahoos, and to do that my gear has to be lightweight.

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/fc604a57-7c22-4d19-a060-e648e00dde15.jpg

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/b8e1156f-6eb1-4c2c-b8f6-c5e55226b23e.jpg

http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/829d54cc-2aad-4ab4-a64e-aa04d9f4b68d.jpg
This post is word-for-word why I made this thread, I agree that many people are confusing camping with backpacking (hence the "really" emphasis in the title). Awesome pics!

Epee
March 5, 2013, 10:47 PM
CZ 97B with 1 extra mag.

I have lighter choices, but I shoot well with this handgun.

Zerodefect
March 5, 2013, 11:31 PM
Glock23
Custom Dan Wesson Valor 5" 1911
Kahr P380 (deep c, and keeping weight down)

Obviously the Glock and 1911 are my prefered pistols for nasty weather and sweaty dirty backpacking. Edge going to the Glock.

I've done multiple sections of the AT and most of the Florida trail. Lots of car camping, stealth camping, and canoeing as well. Allways feel better with a pistol on me. As unneeded as they may be. Especially when we start to have more and more "better" looking, attention grabbing, women in our groups.

Usually the only backwoods hobby I go unarmed is Mountain biking. All the bouncing around is a pain for retention and buried in my Camel Back is a useless place for a pistol. Weight is more important on wheels than it is backpacking as well.

My 3 day pack weighs about 15-20 pounds total. I never carry more than 1000ml of water or 16oz of denatured alcohol.
Key tech items in my pack to keep weight down:
-Gossamer Gear/Henry Shires 2 person Sailcloth tarp tent. 1lb.
-GG back pack. 1lb.
-Dryducks rain gear
-Mountain Hardwear Phantom bag or 20 degree Marmot.
-Ultralite Thermarest
-MSR Waterworks
-Pepsi can stove

For shorter trips and basecamping I'll use a big heavy Gregory Palisade and pack it plush with all the heavy luxerious bits. Both of my sleeping bags etc. etc.

Bears are the least of my problems. Crazy people, and desperate people are far worse. I hike all the time in Black Bear country. Even had them stick their head in my tent (friendly bear at designated campgound). Never any problems once I got used to it. Only have done a few small trips in Griz country. So I have no advice for those, other than that bear spray can be more effective than a pistol if your luck is poor.

481
March 5, 2013, 11:44 PM
You guys carrying semi-autos, do you carry spare mags? If so, how many?

Yes, typically one spare loaded with 124 gr ball.

Macchina
March 6, 2013, 07:59 AM
A few summers ago (June is the best time to hike a desert, right?) a few buddies of mine and myself decided to do the hike to Havasu Falls. It is on a Native Reservation, so no guns are allowed. They don't even allow machettes or hatches...

The hike in is 12 miles through a dry desert canyon. The high that day was 105. I packed a gallon of water (about 10 pounds) and had used it all up 2 miles before camp and had to borrow from others. It was so dry that even though I cycled a gallon of water, my shirt never got wet from sweat.

Once we got to camp, we had quite the feeling of accomplishments. We spent 5 days hiking the canyon down to the Colorado River and back. We saw sights I've never seen before, Havasu Falls is a place like no other in the world. Not once did I wish I had a firearm on that trip and was quite glad I did not have the extra weight! We could have gotten into a lot of trouble if we all substituted 3 pounds of water for handguns...

The hike starts (and ends on the way out) with a 60 degree 1/3 mile drop into the major canyon. Switchbacks the whole way.
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01690.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01686.jpg
Going back up at the end:
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01679.jpg
Enjoying the smallest of the falls:
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01629.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01567.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01557.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01612.jpg
The stream provides all the water for the plants at the base of the canyon
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01544.jpg
A trail down on our way to the lower falls:
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01509.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01505.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01513.jpg
Very worth it:
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01517-1.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01486-1.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01435.jpg
http://i88.photobucket.com/albums/k168/michaelmcgo/Havasu%20Falls/DSC01314.jpg


I try to plan a pretty epic hike about every other year. I have never brought my firearm on any of these "real" trips. We tend to see much less people when you're literally hundreds of miles from civilization and everyone that is around is as into the trip as you are. I carry always on weekend hikes in my state, I can handle the extra pound or two and I don't feel as comfortable on short trails. Bottom line: judge the need for the firearm and remember how dangerous it is to drive to the trailhead. If you don't think you'll need it, bring extra water instead.

460Kodiak
March 6, 2013, 09:26 AM
That is a cool pic michaelmcgo with a foot in frame while looking over a cliff, and I know it isn't a competition, but I had to post this. I got ya beet on that one!! LOL. Apples and oranges though, you know?

This was just shy of a 1500 climb/hike to the top of this spot in Bryce Canyon NP. That is a bus stop at the bottom on a paved two lane road. In the black and white shot, the top of the trail ended at the prominant point on the left. My God, that was a good day.

On this day I chose to carry the smallest and lightest gun I had: My little S&W 642 Airweight, loaded with Speer 135 gr Short BBL 38's. Stupid tourists were the only threat up there, and attack chipmunks that would hop up on your hand or shoe if they thought you had food. I only had the one day there, so I needed to move as fast as I could and see as much as I could, so a super light gun was a must. I probably didn't need one at all, but when ever there are people around, I assume the worst.

That's why I live and work alone.... in the woods...... away from people as far as my bank account and my job allows.

Macchina
March 6, 2013, 09:34 AM
That is a cool pic michaelmcgo with a foot in frame while looking over a cliff, and I know it isn't a competition, but I had to post this. I got ya beet on that one!! LOL. Apples and oranges though, you know?

I didn't know this was going to be a competition...
Here's a picture from the summit of my last hike:
http://thewordzombie.com/wp-content/uploads/earth-from-space-clouds.jpg

anothernewb
March 6, 2013, 09:55 AM
^lol. Unless you're hiking with Baumgartner.

I carry the 642. lightest thing I have.

Hunter991
March 6, 2013, 10:07 AM
Don't hike too much but when camping I carry my 9mm XD usually with 16 rounds. Now that I have an xds I will carry that with 2 mags and a box of ammo. We only have black bear and wolves in wisc but people would be more of a concern.

460Kodiak
March 6, 2013, 10:12 AM
;):)I didn't know this was going to be a competition...


LOL! Nice man!

It doesn't count though. You have to have your foot in frame!!!

Mainsail
March 6, 2013, 10:34 AM
It doesn't count though. You have to have your foot in frame!!!

:D

http://www.topohiker.com/Hikes/images/TownsendStorm/BootShot.png

http://www.topohiker.com/Hikes/images/BigQ/Pass05.png

Shadow 7D
March 6, 2013, 10:35 AM
Mossberg 500 (18.5"barrel and youth stock) think there may be trouble (bears, and not the black kind) along with spray
Tokarev or CZ52 and spray otherwise.

w9trb
March 6, 2013, 10:48 AM
I hike mostly in the Shawnee National Forest and only carry a Mora since this is Illinois.

Deer_Freak
March 6, 2013, 11:42 AM
I carry a Ruger Blackhawk chambered in 357 mag with a 6.5" barrel in a simple belt holster with a retention strap. Double Tap makes 180 gr cast ammo that is supposed to take down a bear. I shot a deer that was facing me in the chest with a 125 gr JSP Fiocchi. The bullet went through 34" of deer and exited right before the hip.

Cryogaijin
March 9, 2013, 07:24 AM
For my 10mm witness I tend to carry two spare mags. One with ball, one with a quality jhp. Have ball loaded by default.

AJumbo
March 9, 2013, 10:49 AM
4 5/8" Blackhawk in .357, or a Bisley Vaquero 5 1/2" in .45 Colt, loaded with six (I know, I know...) appropriately heavy SWC rounds. In summer, I might load two snakeshot rounds for the first two shots. Two reloads on Speeds Strips, maybe another on a belt slide. Trail threats here in central AZ can be rattlers, mountain lions, bears, or drug/human smugglers.

Bad Andy
March 10, 2013, 11:07 AM
I work as USFS Wilderness Ranger. I never carry while working. If I do carry while hiking like I do around home, I carry a Glock 20. Light weight for the power. Having said that I seldom carry while backpacking only day hikes, and at work I always carry bear spray. Bear spray will work on lions and wolves too. Statistics show in a real life bear charge, bear spray is about 95% effective, handguns are less than 5% effective. A bears heart beats about 1 beat every 5 seconds, even IF you could hit a charging bear in the heart, it will still most probably make contact with you, especially with a Grizzly. Bear spray will stop them in their tracks. Spray will cover an area of about 30 feet, handgun not so much. Spray is much lighter and easier to put into action if needed. I'm a very avid hunter, I work in the backcountry in Rocky Mountain states and have no problems doing so only carrying bear spray.

AJumbo
March 10, 2013, 12:26 PM
Bad Andy- that's good info, a lot of food for thought there. Thanks!

David E
March 10, 2013, 01:36 PM
If the concern was primarily a charging bear, spray might be a good idea.

But I worry more about people.

sansone
March 10, 2013, 02:01 PM
LCP, no extra mag.. I'm an optimist ;)

beag_nut
March 10, 2013, 03:33 PM
Carry while hiking?
Bear spray, everywhere. East of the Mississippi Ruger SP101 4" .357 mag., snakeshot, and solid jacketed 180 gr.
West of That river, GP100 6", .357, snake shot and same solids.

Bad Andy
March 10, 2013, 04:13 PM
Bear Spray works on people too.

HKGuns
March 10, 2013, 09:52 PM
I think it's apparent that most people here have never been on backpacking trip of more than a few miles, otherwise you wouldn't be suggesting such heavy hardware.

Don't make silly assumptions. I could carry that S&W .44 Mag in that shoulder holster further than you could carry a Beretta Nano in your pocket.

returningfire
March 10, 2013, 10:15 PM
Ruger, Security six. 4" stainless. Carry heavy load 357 for bear, coyote, two legged critters etc and some 38 spl. shotshell for the crawly critters.

Vern Humphrey
March 10, 2013, 10:39 PM
Don't make silly assumptions. I could carry that S&W .44 Mag in that shoulder holster further than you could carry a Beretta Nano in your pocket.
That reminds me of something Colin Fletcher (The Compleat Walker) said he once overheard, "He's a real backpacker. He's got a filed-down toothbrush."

I've done the Applachian Trail, mostly in 140 to 150 mile sections, along with the Ozark Highlands Trail, Horseshoe Trail and a few others. Adding a pound to my gear makes me cringe.

Epee
March 10, 2013, 10:44 PM
I hike a lot near the Mexican border. I never hike without a weapon in this part of the country.

Vern Humphrey
March 10, 2013, 10:47 PM
I second that -- in fact, I'd arrange for artillery support for a hike there!

The_Armed_Therapist
March 11, 2013, 09:23 AM
Marlin 1894 .44mag, with a Glock 22 on my belt and a Kel-Tec P32 in the pocket. The latter two go with me everywhere; the former when I'm in the woods or mountains.

Certaindeaf
March 11, 2013, 12:33 PM
I used to hump eighty pounds fifty miles a day. Guns are fun!

Macchina
March 11, 2013, 01:41 PM
Marlin 1894 .44mag, with a Glock 22 on my belt and a Kel-Tec P32 in the pocket. The latter two go with me everywhere; the former when I'm in the woods or mountains.
Really? Are we talking camping (if you have a cooler, you're camping) or backpacking (if you've considered cutting the tags off your sleeping bag, you're backpacking)? Do you bring the three guns including a rifle for fun or because you feel you need three guns for protection?

Cosmoline
March 11, 2013, 01:52 PM
It never fails that the time I decide to go light and bring a little magnum, there are bears running all over the place. So I try to bring the .450 levergun even if it isn't convenient.

Frank44
March 11, 2013, 02:45 PM
I feel perfectly safe with my S&W 686 4in. loaded with 158gr. JSP in 357mag. Where I currently live, I believe this will handle anything I might encounter.

Arizona_Mike
March 11, 2013, 06:54 PM
Bad Andy, I believe that you have quoted the heart rate for a hibernating bear. A bear's pulse is usually around 40-70 bpm and the pulse rate has nothing to do with how quickly blood pressure will drop to the point of unconsciousness. Besides, that would also be the completely wrong kind of shot to try on a charging bear--you want to break a shoulder (if you have a long gun) or do mass neurological damage (only option with handgun).

Don't mistake my reply for bravado: I'm sure firing bear spray into a headwind is much more manly than carrying a big gun.

Mike

19-3Ben
March 12, 2013, 06:23 PM
Was my Ruger Security Six.
Just got a Speed Six that will soon replace it as primary woods carry.

Greycliff gunman
March 13, 2013, 02:54 AM
I live in Alaska. We have very large and dangerous game here. I don't leave the side of the road without packing something. Even kids on their way to school are at risk of being trampled by a stubborn moose. If I am just walking with my family around the block or a power line I carry a Springfield XD .45 Cal. It will kill any unruly dog. And will put down a moose at close range. But if I am further from my home and getting into the remote or fishing anywhere, I will most certainly be packing my Super Red hawk .454 Casul with a 7 1/2" barrel. When standing up to a 10 Brown bear or a 1500 pound moose with calves I am not taking any chances. I see people posting with much smaller arms but I live in an area where people do get attacked by wild animals. We just recently had as group of 7 people get attacked by one bear. That is the largest group ever attacked by a wild animal. If one of them would have been packing then things would have turned out differently. Many people get stomped by moose every year. I have been chased into my home and car by them several times in my own driveway.

As for the dog comment. I am. Dog lover but I am not going to just stand there while some idiot that wants a dangerous dog s he can be super cool lets his dog loose and maul my children.

My at the time 10 year old daughter was attacked on the roadway by a neighbors dog while she was walking home from school. The man's excuse when I confronted him was that the dog was defending it's property! He actually said his dog was defending itss property from a 10 year old girl on her way from school.

Greycliff gunman
March 13, 2013, 02:59 AM
AZ mike, I completely agree. Nothing like seasoning a warm meal for a charging bear like pepper spray in the face. Here in AK the bears always say "send more tourists, the last ones were delicious".

Greycliff gunman
March 13, 2013, 03:37 AM
I know of a man walking from his home to his neighbors on a gravel road just outside the city limits Soldotna Ak. He was carrying a .454 casul. He heard a rustling in the bushes. He had enough time to pull his gun a and get one shot off. The 1000 lb. Brown bear literally fell at his feet. If that would have been a 9 mm what would the outcome be. A bear can reach speed of 45 miles an hour. And can get to those speeds faster than a ferarri.

My best friend likes to hike. He hikes one of the most difficult trails in Alaska frequently. One time he was driving by in his work rig. A semi. He decided to climb it. Its a mile and a half to the top and over 3000 feet in elevation. He can climb it in less than an hour. Pretty amazing times. Tis time he wasn't packing. While relaxing at the top he saw a brown bear several hundred yards away. He decided to make his presence known. Bad idea. The bruin charged and didn't stop. All he could do was run. He doesn't know how close the bear came but he made it down off the mountain in 23 minutes. The name is the trail is called Skyline.

willypete
March 13, 2013, 09:14 AM
The man's excuse when I confronted him was that the dog was defending it's property! He actually said his dog was defending itss property from a 10 year old girl on her way from school.

While the dog owner is certainly responsible for his dog's behavior (dog should have been fenced, chained, on a leash under supervision, or inside), it's very plausible that the dog perceived your daughter as a threat which was invading its space. By no means am I absolving the irresponsible owner, but the dog is just an animal with no capacity for understanding that a little girl isn't a threat. Another case of dumb owner, unfortunate dog. Was your little girl ok? How bad of an attack was it and what happened afterward?

Your posts make me think of the saying, "when in Rome, do as the Romans do." When in Alaska, it makes sense to carry much more powerful hardware than were I camping in the Appalachians or even the Rockies.

mrnic3guy1989
March 13, 2013, 11:38 AM
I carry my G21 with 230 grain FMJs. If my tax return ever comes ill pay off my G20 and carry buffalo bore FMJs.

scotjute
March 13, 2013, 12:54 PM
On my last back-packing trip, ~20 miles from Mexico, took 3" Ruger SP101 and 5 xtra rounds. Lightest revolver with longest barrell combo that I feel confident with. Probably about 2 lbs. Black bear and cougars are largest animals. Biggest fear is running into them unexpectedly or at nite. Have never really needed a fire-arm, but when your miles from nowhere, rather be safe than sorry. Try to keep my pack to 30 lbs. Water is biggest problem.

Greycliff gunman
March 13, 2013, 06:21 PM
While the dog owner is certainly responsible for his dog's behavior (dog should have been fenced, chained, on a leash under supervision, or inside), it's very plausible that the dog perceived your daughter as a threat which was invading its space. By no means am I absolving the irresponsible owner, but the dog is just an animal with no capacity for understanding that a little girl isn't a threat. Another case of dumb owner, unfortunate dog. Was your little girl ok? How bad of an attack was it and what happened afterward?

Your posts make me think of the saying, "when in Rome, do as the Romans do." When in Alaska, it makes sense to carry much more powerful hardware than were I camping in the Appalachians or even the Rockies.
Hey wileypete. The dog did not get lead poisoning because of it. The owner wanted to fight me. I have dogs myself and they are part of the family, I am sure every decent human does. Luckily my daughter did not receive any permanant scars physically. But it chewed her arm up pretty good. My
Son was attaackkedd by the same dog later. Eventually the owner decided to get rid of the dog after biting at least 12 people 9 of which were children. My daughter did get suspended from school for taking an knife to school to protect herself. She was at least thinking of defending herself and not being a victim. The knife was so tiny though it would not have done any good. She did not want to get bitten again that's for sure.

pintler
March 13, 2013, 10:51 PM
...3" Ruger SP101 and 5 xtra rounds. Lightest revolver with longest barrell combo...

S&W 329PD - an inch longer barrel, 1.9 oz lighter. Not cheaper, though :-

I wish S&W would make a super duper lightweight .357 J frame with a 4 inch barrel for not-grizz country - maybe 16 oz.

willypete
March 14, 2013, 10:27 AM
Hey wileypete. The dog did not get lead poisoning because of it. The owner wanted to fight me. I have dogs myself and they are part of the family, I am sure every decent human does. Luckily my daughter did not receive any permanant scars physically. But it chewed her arm up pretty good. My
Son was attaackkedd by the same dog later. Eventually the owner decided to get rid of the dog after biting at least 12 people 9 of which were children. My daughter did get suspended from school for taking an knife to school to protect herself. She was at least thinking of defending herself and not being a victim. The knife was so tiny though it would not have done any good. She did not want to get bitten again that's for sure.

That owner seems to be a jerk; dogs are better off without him! Sorry to hear your kids got chewed on, but your daughter sounds like a fighter. :D

SDGlock23
March 14, 2013, 10:46 AM
Glock 21 stuffed with .45 Super is about ideal IMHO. 250gr handloads (JHP or hardcast) at over 1,150 fps, and 275gr hardcasts at 1,100 fps. Not like a 230gr XTP at almost 1250 fps wouldn't work either. Plus I've got 13+1rd capacity.

Pilot
March 14, 2013, 10:48 AM
Walther PPK in 7.65 mil. It's got a delivery like a brick through a plate glass window. Should be fine for anything one should encounter on a hike.

I am tired of getting my tuxedo dirty, however.


:evil:

460Kodiak
March 14, 2013, 01:27 PM
I've been bit by a dog before. If I had been hiking rather than at work, and was carrying, the dog would be dead.

I am. Dog lover but I am not going to just stand there while some idiot that wants a dangerous dog s he can be super cool lets his dog loose and maul my children.

Me too. If a dog went after my theoretical kids, not only would it be dead, but it would be kicked afterward too. I love animals, but I have no tolerance for vicious dogs or owners of dogs that let them run a muck. I almost got attacked last summer by a huge black lab. It got about 5 feet away and just kept barking. I wound up to kick it in the face and it jumped back, so apparently it has been kicked before. I was in a state where my permit was no good, so all I had was pepper spray. If that thing had twitched when it got close, if would have gotten sprayed. I can't believe I had the restraint I did.

Had one follow me home from work too. I was walking home from my office, so I wasn't armed. The thing just kept running up to me barking and growling. Finally I had enough and went after it instead. It ran off when it relized it had picked the wrong one. If it had lept at me, it would have had a knife in it's belly, and I would have been going to the hospital for a bite wound to my arm.

On another time I was working in the woods near a private residence. A very large rotweiler came after me. I managed to make friends with that one. Once we had our tense moment, and she decided I wasn't a threat, she was my buddy. She would follow me around and come get pet when ever I had to be near her property.

Had a healer follow me for a day. I named him Bob. he was cool too. I meet a lot of dogs in the woods.

IdahoSkies
March 14, 2013, 01:50 PM
As my moniker may give it away, I live not only in bear country, but wolf country and backpack (not camp) frequently. I have 5 small kids that I take ranging from ages 2 to 9. A three day trip with my wife and our kids is pretty intense.

When I was younger, I carried nothing but what I needed. Now with all the wolf sign that I see I was not comfortable taking my kids out for that long with those predators around. Smaller people make for more advantageous targets. We did not have the wolves in the numbers we have them when I grew up.

Now when I go with my kids, I take a G29 with an extra G20 Mag. 25 rounds of 10mm. When I am by myself, I take my G29 with one mag. I found when compared to a magnum revolver the G29 on an ounce/power/capacity comparison was the right choice for me. I was not comfortable with 6 rounds and my five kids. Me, maybe, my kids, no. Wolves run in packs. and I have no confidence in my ability to reload 6 a round revolver in the time I felt I needed.

So long story short G29 and occasionally an extra magazine. This from a guy who is not found of Glocks and swore he'd never own one.

crestoncowboy
March 14, 2013, 04:53 PM
I carry the same hiking or camping. I live about 30 minutes from Damascus va. the appalachain trail Crosses the creeper trail bicycling trail there. My Glock 20 weighs 3 pounds fully loaded the model 29 weighs less. I don't carry extra mags and ten roun
d is plenty for me. If I have to dump a mag in a bear or person I figure my long trip will be cut short anyway. I have talked to quite a few backpackers some doing the whole app.trail and id say 1/4 were carrying. Most carrying 22s. The standard from those i've talked too is 3 or 4 pairs of shoes in their pack. So is a 2 lb Glock going to hurt.
That said to all those suggesting a long gun, I have been on multiple day hunts and a rifle turns into a cumbersome Bastard really fast. Crawling through laurel bushes, checking out caves, climbing over rocks. I'm in good shape and the weight of a Lever gun isn't the issue, but even a slung rifle will snag and bump on anything within 6 feet.lol also at least for the Appalachian trail, it Crosses near Towns and other trails, as well as going by popular fishing streams and rivers, people have been robbed, i'm not sure id want everyone to know I was carrying. I'll keep my little 10s

VBVAGUY
March 15, 2013, 09:49 AM
http://img.geocaching.com/cache/log/b8e1156f-6eb1-4c2c-b8f6-c5e55226b23e.jpg




Wow this is an AWESOME picture !!! I can only imagine the beautiful sunset and sunrise you see from this location !!! Thanks for sharing. God Bless :)

The_Armed_Therapist
March 15, 2013, 10:27 AM
Really? Are we talking camping (if you have a cooler, you're camping) or backpacking (if you've considered cutting the tags off your sleeping bag, you're backpacking)? Do you bring the three guns including a rifle for fun or because you feel you need three guns for protection?

Never been "backpacking" I don't think. I'm just talking about a couple hours to a day's hike through the woods, mountains, or desert for fun with friends and family. I have a rifle everywhere it's socially acceptable. I'd carry one to work if it were allowed, and to Walmart if it didn't cause a panic.

The_Armed_Therapist
March 15, 2013, 10:30 AM
Do you bring the three guns including a rifle for fun or because you feel you need three guns for protection?

This is an irrelevant question. It's a way of life. I don't do so because it's super fun to carry a rifle through the woods, or because I feel that I need tons of protection. It's a way of life. Two pistols always where legally allowed. Where allowed and accepted, a rifle. It's that simple.

41magsnub
March 15, 2013, 04:46 PM
For day hikes and longer I pack either my 4" security six or my m&p45 midsize both with the meanest hardcast rounds available in a pancake holster.

When I run the dog up a small MTN trail after work I'm lazy, I just leave the j frame in my pocket since I don't want to take the time to regear.

Macchina
March 15, 2013, 07:07 PM
This is an irrelevant question. It's a way of life. I don't do so because it's super fun to carry a rifle through the woods, or because I feel that I need tons of protection. It's a way of life. Two pistols always where legally allowed. Where allowed and accepted, a rifle. It's that simple.
No offense but you should never be anywhere that requires a "way of life" which involves carrying 3 guns. Most soldiers in an active war zone looking for a fight don't carry 3 guns... Not judging, just comparing.

batmann
March 16, 2013, 10:33 AM
No Bears or Mountain Lions in Indiana where I hike, but real problem is wild dogs and Coyotes.
I will usually carry my Ruger SR 22 pistol loaded with CCI Stingers. It is light and accurate. If I am camping (tent) I bring my Ruger 50th Flattop in .357 stroked with 158 gr Double Tap HP. That is more for people protection now a days.
I am thinking of getting a Glock 29 SF or Gen 4 if I can find one and ammo to go with it. It would suffice as my all a round out door pistol.
Funny, I have a Glock 22 (.40) and never thought to carry it in place of the .357, just never seemed outdoorish. Now that I have put this in writing, may do a rethink.

EVIL
March 16, 2013, 02:32 PM
My "cardio-gun" as of late has been my Ruger SR-9c. Not for Ultra light Backpacking so much as strenuous, all-day, day hikes, trail cycling, kayaking etc. It carries light & compact enough to not interfere with whatever activity I am engaged in. The 10 rd magazine is enough for me as I EDC a 5-shot SP101 357 with one speed loader most days. In OH, the most likely threat is bad guys on the trails or trail-heads. Coyotes are more afraid of you in my experience, and I have never seen a black bear in OH.

When I travel for work, even to the "grizzly & puma infested" mountain west, I still pack the SR9c --- reason being it is relatively common inexpensive and I wouldn't cry too much if the airlines lost it and I got a check instead. I often take hikes up into the various mountain trails of UT, NM and I feel OK with just the 9mm round especially since it works for both country & city carry. Would I prefer to have one of my .45's or .357's - you bet. Again, I have seen way more people on the trails than mega-fauna. I have seen a bear before on a backpacking trip in northern NM but I maintained my distance and we each went our separate ways.

If I was regularly planning multiple-day backpacking trips I would evaluate my carry option in the favor of lightest option possible. Like a an air-weight J-frame. Last time I backpacked my pack weight was 43 Lbs. I don't relish carrying a sidearm & ammo that is 10% or more the weight of my gear - especially since additional weight can cause possible injury. To me, in remote areas, the biggest risks are exposure, dehydration, and personal injury or incapacitation due to an accident. Animal attack or badguys are definitely a much of a less likely concern (obviously depending where you are). I always conduct a little operational risk management and prioritize my gear and strategy to the most likely threats & risks.

bobmilekjr
March 17, 2013, 12:05 PM
If I'm not in bear country, I generally pack my Ruger GP100 .357 mag, and feel perfectly capable and safe. I've never noticed the weight on my hip, even after several days, with 30lb pack, or packing game out. If in bear country, and limited to a handgun, I'll pack either a Taurus Tracker .41 Mag or Ruger Redhawk .44 Mag, plus bear spray. If in bear country, and the situation allows, I feel much better with the bear spray and my Marlin Guide Gun .45-70, or a 12 gauge shotgun with slugs and buckshot.

bobmilekjr
March 17, 2013, 12:14 PM
If I'm not in bear country, I generally pack my Ruger GP100 .357 mag, and feel perfectly capable and safe. I've never noticed the weight on my hip, even after several days, with 30lb pack, or packing game out. If in bear country, and limited to a handgun, I'll pack either a Taurus Tracker .41 Mag or Ruger Redhawk .44 Mag, plus bear spray. If in bear country, and the situation allows, I feel much better with the bear spray and my Marlin Guide Gun .45-70, or a 12 gauge shotgun with slugs and buckshot.

Spindrift
March 17, 2013, 01:43 PM
The 'backpacking' I mainly do is the hiking during archery season which occasionally includes 2-3 overnighters in a spike tent. I typically cover 6 or 8 miles a day during bow season for elk and I carry the same pistol that I carry every day concealed.
Kimber TLE/RL-II full frame .45 with two spare mags.
The only difference is that when hiking, I pack her in a Blackhawk drop leg SERPA because there is no need for concealment.

Vern Humphrey
March 17, 2013, 03:03 PM
Okay, I'll throw a little goop in the game.

How many have actually used their gun while hiking? I usually carry a Colt Woodsman and have killed many a squirrel, and dealt with an occasional copperhead and feral dog.

Certaindeaf
March 17, 2013, 05:00 PM
Used? I'm a veritable Hansel and Gretel with my brass. lolz

Vern Humphrey
March 17, 2013, 05:13 PM
That's why when I carry a centerfire, it's a revolver. Them dang automatics spit out the brass and it slows your hike down when you have to get down on your hands and knees and look for it.

Deltaboy
March 17, 2013, 05:26 PM
Ruger MK II with 22 HP LR with 4 clips for a total of 40 loaded rounds.

YANKEE2500
March 17, 2013, 11:32 PM
Colt Agent, 38spl

psyopspec
March 18, 2013, 08:17 AM
How many have actually used their gun while hiking? I usually carry a Colt Woodsman and have killed many a squirrel, and dealt with an occasional copperhead and feral dog.

I've killed critters with a .22 while woods walking, but have never fired a gun that I brought on an actual multi-day hike. Much like CCW, it's not about the odds I'll need to deal with threat. It's about the stakes involved if a threat actually arises.

The_Armed_Therapist
March 18, 2013, 09:39 AM
No offense but you should never be anywhere that requires a "way of life" which involves carrying 3 guns. Most soldiers in an active war zone looking for a fight don't carry 3 guns... Not judging, just comparing.

OK, thanks for setting me straight. I'll stop. I should have known that I don't need them. :rolleyes:

Greycliff gunman
March 18, 2013, 09:34 PM
OK, thanks for setting me straight. I'll stop. I should have known that I don't need them. :rolleyes:
I don't mean to poke my nose in but I didn't see the original post claiming a "requirement" for a way of life. In the United States we have a right to carry. Does that mean we can carry only one, only two, only three, only 100. As best as I can tell a person can carry as many as they like or feel necessary. Depending on circumstances 3 may seem excessive but not wrong. When hunting I always carry two guns sometimes three. I always have my hunting rifle and my back up .454 Casul. In the fall time I like to carry a .22 caliber pistol as well for grouse. If I am going shooting in may bring up to ten guns, only cause its fun.

Heysoos
March 19, 2013, 12:06 AM
When hunting, I always carry a sidearm; was just raised to do it. But backpacking, I've rarely taken a gun and thankfully never needed it. I have a hike coming up on the Olympic Peninsula in WA, and it's known high-density black bear area. Considering taking my Kahr MK9. I realize it's under powered, but it's all I've got. Gun, holster, 6 round and 7 round mags come in at just over two lbs and I'm cringing at the weight, but I'm thinking I would sleep a lot better.

Considering the meth problem we have around here, maybe I should carry more often while hiking.

harrygunner
March 19, 2013, 03:12 AM
I usually spend a few days to a week alone, hiking miles away from the trailhead.

I take one of these, depending on what also occupies the area. I live in a state that has mountain lions, wolves, black and grizzly bears.

http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d199/harrygunner/hiking/woodsguns.jpg

The shoulder holster is worn over a shirt and under a cover garment. The backpack goes on last. The rig fits nicely in the void under my arm.

Mainsail
March 19, 2013, 10:36 AM
I have a hike coming up on the Olympic Peninsula in WA, and it's known high-density black bear area.

I've done a lot of hiking in the Olympics and I anxiously await the day I'll be lucky enough to see a bear. They're pretty shy so it may be that I'm just too noisy. I've seen bear scat when away from the trail system hiking into the Wonder Mountain Wilderness, some of it very fresh too, but never a bear. I once saw a cougar while I was driving the waterline road up behind Quilcene- huge beautiful cat just strolling along the rutted dirt road. It got tired of looking over its shoulder at my jeep creeping up behind it and took off into forest.

Your Kahr should be enough for the cats. Bears are seldom a problem.

460Kodiak
March 19, 2013, 01:06 PM
How many have actually used their gun while hiking? I usually carry a Colt Woodsman and have killed many a squirrel, and dealt with an occasional copperhead and feral dog.

I have not had to fire, but I did draw my FNP-45. I got a feeling something was watching me. I was up on a mountain road at dusk and was walking back to my truck alone. I turned and something brown ducked down and didn't move when I turned and looked.

The only brown critters we have here that are dangerous and that size are mountain lions. If it had been a deer, it would have ran away. I still can't say for sure it was a cat, but being dusk, and how it moved, something was just un-deer like about it. I walked the last half of a mile back with my 45 in hand, cocked and locked. Spooked me pretty bad. There are a lot of lion tracks in the snow on that mountain all winter.

Vern Humphrey
March 19, 2013, 01:30 PM
The only brown critters we have here that are dangerous and that size are mountain lions. If it had been a deer, it would have ran away. I still can't say for sure it was a cat, but being dusk, and how it moved, something was just un-deer like about it. I walked the last half of a mile back with my 45 in hand, cocked and locked. Spooked me pretty bad. There are a lot of lion tracks in the snow on that mountain all winter.
There are mountain lions in Arkansas -- i've seen one crossing the county road where I live -- and black bears. We have a bear season, and I've seen bears in my back yard (I live in the middle of the woods.)

Generally, when hiking, though, I carry the Woodsman. But there are plenty of times I carry a .45 Colt.

mcdonl
March 19, 2013, 01:32 PM
During trapping season. .22 SA revolver, any other time it depends. If in the back country my SBH and if local woods and trails my detective special.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Tony_the_tiger
March 19, 2013, 11:00 PM
Hiking in black bear country I carry a 4" Ruger Gp100 with Buffalo Bore 180 grain hard cast flat nose gas-checked rounds @1400 ft/s.

Scipio Africanus
March 20, 2013, 01:19 AM
The same thing I do every other day. A S&W 629 4".

armsmaster270
March 20, 2013, 01:25 AM
Depending on where I am going, a Sig226/357Sig, S&W 6" 586 .357Mag or a 6" 44Mag.

Like one of these.

http://i239.photobucket.com/albums/ff207/armsmaster270/Guns/handguns.jpg

Greycliff gunman
March 20, 2013, 03:40 AM
Okay, I'll throw a little goop in the game.

How many have actually used their gun while hiking? I usually carry a Colt Woodsman and have killed many a squirrel, and dealt with an occasional copperhead and feral dog.
I have shot toward a charging cow moose, not at it. Only wanted to stop the attack not kill it, it worked long enough to make as getaway. Have also pulled out on a human to protect myself and my children. No shots fired but definitely got the point across. also while hiking have gotten that feeling and unholstered my weapon. I have had a brownie popping its teeth at me while I was passing through. That will make you very nervous indeed.

TAKtical
March 20, 2013, 05:34 AM
After hearing about some recent incidents with criminals on "bath salts" I started carrying a 3rd spare 20rnd mag for my Glock 17.

ku4hx
March 20, 2013, 02:43 PM
10mm ... either my Smith 1006 or my Glock 20. Either is loaded with my cast 175 grain TCL at about 1,150 fps. Super accurate in both guns coupled with the deep penetration I want for the four legged critters I might face. Two legged also for that matter.

gandog56
March 20, 2013, 06:41 PM
What's hiking???


Seriously, two total knee replacements means I don't walk for long times, especially going up and down hills and mountains....etc. The only thing that determines what I carry is the temperature out side. Cold, got a nice coat and a denim jacket that lets me comfortably carry something up to full size 1911's. Tee shirt and shorts day? Something in an IWB that is small and doesn't reveal I am carrying that day. Long pants, regular shirt? Opens the options a bit more, can carry like .380 ACP to 10mm.

Elkins45
March 20, 2013, 07:19 PM
Depends on what particular threat I'm more concerned about. In this part of the state I've carried my Kahr P9, but I've also carried a scandium J frame in my front pocket.

In places where there are bears I usually carry a S&W or Glock 10mm. I bought a used scandium 44 magnum (329PD) thinking it would be the ideal solution. Turns out it was completely unreliable with anything approaching full power loads, so I settled for 10+ round capacity instead. With 200 gr full power 10mm loads I feel pretty good about taking on any threat I will encounter east of the MS.

WvHiker
March 21, 2013, 06:35 PM
I generally bring a 3" SP101 in .357 magnum. I bought it for hiking.

mic214
March 21, 2013, 08:20 PM
I live in the mountains of Southeastern New Mexico (7600+ elevation) surrounded by National Forest. We have a pretty good population of bear and mountain lion around these parts.

When I venture into the woods, I carry either a S&W 629 or a Ruger SBH .44 magnum in the spring/summer months or a S&W 625 Mountain Gun in .45acp in the fall/winter months.

Around the ranch, which is at 5600ft, we have a rattler or two, so in addition to one of the above sidearms, I pack a Ruger .22 single action loaded with snake shot.....

tahoe2
March 28, 2013, 10:54 PM
If I'm hiking I must be scouting, fishing (scouting with a pole), or hunting,
in which case I bring one of these. 41, 41, or 357.
181992

TreeDoc
March 28, 2013, 11:49 PM
Little ruger bearcat on most walks and camping trips. Haven't 'hiked' in quite awhile. Not many bears where I go. Sometime a glock 26 or a light sw 638.

336A
March 29, 2013, 09:00 AM
I haven't taken the time to read through this entire thread but all I can say is WOW. After reading through only a couple of posts, one would be led to believe that there are all sorts of animals hiding behind trees just waiting to pounce upon the unsuspecting camper/hiker:rolleyes: I'd be more worried about two legged vermin or the possibility of crossing paths with a rabid critter than anything else which is easly handled with a .22.

Growing up our family did a lot of camping way out on the back of my grandparents farm, way back in the boondocks. The firearm of choice for my father was always a .22 revovler, never once did he ever need it. Some years ago as a young infantry team leader at a instalation in northern NY which has a large and healthy population of bears. I was awaken one night to the sounds of a couple of Soldiers talking rather loudly. Wondering what all the fuss was about I asked what in the world was going on and who was out gaurding the ammo.

I was imediately informed that there was a bear out there which according to one of them, just stood there watching him. Obviously the bear didn't chase him down and devour him or otherwise harm him. After a few brisk words the individual was back at his post with no incident. In all of my years stationed there (10) whenever I saw a bear it was always the south end of it as it ran off like a scalded dog, or it didn't stick around long for a photo op. So so much for having to worry about the ever present angry man eating bears.

Sure bears can be a potential problem, but if a modicom of common sense is used, more often than not they won't be. When I went squirrel hunting with my .22 I never had a issue with one either, much less even see one. From what I've read so far here there is a bunch of unwarranted paranoia where black bears are concerned. Keep the twinkies out of your tent/sleeping bag, and don't feed the wildlife and you won't have an issue. Now grizzly bears is another story all together, but the last time I checked there haven't been any of those around here in the east in a couple hundred years.

Vern Humphrey
March 29, 2013, 10:33 AM
I agree with you. I usually carry a Colt Woodsman, although when it's deer season I'll carry a .45 Colt.

460Kodiak
March 29, 2013, 10:35 AM
Keep the twinkies out of your tent/sleeping bag, and don't feed the wildlife and you won't have an issue.

This is true, but there is still a chance you will stumble into one that has cubs, or one that is just generally crabby. Never discount the .01%, as they are out there. A trail gun is like a condom. Better to have it and.............

Yes, the west and griz are a different story. It doesn't take much to piss them off. Your best bet is to make noise and let them know where you are so they can get annoyed and leave. I think a lot of people forget about moose. They can be just as dangerous as a griz given the circumstances.

People are usually my main concern too, but if I'm going to carrry a gun for protection from people, I'm also going to make sure it can take down any other threat that I may encounter. I agree animals are not just waiting around to pounce on you. Most animals, even predators, do not see humans as a food source.

Working in the woods of the west on a regular basis gives you a different perspective. I've been bit by dogs, chased by very big dogs, nearly ran over by white tailed dear that had been spooked by a dirt bike, nearly ran over by elk that were spooked by a coworker, heard mountin lions scream when I got a little to close to them by accident, been followed by a lion, been chased by a domestic bull (I've never run that fast before.) gotten a little to close to a griz, I'been charged by a white tail deer in the rut twice, and had one jackass try to scare me away from his land with a shotgun in hand (That one went to court as my employer pressed charges, since I did nothing wrong. I was on federal land NEAR his home.). Things can and do happen. Being prepared is just good planning, which means bringing a gun that can settle all accounts based on your surroundings.

Unfortunately, my employer does not allow me to carry on the job, so the irony of what I just said is not lost on me. Of course, I'm alive, and who knows? Being armed may have made things worse.

hentown
March 29, 2013, 05:43 PM
I do my dead-level best not to ever actually hike. When I actually bike, however, I carry a G26, the same G26 that I carry when I'm just circumambulating in my daily life.

AKMtnRunner
March 30, 2013, 12:48 AM
In the mountains behind Anchorage, where I usually see half a dozen black or brown bears each year, I usually carry bear spray. I run at a good clip with the canister ready in my hand. I also make noise like calling out "hey ho, hey bear!" frequently and especially around blind corners.

The spray would be very effective on threatening people and dogs and without as much paper work.

Threatening bear encounters are extremely rare. I recall at least 20 bear sightings in the last several years and zero times did they want to get any closer to me. Statistically speaking, we're probably better off protecting ourselves by wearing a helmet every time we get into a car but we don't do that.

I do have a 500 S&W mag, 44 mag, and a glock 10mm however I've yet to find a suitable way to carry comfortably and be ready quick enough should the need arise. Though I continue to look for carry options. Even my glock 29 would be a nice touch.

Inebriated
March 30, 2013, 03:38 AM
Up til now, it's been a G21. I'm annoyed with the weight, so I'm either going to go for a G32/33 or a G30/29.

Whichever would replace my daily carry (19 and 26), so I'm in the process of deciding which cartridges do what I want the best.

MikePaiN
March 30, 2013, 07:32 AM
I do most of my hiking here in CT so I don't worry about overly large animals. Like most of the Northeast population is dense ( :( ) even in the wilderness areas, human threats are probably a more likely problem in the field.
Anyway, when I hike I carry whatever I might be using for EDC which is a small 9mm or .45acp.
I do change my ammo load when I hike. I'm usually loaded up with Golden Saber(in either cal.) for EDC. If on a hike I'm taking a 9mm I switch to bonded PDX1 +P or if I have a .45 I'll usually load up with FMJ.

460Kodiak
March 30, 2013, 03:50 PM
I do have a 500 S&W mag, 44 mag, and a glock 10mm however I've yet to find a suitable way to carry comfortably and be ready quick enough should the need arise. Though I continue to look for carry options. Even my glock 29 would be a nice touch.

I carry my 460V in a Desantes hip holster, cross draw, with suspenders between my undershirt and outer shirt to keep the pants up. I'm a thin guy so my pants would slide down without the suspenders, or I would have to have my belt tightened to the point that I wouldn't be able to feel my legs. It is a comfortable way to carry for a day. Backpacking and a 3.75 lb revolver don't usually mix to well where ounces count. I can unsnap the thumbstrap with my left hand and draw with the right mighty quick. I am thin, but a large guy, so firing it one handed is pretty dooable for me, but bringing the other hand up for a proper grip is fast too. Check out S&W's holsters. If you have the full length 8 3/8ths inch bbl though on your 500, it may not work so good. But hey, if you're happy with bear spray, than more power to ya.

It wouldn't be any good for running though.

Greycliff gunman
April 1, 2013, 05:54 AM
People get mauled by bears in Alaska every year, probably the same in Yellowstone. I know several people who have been charged by black bear and brown bears. I even witnessed a group of tourists on the side of the road get charged by a brownie while taking pics. I have had them follow me through the woods popping their teeth at me. That gets a little worry some. Then anything that moves becomes a threat like porcupine under your feet or grouse. A former mayor here was attacked and lived by a bear. Another guy walking down the road barely got one shot off before it fell dead at his feet after jumping out of the brush on the side of the road. Moose are even worse they will stomp you and your kids. A friend from my church had one of his kids stomped by a moose at the bus stop. Wild animals are unpredictable. I have been attacked by seagulls. You have to be prepared. If you think a 9mm is going to stop a charging bears think again. Your .380 won't stop a moose. I have been charged by moose in my yard. Its the same reason we wear seat belts or helmets. For just in case. Not cause its cool, you want to be protected. I carry a .454 casul super red hawk and pepper spray anytime I plan on leaving the road. The reason for a double action is cause friend of mine got one shot off while being attacked by a bear and was afraid he would lose his gun if he tried to pull the hammer back on his single action. Luckily the bear died from the .44 magnum round.

RJTravel
April 2, 2013, 12:48 AM
...all I can say is WOW...one would be led to believe that there are all sorts of animals hiding behind trees just waiting to pounce...:rolleyes:...easly handled with a .22...in northern NY...there was a bear out there...didn't chase him down and devour him...whenever I saw a bear it was always the south end of it as it ran off...so much for having to worry about the ever present angry man eating bears...don't feed the wildlife and you won't have an issue...


Wow! You have merely demonstrated that you have never backpacked in the real western wilderness. I have been backpacking in the west since 1955, and have had a number of encounters. Twice I have shot bear under 15 yards. Contrary to common b/b opinion you have time to shoot a charging bear if you remain calm and smooth - I've done it. I've been f2f with lion that would not back off whatsoever, and many, many times within yards of moose that were not the least afraid of me. Three years ago I hiked in the Tongass N.F., Alaska - solo and unarmed. Never again. Grizzlies vastly outnumber people - I viewed a large number of them and never once saw their 'south end' running away. When the salmon are running you can get as close as you want to dozens of griz. They are not afraid of you. Come to the wilderness sometime and get educated before giving advice that could easily get someone killed.

460Kodiak
April 2, 2013, 08:51 AM
and get educated before giving advice that could easily get someone killed.

exactly

eldon519
April 2, 2013, 09:58 AM
Wow! You have merely demonstrated that you have never backpacked in the real western wilderness. I have been backpacking in the west since 1955, and have had a number of encounters. Twice I have shot bear under 15 yards. Contrary to common b/b opinion you have time to shoot a charging bear if you remain calm and smooth - I've done it. I've been f2f with lion that would not back off whatsoever, and many, many times within yards of moose that were not the least afraid of me. Three years ago I hiked in the Tongass N.F., Alaska - solo and unarmed. Never again. Grizzlies vastly outnumber people - I viewed a large number of them and never once saw their 'south end' running away. When the salmon are running you can get as close as you want to dozens of griz. They are not afraid of you. Come to the wilderness sometime and get educated before giving advice that could easily get someone killed.

That's a little harsh. I'd have to look again, but I don't think the OP specified grizzly country or Alaska. I agree with you for maybe 3 states. For the other 47, I'm with 336A. If you ask this question on a dedicated gun forum, 99% of people will tell you to carry something. If you ask this on a dedicated backpacking forum, outside of hunters, most will tell you it's unnecessary outside of Alaska. You pack your fears with your gear. Outside of hunters, the only guy I've seen carry a gun while hiking was a first-timer. Little did he realize the denim jeans and cotton shirt he had on were probably the biggest threat to his life. Cotton kills. Loaned him some of my wool for the night.

Mainsail
April 2, 2013, 11:37 AM
That’s the problem that always comes up in these threads. How do you define hiking or backpacking (vs camping) and where geographically do you intend to do it (whatever ‘it’ is)?

Here in Washington we have day-hikes, multi day backpacking, severe terrain, scrambling, and serious climbing. We also have yahoos who drive their trucks into the forest to drink beer, do drugs, and play soldier. If you ask them, they are hiking or camping- unless they packed their clothes and gear into a CFP90 in which case they’ll tell you they’re backpacking.

Alaska is a whole different discussion- and one certainly worth having if the OP was going there. Nevertheless I’ve backpacked into the wilderness here (no trails into, and no trails within the wilderness) like hundreds do every season, and you don’t need a hand cannon and twenty extra reloads for it. If you believe you do, then you either don’t hike regularly or you’re paranoid. The majority of hikers, backpackers, scramblers, and climbers (I would estimate 99% or higher) do not carry any protection whatsoever. If there were problems with the wildlife, trust me, those of us in the hiking community would hear about it- we have forums too.

The greatest threats to you in the wilderness out here are getting lost, falls, and hypothermia. In Alaska you may easily get lost, sprain your ankle, start shivering, and fall into a grizzly bear’s mouth, but for the rest of us it’s just those three. Those are the things you need to gear up for. Some of us carry a sidearm because it’s a part of our daily lives anyway- but we’re realistic about its utility.

eldon519
April 2, 2013, 02:00 PM
Amen, Mainsail.

Vern Humphrey
April 2, 2013, 02:13 PM
Welll . . . here in Arkansas, a hiker camping on the Ozark Highlands Trail had a black bear drag his tent off -- and he was still inside!!

Stevie-Ray
April 2, 2013, 02:49 PM
Sure bears can be a potential problem, but if a modicom of common sense is used, more often than not they won't be.Potential? More often than not? You've just perfectly illustrated why many of us choose the weapon we use in the wild.

I pack my 10mm, hoping I won't need it, and knowing there's a better than 98% chance I won't. That's far from thinking there are "all sorts of animals waiting to pounce.":rolleyes:

mrnic3guy1989
April 2, 2013, 02:59 PM
I used to take a g32 with an extra mag but now days just my g20 no spare mag in PA if I need more than that something ain't right.

336A
April 2, 2013, 03:29 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by 336A
...all I can say is WOW...one would be led to believe that there are all sorts of animals hiding behind trees just waiting to pounce......easly handled with a .22...in northern NY...there was a bear out there...didn't chase him down and devour him...whenever I saw a bear it was always the south end of it as it ran off...so much for having to worry about the ever present angry man eating bears...don't feed the wildlife and you won't have an issue...


Wow! You have merely demonstrated that you have never backpacked in the real western wilderness. I have been backpacking in the west since 1955, and have had a number of encounters. Twice I have shot bear under 15 yards. Contrary to common b/b opinion you have time to shoot a charging bear if you remain calm and smooth - I've done it. I've been f2f with lion that would not back off whatsoever, and many, many times within yards of moose that were not the least afraid of me. Three years ago I hiked in the Tongass N.F., Alaska - solo and unarmed. Never again. Grizzlies vastly outnumber people - I viewed a large number of them and never once saw their 'south end' running away. When the salmon are running you can get as close as you want to dozens of griz. They are not afraid of you. Come to the wilderness sometime and get educated before giving advice that could easily get someone killed.


RjTravel, thanks for showing your crass ignorance and lack of comprehension. I offered up but a few examples of my experiences, no where in my post did I offer up any specific adivce to anyone. I also didn't offer up any specific advice to anyone about hiking/camping in the western U.S., Alaska, or anything to do with mosse or grizzly bears. As a matter of fact in my post I said that grizzly bears are another story all together.

My post was more in response to the prevelant paranoia that abounds in these posts where Black Bears enter the into the discussion. Do black bears kill folks...? yes, but not with the frequency that many here seem to think they do. People seem to think that attacks by black bears happen with such frequency that all of a sudden it's epidemic. Sorry folks but such is not the case, fact is 99% will turn tail and run as soon as they get the fantest scent of a human.

Mainsail hit the nail on the head in his post on this subject. Thats all I'm gonna say on the matter.

Stevie-Ray
April 3, 2013, 03:20 PM
My post was more in response to the prevelant paranoia that abounds in these posts where Black Bears enter the into the discussion. Do black bears kill folks...? yes, but not with the frequency that many here seem to think they do. People seem to think that attacks by black bears happen with such frequency that all of a sudden it's epidemic.Are you kidding me? If you're inferring that, you've got a lot of guts berating somebody about crass ignorance and lack of comprehension, because I haven't seen that at all. And you are still illustrating a need as emphasised above. Do you carry at all? If so, you must realize the same odds apply that you'll need a gun then as well. If you don't, you have no business commenting to those of us that always do, and simply change caliber or weapon to suit the potential need. Personally, I carry 10mm in the Huron National Forest because the blackie is the largest animal that can potentially harm me. Not so in the Detroit area where I carry .45 ACP, though I feel that the odds are about the same I'll need a gun at all. Good Lord, you sound like somebody from PETA. Either that, or you want everybody to think you are far more manly than they.:rolleyes:

I am so sick of the word paranoia I could puke.

Jackal
April 3, 2013, 04:11 PM
I pack a Taurus Titanium .44SPL snubbie. Plenty of gun for the pacific northwest loaded with Keith style 240gr handloads.

Inebriated
April 3, 2013, 05:21 PM
Goodness, bear discussions are like our own ugly version of Godwin's Law. Give it enough time, and every discussion on a gun forum will result in a discussion about how to kill a bear. Gonna start referring to it as Inebriated's Law. Now how the hell do I make a Wiki page?

pharmdon
April 3, 2013, 05:28 PM
I hike and mountain bike the appalachain trail a lot. I carry my G19 in a maxpedition pack. Has pocket for easy/fast drawing, but like anything else, you need to practice drawing from a bag/pouch if you are not used to it.

Certaindeaf
April 3, 2013, 06:45 PM
I find that my petticoats are just able to accomodate some smelling salts.

balin
April 3, 2013, 07:32 PM
i usually carry my 386pd 19 oz's of .357 mag holding 7 rounds. the full size grip makes multiple shots reliable. had it with me most every friday last summer for hiking in Mt Rainier. if not that i usually carry my 329pd, 44 mag if i am scrambling in the woods for mushrooms and don't mind the extra weight. it weighs 25 oz's.

Deaf Smith
April 3, 2013, 10:48 PM
Well I just perfected my 'light' field gun for the woods.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=182272&d=1365043509

A 3 inch 'Canadian' GP-100 ex-police gun.

The Canadians filed the front sight down and it would shoot a bit high. I replaced the front sight with a S&W blade (tight fit but it worked) and replaced the roll pin Ruger used as the S&W sight had no hole and thus I had to drill a new hole in the sight. Super tight fit on that front one.

Well with 158gr LSW gas checked slugs backed by 8 grains of Unique I got 20 yard dead on groups of 3 inches, standing firing two handed SA.

The GP is zero-zero (that is it locks TIGHT, no play at all) and the action I slicked up as good as a S&W K frame. Did the same to my SP-101 in the picture to and it is also zero-zero!

Yes I still have my .44 Mountain Gun but this rosco is easier to pack in Texas.

Deaf

RJTravel
April 3, 2013, 10:56 PM
...anything to do with mosse...fact is 99% will turn tail and run...

If you are that concerned about a mouse then I have a suggestion - bring a large stuffed cat with you the next time you backpack. Position it just outside your tent door and it will get the attention of every mouse in the vicinity. Mice problem solved and you can sleep soundly.

It is good to know that your vast experience with many thousands of black bear gives assurance that virtually all of them will run at the first sound you make. The one charge I experienced and the two I shot at very close range (among others) might have been a nightmare brought on by fear of mice, according to you. I'm sure we all know that black bear will strip berries, leaves, and branchs during berry season and are oblivious to anything else. You can stumble right into them, but I will bow to your vast knowledge and advise everyone not to worry about it since they will turn tail and run.

460Kodiak
April 4, 2013, 09:22 AM
I can't believe this one is still going. T minus 5...... 4....... 3.......

gp911
April 4, 2013, 01:00 PM
Petticoats & smelling salts, hilarious! I'm surprised at how many people carrying semis don't pack a spare mag given that magazines cause a lot of malfunctions.

eldon519
April 4, 2013, 04:14 PM
If you are that concerned about a mouse then I have a suggestion - bring a large stuffed cat with you the next time you backpack. Position it just outside your tent door and it will get the attention of every mouse in the vicinity. Mice problem solved and you can sleep soundly.

It is good to know that your vast experience with many thousands of black bear gives assurance that virtually all of them will run at the first sound you make. The one charge I experienced and the two I shot at very close range (among others) might have been a nightmare brought on by fear of mice, according to you. I'm sure we all know that black bear will strip berries, leaves, and branchs during berry season and are oblivious to anything else. You can stumble right into them, but I will bow to your vast knowledge and advise everyone not to worry about it since they will turn tail and run.

I hope with all my heart this is a joke. Hopefully you realize "mosse" is more likely a misspelling of "moose" than "mouse" in this context.

RJTravel
April 5, 2013, 12:16 AM
I hope with all my heart this is a joke. Hopefully you realize "mosse" is more likely a misspelling of "moose" than "mouse" in this context.

RU4 real?

AKMtnRunner
April 5, 2013, 12:59 AM
I can't believe this one is still going. T minus 5...... 4....... 3.......
2........ 1........

jhco50
April 5, 2013, 04:28 AM
I like to carry a single-action .357 or .45 colt in a Buscadero rig.

eldon519
April 5, 2013, 08:41 AM
RU4 real?

Yeah. I just didn't find it very funny, and it was quite long for a quip off a misspelling which made me wonder if you were actually trying to make a joke or actually thought it was supposed to be "mouse."

KenW.
April 5, 2013, 02:15 PM
I haven't taken the time to read all the prior posts. Has any said a water bottle? That's what I take as well as a Bond .410 derringer.

We have no bears around here; and verrrrrry few if any mountain lions near civilization.

RJTravel
April 5, 2013, 07:46 PM
Yeah. I just didn't find it very funny, and it was quite long for a quip off a misspelling which made me wonder if you were actually trying to make a joke or actually thought it was supposed to be "mouse."
No one cares if you didn't find it funny. There are undertaker's forums which may be more suitable to your tastes.

For others: With tongue-in-cheek intentions - the prior poster is certain that "99% (of all bears) will turn tail and run". This tells me that 1% will attack you according to him. We will be conservative and suppose he has encountered 1,200 bears in his lifetime of vast experience. That means that he has been viciously mauled at least 12 times. His body must be a mass of scar tissue. Not one to give general advice on how to survive. I am not so brave and learned my lesson after the first scare. My advice would be that not every animal will swap twat-a-twat upon a mere tete-a-tete.

grimjaw
April 9, 2013, 06:12 PM
When hiking, I carry a S&W 638 in a pouch attached to one of my backpack straps, a speedloader and, if I'm worried about it, a couple of snakeshot cartridges. I don't worry about bears much since they are usually hightailing it, but they do get hungrier and less picky in the fall.

Jaxondog
April 10, 2013, 04:06 PM
I've alway's carried an Anaconda in my backpack, thinking if I needed to use it I would be able to get it out fast enough. Wrong. My wife and I had an encounter with a black bear while walking a trail off the Blue Ridge Parkway in N.C. 3 yr's ago.
It was a fairly dense trail and the bear came out of nowhere. I swear it was like the blink of an eye that he appeared 25 to 30 feet in front of us. He stopped and looked at us while I am removing my backpack and before I could get it off, he started to run down the side of the trail. Had he charged us there would have been no time to get the pistol out before he would have been on us.
I guess the moral to this story is I don't carry in a backpack anymore. It's a Glock 20 on the hip. That made a believer out of me that if you don't alway's expect the worse to happen in the wood's like that, you are just plain ignorant.

Salmoneye
April 11, 2013, 06:59 AM
Lower 48 = KGPF-340

http://i48.tinypic.com/o6znth.jpg

gandog56
April 11, 2013, 06:51 PM
I avoid the choice, two total knee replacements sort of ended any hiking for me. But if I did, my choice would be decided by what kind of critters I might run into. Probably one of my two 1911's in 10mm, minimum. If there's Grizzlys about, I want my .454 Casull!

BigBore44
April 12, 2013, 06:03 AM
182657
With 16 rounds of 240 gr XTP's in a custom western holster. Over kill you might say? Probably. Will I ever be under gunned? Nope. Never.

If you enjoyed reading about "What do you carry when you actually hike?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!