Suicide, Safety First...


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RED-DOG 40
March 12, 2004, 08:39 AM
25-year-old St. George man commits suicide

ST. GEORGE -- A St. George man committed suicide Tuesday night at about 10:45 near the St. George City offices.

A Utah Highway Patrol trooper apparently attempted to pull over the 25-year-old male on St. George Boulevard, but the male fled in his car.

The officer finally pulled him over near 100 East and 200 North when the male exited his car.

He apparently made a comment about committing suicide, put on ear protection and shot himself in the chest.

Police blocked off 200 East at 200 North and 100 East at 200 North during the time of the incident to safeguard the scene. :banghead:

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Henry Bowman
March 12, 2004, 09:00 AM
What about eye protection? :rolleyes:


Actually, he needed to duct tape a trauma plate to his chest. :uhoh:

Seroiusly, sorry for his family. And too bad he had to add to Sarah Brady's firearm death stats. At 25 years of age, he will be counted as a "child." :scrutiny:

Tamara
March 12, 2004, 09:41 AM
put on ear protection and shot himself in the chest.

Now that is funny! :p

Ed Straker
March 12, 2004, 10:14 AM
Couple of years ago I read about a guy who locked himself in his car in his garage and shot himself in the chest with a shotgun. He wasn't found for a day or two, but pinned to his shirt was a note saying he wanted to donate his organs.

tyme
March 12, 2004, 11:11 AM
Ed, evidently he was referring to his brain. :uhoh:

QuarterBoreGunner
March 12, 2004, 12:47 PM
The final thoughts of a person intent on suicide are obviously God’s Own Mystery.

Case in point: when working the ammo counter at my old indoor range/store, I had a guy come in, rent eye and ear protection, get some target and also rent the Colt Anaconda .44. He then came over to where I was working the ammo counter and asked for “the most powerful hunting ammo” we had. I set him up with a box of Hornady 300grn XTP which we used to keep on hand for the pig hunters in the area. He complained about the price and decided to get a box of Fed red box 240grn instead. Then he promptly went into the men’s room and shot himself in the head.

Now the really strange part is that when you sign in to shoot, we used to keep a tab running, so that if you needed more ammo or targets for the range, we’d just add them to the tab and you’d pay at the end.

So what the heck was the guy complaining about the price for? IT’S NOT LIKE HE WAS GOING TO PAY FOR IT!

Just plain weird.

MMcCall
March 12, 2004, 01:29 PM
So what the heck was the guy complaining about the price for? IT’S NOT LIKE HE WAS GOING TO PAY FOR IT!

Old habits die hard. Harder than the individual, apparently.

QuarterBoreGunner
March 12, 2004, 01:40 PM
Old habits die hard I suppose so. I guess it was the same for the guy with the earmuffs. Perhaps it's a variation of the old theme of reverting to your training. In moments of stress your body responds like it was trained/practiced to do. Going to shoot a gun? Put on hearing protection.

jsalcedo
March 12, 2004, 03:14 PM
If I was ever to off myself I would be sure to wear some second chance body armor.

P95Carry
March 12, 2004, 03:33 PM
Suicide, whether by gun or any other means .. is incredibly selfish. I wonder in many cases, if they have even an atom of a clue as to what a mess and sadness they leave behind .... and I ain't referring to the blood either.

Easy way out perhaps but oh brother .. I have seen the aftermath twice in my life .. it is horrific what this does to families.

Stickjockey
March 12, 2004, 03:42 PM
It may be just an ingrained desire for safety, even in the face of death. A couple years ago I bought one of the Yugo M-48 Mausers with the "full kit" - sling, bayonet with scabbard and frog, cleaning kit, yadda yadda - got it home and started to clean it up. When I pulled the bayonet from the scabbard, it was covered in cosmolene or some such stuff that had probably been there since the gun was packed away. The first though that went through my head was, "Holy ****, this things nasty! What kind of infections would that cause if you actually used it?" Yes, I was concerned that anyone I might have to try to kill with this thing would get infected!:scrutiny:

QuarterBoreGunner
March 12, 2004, 03:53 PM
For some reason, the more I think about it, this story reminds me the medical technician that swabs the condemned convicts arm with the alcohol before the lethal injection…

M2 Carbine
March 12, 2004, 07:11 PM
My father used a gun.

I don't think I'de use a gun.
Someone has to clean up that mess, that's nasty.

Then using a gun is like disrespecting something you have held in a place of honor for years.

The_Antibubba
March 13, 2004, 05:00 AM
Post deleted by moderator.

gunsmith
March 13, 2004, 05:41 AM
from now on,dont let them take their guns into the crapper,especially the rentals!

You know sooner or later some one is gonna come out of there after accidently dropping YOUR gun into a clogged up toilet,or will try to clear a clog with a .45 drain cleaner!

QuarterBoreGunner
March 15, 2004, 12:32 PM
gunsmith- yeah we put a stop to people taking firearms into the bathroom after that. It just never occured to us that someone would cap themselves in a john.

accidently dropping YOUR gun into a clogged up toiletSomeday I'll have to relate the time I performed an unauthorized combination 'drop-test/hostile-enviroment' test on my Glock 30 in the mens room at the range. :uhoh:



M2 Carbine- You are correct, it's extremely nasty to clean up after a suicide. We had three in the entire 10 year history of the former National Shooting Club, and the best thing I can say was at least the guy in the mens room did it on a tile floor. The other two were out on the range and we had to rip up and replace the carpet. Very messy.

Sorry to hear about your father.

Nighthawk
March 15, 2004, 01:25 PM
Why did Kamikazi pilots wear helmets? :banghead:

Joe Demko
March 15, 2004, 02:12 PM
A friend of mine committed suicide with a Winchester .30-30. Coroner's men took the torso and the biggest chunks of the head away. I cleaned up the rest. Suicides are definitely some rude and selfish people.

Chuck Jennings
March 15, 2004, 02:32 PM
Perhaps he was concerned about flinching.

braindead0
March 15, 2004, 02:44 PM
Suicides are definitely some rude and selfish people. I just love when selfish people say that.. doesn't anybody realize how selfish it is to claim that someone who commits suicide is being selfish?

Utter B.S., everybody is selfish... who's more so; the person who kills him/herself or the survivers who whine on about how selfish that person was?

I've had close friends (no relatives that I'm aware of) take plan 'B', and never once did I think them selfish for doing so....

On the other hand, I agree it sure is rude to use a firearm to do so.. Fall on a sword (I had one friend that did that), at least it has style.

P95Carry
March 15, 2004, 03:11 PM
Braindead ........who's more so; the person who kills him/herself or the survivers who whine on about how selfish that person was? Re Golgo's comment, and mine earlier on that ....

There are shall we say .... 2 ways to do it.

Method #1 .. planned in advance meticulously ... finances, legal matters - all wrapped up .. maybe too a note .. and it all might be due to a terminal illness and the person's wish to quit. I have little problem with that ... after all our lives are ours. It would be selfish in that sorta case to wish the person to continue to suffer.

Method #2 .... this is the one I think we are thinking of. Possibly/probably someone much younger .. probably fit and well .... with family, kids, commitments ..... but maybe they have tired of stress, they could be depressed also - I'll admit that. However, these cases just ''do it''! No prep'ing ... no notes ... nothing ''tidied up'' ..... so what do they leave behind, having abrigated their responsibilities to family etc??

CHAOS! There is the trauma of that event ... it is after all probably a loss of a loved one. Others have to sort out all this mess .... and get things in order. Plus often, immense financial embarrassment.

THAT is a selfish suicide ... no thought for others thru the deed .... simply the ''easy option'' .... a ''get-out'' if you will. ''Screw the world and everyone in it - I'm outa here''!!!

You may still adhere to your comment . and we'll agree to disagree but ... acknowledge at least ... there are two very distinct basic types of suicide ...... and they affect the outcome and sequele - dramatically.

QuarterBoreGunner
March 15, 2004, 03:56 PM
Well said Chris.

Mulliga
March 15, 2004, 05:03 PM
On the other hand, I agree it sure is rude to use a firearm to do so.

Quite frankly, I'd much prefer using a gun to commit suicide. Quick, painless, and reliable. We all talk about how guns are best for self-defense, but if it can stop a BG, it can sure as heck stop you from breathing. If I had a terminally ill relative who was bedridden and wanted to end it all after saying goodbye to everyone, I certainly wouldn't like them to use an inefficient method that might get botched up.

Weimadog
March 15, 2004, 10:11 PM
clbj Perhaps he was concerned about flinching.

If that were truly a concern, he could have loaded some "snap caps" :scrutiny:

Matt G
March 16, 2004, 12:01 PM
A note, here:

The originally referenced story is pretty interesting, in its irony. Inevitably, though, thinking people will get to considering the nature of human behavior, and its odder manifestations when a person believes suicide is their only option left. Personal examples are then brought out by those who are haunted by them. This can create a discrepancy, in which some of us are still appreciating the ironic humor of the original post, while others are struggling with the weight of their own painful memories of the death of a loved one, or of a stranger who hurt them by striking at himself.

On this board, we speak daily of the use and care of deadly weapons, and so we can begin to find ourselves, perhaps, a tad jaded to the concept of the aftermath when they are employed, for good or bad. But this is TheHighRoad, and I would ask you, kind Members, to have consideration and respect for your fellow Member who may well be reliving a nightmare.

--Matt G

Kentucky Rifle
March 16, 2004, 12:30 PM
Some of you guys, especially the ones who made jokes about suicide, don't know anything about or have not experienced the hopeless, helpless feeling with which PTSD leaves you. Let me tell you.
You feel ALONE. You feel as if there's NOTHING good left for you in this whole world, and there never will be.
One guy, who I dream about frequently, got a strange look on his face. He looked at us all--then, without one word and his weapon in his hands, just walked out the helicopter door and disappeared into the slip-stream.
Not being regular military, I went back and tried to find his body. I never did. I really don't know what I was looking for. A note maybe. Some explanation I could send his family maybe.
The same thing happens here, in the world. A person reaches the point where he doesn't see anything to live for. He knows in his heart that his being here or NOT being here doesn't mean a thing.
He knows, in his heart, that in six months--no one will remember the color of his eyes, or the sound of his voice.
I agree that using a firearm to "do it" would be best done out in the woods where no one will ever find the "remains".
The problem is that by the time you reach that point, you're not thinking about someone cleaning up the "aftermath". You just want OUT. Also, oddly, nobody see the "signs" until "after". The last one that happened close to me went like this. He was sitting at the dinner table with extended family and friends. He seemed extremely happy, even calm. He ate his meal and was the first to finish. He excused himself and went to the basement rec-room. The people still sitting at the table heard a "BANG". One or two ladies thought that he had dropped a book--flat on it's cover. However one uncle knew better. He asked everyone to stay at the table, and walked slowly downstairs. He knew what he was going to find. This man, who outwardly had no problems at all, had cocked a Marlin 30-30, put it in his mouth, and pulled the trigger. The uncle walked slowly back up the stairs and said one thing. "He's gone".
The man didn't intend to be stupid. He didn't intend for the problems he had created for the people who had to "clean up". Most of you can imagine what would happen in you put a 30-30 in your mouth and pulled the trigger.
I think I've gone about as far as I want to here. Sorry to those who think I'm just rambling--maybe I am. But some pain, you simply don't see. (Or even understand.) I hope someone understands the meaning of my reply.

KR

P95Carry
March 16, 2004, 12:51 PM
Thx KR . you make some very salient points ... which I understand. In fact the whole deal is very complex ..... and being judgemental is always easy.

Unfortunately, the effects on me thru the two experiences with which I came into contact ... still left me feeling the devastation of those ''left behind''. That is hard to erase from memory.

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