Long range hunting: 7mm-08 vs. 30-06?


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Macchina
March 2, 2013, 06:14 PM
Living and hunting in Michigan had taught me one thing: I hunt deer up-close. My gun collection tends to not overlap, so I have a 12ga, .44 Mag 1894, and a Savage 7mm-08 for deer. I am going to hunt Antelope and mule deer in Wyoming later this year and am contemplating a longer range rifle for that hunt. I'm, comfortable out to 300 yards with my 7mm-08, but haven't shot it past that and if I'm going to work up a 400-500 yard max load and practice with it, I'm wondering if I should start with a new rifle?

I've been eyeing the Ruger American rifle and don't own a 30-06 yet so I figured that may be a good place to start working up a 400 yard gun.

Should I look at a different cartridge or rifle? I don't plan on hunting grizzlies our taking 1000 yard shots so huge magnums are probably not necessary.

On the other hand, should I just proceed forward with the 7mm-08?

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06
March 2, 2013, 06:26 PM
Howdy Micheal, am a great fan of '06s but your rifle will do well. Most rifles out perform our abilities as shooters. If you decide to go to an '06 then start using 180-200 gn boolits. They will do better for you than lighter ones. Play with your powder loads to find that "sweet spot". Faster is not always more accurate.

cal30_sniper
March 2, 2013, 06:34 PM
I think the 7mm-08 would be a great starting point for a 400 yard rifle. If I wanted to upgrade to a longer range cartridge, I'd look into a .270 before a .30-06. If you're a hand-loader, the .280 would also be an excellent choice, and would use the same bullets as the 7mm-08 you already have. Then again, I can't think of a situation where either would be that much better suited than the rifle you already have.

Now, if you're just looking to buy another rifle that's good for pretty much everything, it's very hard to go wrong with an '06.

Kachok
March 2, 2013, 06:36 PM
Is your Savage one of the 1:11.5" twists? If so it won't stabilize the longer higher BC bullets for the 7mm. If I were to buy a rifle specifically for long ranged hunting it would not be a 7mm-08 or a 30-06, I have a 270 WSM for that, and it shoots a trajectory you could tightrope across :)

jmr40
March 2, 2013, 06:44 PM
For what you're going to hunt the 7-08 will do fine out to 400+ yards. If elk were on the menu the 30-06 would offer a slight advantage at ranges greater than 400. The 7-08 slightly betters factory 7X57 ballistics. The 7X57 has literally been used to hunt and kill every animal species on the planet.

It is about the bullet. Choose wisely and cartridge headstamp matters little.

Birdhunter1
March 2, 2013, 06:53 PM
Michael after hunting Wyoming Antelope last year I don't think you will have a problem with only a 400 yard gun. While you could get a shot longer than 400 yards the Antelope are so dern thick in population you can be picky and get inside of 400 with relative ease.
My buddy and I took 2 at 175 yards at the same time and I took my 2nd one at 310, only because we busted the herd when we snuck up on them which woudl have been a 50 yard shot.
While not a fan of the 7mm-08 round I wouldn't worry that you will be undergunned with a 7mm-08. I would say any weight bullet for your rifle that shoots relatively flat will be just fine. If it were me on a 7mm-08 (I don't know if you load your own or not) I'd opt for the Nosler 120 gr or 140 gr. Ballistic tip, the 140 gr Sierra Gameking (spitzer or hpbt), or comparable Hornady as they have a decent ballistic coefficient and you should be able to get a decent speed out of them. It doesn't take much to drop an Antelope.

For what it's worth I used my .243 and an 87 Vmax at lightning speed and it shoots very flat, my buddy used my dads 30-06 with Nosler 15 gr ballistic tips. The Vmax's penetrated and played tazmanian devil inside the chest cavity and didn't exit, each antelope ran less than 30 yards. The 150 Nosler's did what all game bullets do, mushroomed, exited, antelope ran 40 or 50 yards.

The_Armed_Therapist
March 2, 2013, 07:04 PM
The only .30-06 loads that will be better than the 7-08 at long range as far as trajectory would be loads that are equal to or less than the power carried by the 7-08. If you're thinking in terms of the .30-06 being more powerful, then the trajectory will be much less favorable than the 7-08. I see no reason that a .30-06 is needed, or even better, than the 7-08 for this task.

Art Eatman
March 2, 2013, 07:39 PM
I don't see any particular need for using other than the 7mm08 for antelope to 400 yards, if you can hit things where you want to at 400 yards. Mule deer? Just off the cuff, I'd figure on maybe 300 yards and maybe 400. Again, it's a skill-level thing.

I got out of the 9.5-pound '06 business and into the 6.5-pound 700 Ti 7mm08 business when my legs cheated on me and went and got old. I was all married up to the 06, so I was confident of hits to 450 or 500 yards--but that was 30 years of experience with that rifle.

Ballistically, the 7mm08 is a .308 with ten grains less bullet weight in the common deer loading. 140 grains for the 7mm08, IOW.

Based on meddling around at various distances to 500 yards, I figure that for trajectory, the difference among such as the 7mm08, .270, .308 and '06 isn't enough to worry about. Basically, I just sight in for two inches high at 100 yards and quit worrying about it. That's pretty close to dead-on at 200. Hold about six inches above where you want to hit, if it's 300 yards. About two feet over at 400.

Pacsd
March 2, 2013, 07:49 PM
Here's what ya do......buy the 06, get it tuned in and take both out west. If something happens to one ya got the other. However, I live in mulie & antelope country. Just because you are coming out west doesn't mean you are going to be shooting at these preceived ranges. I've killed goats from 50 to 300 yards and the same for mulies. They are not some mystical bullet replellant animals. That said, I shoot both 06 and 7mm-08. I take which ever happens to strike my fancy on any given day. I use 150 reloads in the 06 and 139 grain in the '08 either one lets the air out of both with equal capability.

chas08
March 2, 2013, 07:58 PM
I think the 7mm-08 would be a great starting point for a 400 yard rifle I absolutely agree! I own a Remington 700 series Mountain rifle in that caliber. If your not going after anything that a 140 grain bullet isn't adequate for. It sure is a pleasure to carry compared to my 7mm Rem.mag!

sgtstryker
March 2, 2013, 08:48 PM
I had hunted with a Rem 700 in 30.06 or .308 for about all of my hunting years and they worked fine on the deer here in Ga. Then I bought an Encore that just happend to have a 7mm08 barrel. I had never really heard of the round, but, it is a great deer cartridge. The T/C is a great shooting rifle too. This combination really worked for me. Also, a 180 gr.s out of a 30.06 has good energy downrange, so, you can't go wrong either way, IMO.

Abel
March 2, 2013, 08:52 PM
Spend your money on ammo and range time for the 7mm-08.

Kachok
March 2, 2013, 08:59 PM
Yeah either one is suitable but not ideal for 400yards, they do both in fact retain deer killing energy to that range with quality bullets but you will be compensating for alot of drop and drift on windy days, fast shooting high BC bullets really come into their own past the 300 yard mark, anything inside 300 give me a 308, 30-06 or 6.5x55 (my 7mm-08 is still not shooting up to par)

WYOMan
March 2, 2013, 09:39 PM
Stick with what you've got. Practice shooting at different distances out to your self imposed limit, and practice shooting with WIND. You won't need a tough bullet for antelope, they are lightly constructed animals, built for speed.
Long shots are not the norm for hunting here, they are a choice.

Geno
March 2, 2013, 10:22 PM
Here is a dandy little website (Handloads) where you can calculate to your heart's content, and see on paper what others will opine:

Link: http://handloads.com/calc/

If you run that dandy little 7-08 Rem in this program, you'll see that what you have right now, a perfectly fine cartridge. Now, if a man wants to buy another cartridge, I say more power to him...that cause enough, right?

Alternatives to your 7-08 Rem include but are not limited to:

.25-06 Rem (I prefer 100 grains)
.270 Win (I prefer 130 grains)
.280 Rem (I prefer 140 grains)
.30-06 Sprg (I prefer 165 grains)

You will see that all four of these, with the listed projectiles have basically the same trajectory. At 400 yards, the .270 Win hits with +/- 1700 Lbs and the .30-06 with +/- 2,000 pounds. When zeroed at 300 yards, both are -9" at 400 yards. Both will leave an antelope quite dead. The .270 get it done with less recoil. Both, well, all four are excellent choices. That said, what you have will easily get the job job.

Geno

adelbridge
March 2, 2013, 10:41 PM
for anything more than 300 yards I wouldnt consider either 7mm-08 or .30-06. I have a couple 06's and they are great to about 250 yards but wind drift and bullet drop are terrible past 250. Anything 250 or longer longer and I switch to 7mm rem mag, way better BC. I am hooked on 7mm rem mag but I am interested in the WSMs as well.

Kachok
March 2, 2013, 10:43 PM
^ This +1 7mm Rem Mag or 270 WSM are much better at long range, but in the woods give me a 6.5x55 or 308 no need to hit them at 3300fps at 40 yards, does not kill them any more dead and makes a mess.
I started off with the 7mm Rem Mag, switched to the 270 WSM and now I want both :D 270 WSM has better intermediate trajectory 400-600yards (BTW equal to the 257 Wby Mag) but the 7mm Rem Mag can throw some of the highest BC heavy bullet ever made against heavier crosswinds. They both have a really nice string suit.

rcmodel
March 2, 2013, 10:49 PM
So many things wrong here.

Hitting a game animal at 400+ yards is not a problem with almost any centerfire caliber.

Bullet expansion and killing performance at 400+ yards is.

As is finding the best hit animal over 400 yards away, by the time you can hike over yonder, and try to find a blood trail.
When you don't have clue where to start looking for it when you get there.

The scenery looks at whole lot different 400+ yards away when you are looking at it from the other end of the 400+ yards where the animal was standing before it moved off to die.

rc

Kachok
March 2, 2013, 10:53 PM
Well RC I was not trying to go into my 4 page rant on terminal ballistics, I have already had my rant for the day remember :D Yeah you have to not just hit the animal, you have to hit with engough speed to cause your bullet to expand properly. Minimal expansion speeds range from 1,800fps to 2,000fps for most common bullets but 2,200fps is a much better number if you can get it, hence that is why I like heavy high BC bullets they retain that speed much better at range and resist the force of the wind better. Was that OK RC?

dundonrl
March 3, 2013, 01:12 AM
best message on this thread.. don't be shooting animals at extreme ranges.. and yes 400 yards for most people are extreme ranges.. 400 yards is 1200 feet.. (duh) which is almost 1/4 mile.. I've hunted in eastern Oregon, where you can make shots that would put a 400 yard shot to shame, yet I don't take them, because you don't know if your going to wound your animal and let it die a lingering death..

Kachok
March 3, 2013, 01:36 AM
No 400 yards is not that long for a skilled shooter, not the realm of rookies either, but we used to shoot our M16s 300m with iron sights back in the day, I would hold a 7" 10 shot group without a scope, and I was not the best one there, so anyone who says a 400yd shot is automatically unethical has never met a real marksman.

Geno
March 3, 2013, 07:05 AM
dundonrl:

I take issue with your statement. I practice for varmint shooting using 2.25", AR500 steel disks at 300 yards. For that feat, I used my M700 Police, .308 Win, with a Nightforce 12-42X56 scope. I use handloaded 155 grain Lapua projetciles, in form-fired, 1/2 of the neck resized, Lapua brass, Varget powder and a Winchester primer. I can hit 6 for 6. I do occasionally miss, but it's a first-shot zeroing for the 300 yards. By miss, I mean I shave the bullet in-half off the disk's edge. Make no mistake about it, that disk was still "DOA". For me, it gets to a point of boring, hitting those little disks. In my "younger days", when I lived beside a gravel pit, I practiced almost daily, at 300, 400 and 500 yards.

I have shot deer to 525 yards; one-shot-kill. I've shot at least a dozen deer, ram and boar in the ranges of 300 to 325, and prefer to practice my 500 yard shots using 2-liter pop bottles filled with water. I quit wasting that bottle return money when I invested in some AR500 12" and 15" targets. Yes, a shootist should practice before shooting an animal at distance, but you can miss a deer just as easily at 100 yards...if you don't keep up your practice.

Geno

dprice3844444
March 3, 2013, 07:33 AM
find a bullet in the weight that gives you the best ballistic coefficient vs barrel twist and start your loads from there

meanmrmustard
March 3, 2013, 08:00 AM
I like 7.5 Swiss for those ranges.

4season
March 3, 2013, 09:49 AM
When you start shooting past 300 yards things get a little tricky. Any caliber will have significant drop and wind drift at those ranges. As long as you know your range and can figure the windage and drop for your rifle there is little reason to go to a different rifle. The 7-08 will have plenty of energy left at 500 yards to do what you are talking about. I don't think the 30-06 would be enough of a step that you would notice any advantage at 500 yards anyway. What you gain with a faster, flatter shooting bullet is more margin for error on a long shot as well as more energy down range. But energy isn't an issue with these at the range we are talking about so it really comes down to margin for error. Lets say you misjudged your range and though your target was 400 yards when it was really 450 yards away. With a 7 mag this would be a difference of about 8 inches of drop which means you would still hit your target, but might not be the kill shot you were hoping for. With the 7-08 if you made the same mistake you would have 10 inches of drop and almost certainly would not be a kill shot. (By the way, 30-06 on the same example depending on bullet would be between 9 and 20 inch difference)

So to answer the OP question, I would proceed with the 7-08. If you just want a 30-06 go ahead but for what you are talking about it offers no real advantage over your 7-08. If you want a gun better suited for longer ranges that the 7-08, the 270, 7mag, and 300 Win Mag would be better than the 30-06. I personally would take the 270WSM for a long range deer rifle.

Art Eatman
March 3, 2013, 11:20 AM
Hey, it's the Clint Eastwood/Dirty Harry line: "A man's gotta know his limitations." Some folks have no great difficulty in making shots at 400 or more. Others should stay inside of 300 yards. And some folks really oughta stay home.

There ain't no "One size fits all." :D

witchhunter
March 3, 2013, 11:50 AM
Why not take your 7-08 and practice at 400 yards? I would feel better with a gun that I am cofident in it's ballistics. Not all antelopes are killed at 400 yards though. Buy a quality rangefinder and practice so that you know where your bullet will hit at any range. (write your ranges and drops on the stock). BUT, if you want a new gun don't let anyone talk you out of it, I bet everyone on this forum would help you justify it. Just ask us!

Kachok
March 3, 2013, 12:02 PM
OK running the math on a factory 140gr Ballistic Tip (one of the better open country bullets thanks to it's high BC) we do maintain the minimums to 400 yards, not by much but we are there, 2069fps and 1331 ft/lbs you loose your 2000fps minimum at about 430yds depending on exact temp and elevation. With a 100yd zero you have 30.2" of drop at 400yards that is 7.2 MOA adjustment if you have a target scope. Max ideal range with this load is 325 yards beyond which you are loosing considerable expansion.

Zeke/PA
March 3, 2013, 01:31 PM
The Long range shots of course, depend a whole lot on your particular skill level.
Try to find any books by the late,great, Jack O'Conner who has explained the art of game shooting at extended distance in terms that the average guy can understand.
"The Hunting Rifle" is a super start, "The Rifle Book" just as super.
Jack was the Outdoor Life Shooting Editor for a number of years, and wasn't REALLY a fan of "Super Duper, Humpty Dumpty " Magnum calibers.
His indisputable theory was of course "SHOT PLACEMENT" and a real respect for the hunted animal.
Of course, bullet selection means a lot and you have several options these days, especially if you reload.

Kachok
March 3, 2013, 01:46 PM
Using the 150gr BT in the 7mm Rem Mag we see alot more effective range, factory speed is 3100fps at the muzzle giving us a max range of about 625 yards, a maximum ideal range of 500 yards and only 22" of drop at 400 yards. Pretty noticeable difference. Within 325 yards I give the edge to the 7mm-08 but outside that give me the Big 7 any day.

Macchina
March 3, 2013, 02:32 PM
Well,
I can (and have) shot at 300 yards, no problem there. Finding a place to shoot 400 yards gets a bit tricky and even 300 yards is a whole lot of walking when you don't have a spotting scope...

There is a line that occurs between 300 and 400 yards where shooting transitions from point to calculating. I was wondering about shooting just past that line.

I take the advice from people who have hunted at 300+ yards and keep my shots within 300 yards. In my experience when I'm in the woods I get within 100 yards of deer ACCIDENTALLY all the time if the wind is in my face. I have to believe I can get to within 300 yards in open country if I play the wind and stay low.

jmr40
March 3, 2013, 02:42 PM
Using the 150gr BT in the 7mm Rem Mag we see alot more effective range, factory speed is 3100fps at the muzzle giving us a max range of about 625 yards, a maximum ideal range of 500 yards and only 22" of drop at 400 yards.



I have a couple 06's and they are great to about 250 yards but wind drift and bullet drop are terrible past 250. Anything 250 or longer longer and I switch to 7mm rem mag, way better BC.

Then you are using the wrong 30-06 bullets.

Not to get on another topic, but I load 150's, 165's and 180's in my 30-06. I'm getting 3050 fps from a 22" barrel and could match your 3100 fps if I had a 24" barrel. The slightly better BC of the 7mm bullet does give it an edge, but I'm still good on energy for deer past 600 yards and only have 3" more bullet drop at 400 yards.

I'll give a slight edge to the 7 mag, but either round is better than I'm capable of shooting.

Actually shooting 150 in both is working at a handicap. The 30-06 shooting 180's and the 7 mag shooting 160's is a better choice because of much better BC's in both bullet weights. Bullet drop at long range is only 2-3" more, but the energy numbers look much better for both.

With the heavier bullets both are legitimate elk guns to 500 yards. Farther than I will take a shot.

Sav .250
March 3, 2013, 02:48 PM
O6 would do the job. As would the 270. To many cal`s to settle on only one.

303tom
March 3, 2013, 04:28 PM
Howdy Micheal, am a great fan of '06s but your rifle will do well. Most rifles out perform our abilities as shooters. If you decide to go to an '06 then start using 180-200 gn boolits. They will do better for you than lighter ones. Play with your powder loads to find that "sweet spot". Faster is not always more accurate.
My thoughts exactly, could not have said it better................

bobnob
March 4, 2013, 11:10 AM
If I were to be shooting at big game regularly beyond 400y I would be going to something with enough powder capacity to get those bullets out at a healthy MV.

Retained speed and energy via a high BC is one thing, and entirely necessary to ensure quick kills. But if the bullet starts out at mediocre speeds such as the 7-08 and 308 do in the first place, I would be pumping up to a more powerful round.

400 plus regular shots? I would be thinking 7mm Rem Mag or similar. If I was shooting it enough to be comfy with the rifle, I would probably think the 300 WM class of cartridges.

No, I know we are not hunting elephants, and I am not a he-man; there is not a single magnum in my safe. That is because most days 300y pulls me up and the 308/30-06 class cartridges have all the oomph I need for that. My 270 Win allows me to stretch out a little to around 400 yards with 150g bullets with a BC of over 0.5, but only on a good day with very little wind and when I have been practicing a lot.

To the OP, I implore you to keep your shots to ranges at which you have practiced to the point of consistent proficiency. If that's 500y then all well and good, but at those ranges I would be using a heavier hitter than a 7-08 and probably more than a 30-06.

coyote315
March 4, 2013, 09:37 PM
I've killed a few whitetails with long shots I set up intentionally and I would strongly recommend either the 7mm 08 or the .280 remington (also called 7mm Express) if you're into the 7mm bullet. If you're open to suggestions, though, the 6.5- 08 will do anything you ever wanted out to about a thousand yards.
I have a 7mm Express and i don't feel my friend's 7mm Magnum has anything on me: a couple hundred feet per second doesn't matter in the woods IMHO

bobnob
March 5, 2013, 04:17 AM
Coyote315, that's quite a big call mate. The 6.5-08 will do all he wants out to 1000 yards?

The guy is talking about shooting game. Are you for real? Who shoots game at 1000y? One hunter in probably two thousand, that's who. Maybe you might just be setting this bloke up to fail...

I totally agree with your statement that 200fps means stuff-all in the woods. But at 600y it becomes more of a factor because that 308-class bullet is running out of juice to deliver the goods on game. Unless you are dropping that pill into his brain.

Anyway, as you put it, I am open to suggestions. Maybe you can put some data or other info up to convince me that a 6.5-08 (are you talking 260 Rem?) can deliver those goodies at 1000y?

My post might sound inflammatory. It is not deliberately. But unless you are an expert shooter (and lets face it who is?) you are giving the OP unrealistic expectations, in my view.

mdauben
March 5, 2013, 12:12 PM
The .30-06 will carry a little more energy at 500 yards than the 7mm-08, but with the right loads both have similar drop and are still sufficient for deer/antelope sized game at that range. IMO, the most important consideration for a 500 yard hunting rifle is the shooter. You need to be able to determine range, project trajectory and dope the wind to consistently hit at that range.

Eyesac
March 5, 2013, 01:53 PM
On the other hand, should I just proceed forward with the 7mm-08?

I vote for: proceed forward with the 7mm-08

Spend the money you've got on a range finder. Then go practice for the ranges you're thinking you might need and find out what you're capable of. ...And it's probably going to be really windy.

snakeman
March 5, 2013, 06:54 PM
I would just practice with the 7mm-08, unless you just want a 30-06. The 7mm-08 is plenty and antelope are easy to hunt. Just remember practice, practice, practice.

CB900F
March 6, 2013, 04:52 PM
Fella's;

Oh, good grief! Followed by; Bah and Humbug!

The 7mm/08 will do just fine, practice with it.

You do not need heavy bullets to make the ought-6 effective beyond 400 yards.

Antelope are plentiful in Wyoming, lived there for decades & got mine damn near every year. Then I moved to Montana, there's a few here too. If you have to shoot more than three hundred yards to getcher goat in Wyoming you aren't hunting correctly.

The longest shot I've taken an antelope with was in Montana. The gun was a Winchester model 70, .30-06. The bullet was 150 grains and it entered the animal about 2 inches from exactly where I wanted it to. I wanted to hit the spine just in front of the shoulder. Instead it went in just under the spine & just in front of the shoulder. That made no difference, he was rolled over D-E-D when I recovered from recoil. There was a good breeze (Rocky Mountain front range winds) coming over my left shoulder when the shot was made. The laser confirmed range was 470 yards. The scope was a 10X max power with normal crosshairs. However, I did know the gun, the load, the game, and the territory.

900F

kludge
March 6, 2013, 05:22 PM
Is your Savage one of the 1:11.5" twists? If so it won't stabilize the longer higher BC bullets for the 7mm.

this^^^

For what you're going to hunt the 7-08 will do fine out to 400+ yards.

and this ^^^

4season
March 6, 2013, 07:55 PM
If you're open to suggestions, though, the 6.5- 08 will do anything you ever wanted out to about a thousand yards.

I have to take issue with that. First off you know that a 6.5-08 is a .260 Remington right? Now a 260 is a fine cartridge and it is also my favorite deer rifle but a 1000 yard deer gun it is not. Most people would agree that minimum energy for deer is 1000 ft/lbs and 1500 ft/lbs for elk. Loading the hottest handload with the highest BC bullet and assuming a long barrel to get it up to speed, you still drop below 1000 ft/lbs at 800 yards and 1500 ft/lbs at 500 yards. Most of our hunting bullets like to be moving at least 2000 fps to expand properly and you drop below that at 600 yards. Now I know that there are plenty of deer out there that have been killed with less energy than 1000 ft/lbs, many poachers use 22 mags that don't come close to that much energy at the muzzle. But we are talking about taking an ethical long range shot here not a perfectly placed head shot from a few yards away using a spotlight. At 1000 yards there are way to many variables that can factor in to chance less that optimal energy. At that range an accurate 1 MOA gun will only shoot a 10 inch group and that is assuming the wind doesn't change. You could even shoot thru several different wind currents all moving at different speeds and different directions moving your bullet feet off target. Do not claim that a 260 Remington is a 1000 yard deer rifle. Sure some people can shoot it well at that range, but they are shooting paper, not deer.

CB900F
March 6, 2013, 10:24 PM
Fella's;

What he said.

900F

Art Eatman
March 7, 2013, 12:35 AM
Let's don't go wandering off into this 1,000-yard stuff, okay? That's a super-specialized, rarely done by anybody, sort of thing.

We're talking basic deer/elk hunting.

Kachok
March 7, 2013, 04:37 AM
If I could ever get it to shoot right the 154gr SST has a .525BC and can be pushed to just over 2800fps with the right load, that would make it remarkably effective for ranged shooting, dare I say it ON PAR with the 140gr SSTs in 260 and 6.5x55 with 14gr more mass and burning no more powder, I would have to be pushing Berger Hunting VLDs to beat that. But that is a handload, last I checked Hornady did not offer the 154gr in a 7mm-08 factory load, they do make a Superformance 140gr at 3000fps but it shoots like crap in my rifle, then again all factory fodder does.

4895
March 20, 2013, 11:36 PM
I would use the 7mm-08 for hunting ranges.

I prefer .284 bullets over .308 bullets for long range shooting. If you want to get a new rifle, I don't think you could go wrong with a .280 Remington or even a 7mm Rem Mag (if you like the recoil).

meanmrmustard
March 21, 2013, 07:14 AM
6.5-08?

.260 Remington, methinks.

dodge
March 21, 2013, 07:55 AM
Why worry about shooting more than 300 yards even at 300 yards if the animal is that far away you should be able to stalk closer than that. Then it doesn't matter which rifle you have. To me hunting isn't how far you shoot an animal it's how being able to hit what I'm shooting at for the one shot kill and for me that means 300 yards or closer preferable closer.

unreal45
March 21, 2013, 04:52 PM
You might say I'm not a marksman if I can't make a clean kill every time from 400 yds. OK I can accept that, however IMO you aren't a hunter if you can't get within 300 yds.

Kachok
March 21, 2013, 07:24 PM
You might say I'm not a marksman if I can't make a clean kill every time from 400 yds. OK I can accept that, however IMO you aren't a hunter if you can't get within 300 yds.
+1 I have walked upright across a wide open field and walked within 150 yards of a pair of deer with them watching me the whole time, not saying an old buck or a mulie would let me do that but I think long range hunting is largely unnecessary. 400 yards is not unrealistic though if you are talking open terrain and skittish deer.

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